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Full text of "The New England historical and genealogical register"

REYNOLDS HISTOgSCAL 
GEN.EALOGY COLLECTION 



\ 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01723 8590 



GENEALOGY 

974 

N42NA 

1895, 

PT.l 



e 



THE 



NEW-ENGLAND 



HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



REGISTER 



1895 



Volume XLIX par t 1 



January thru April 




BOSTON 

PUBLISHED BY THE SOCIETY 

1895 















Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 



http://archive.org/details/newenglandhistorv49p1wate 



X 715287 



ISoitor. 
JOHN WARD DEAN, A.M., 

18 Somerset Street, Boston. 



puBTfefjmrj Committee. 

ALBERT HARRISON IIOYT, A.M., V/ILLARD SPENCER ALLEN, A.M. 
FRANK ELIOT BRAD1SII, A.B., GEORGE BROWN KNAPP, A.M., 

JOHN AVART) DEAN, A.M. 



INDEX OF SUBJECTS. 



Adams, Query, 457 

Adams Gary, Standish, Query, 342 

Additions and Corrections, 451 

AgeS Persons in Deertield, Note, 339 

Allen, Query, 343 

Ames, Frederick Lothrop, 273 

Ancestry of Gov. William Stone of Maryland, 314 

Archives of Harvard University, 35 

Alkins, Query, 457 

Attwood, Query, 212 

Autographs, see Illustrations. 

Autographs in a Family Bible, Query, 311 

Avery, Note, 453 

Baker, Query, 74 

Baptisms in the Second Church in Pembroke, 

Mass., 1748-1803, 28<i, 420 
Barnes— Barns, Query, 77, 345 
Barns Family Reunion, 458 
Barnum, Query, 343 
Baxter, Query, 344 
Belknap, <">S 

Query, 213 
Boll, lion. Charles Henry, 9 
Bingham Genealogy, 333 

Biographical Sketches (see also Necrology) — 
Eurwaker, John Parsons, 479 
lloadlev, Harriet Louisa, 230 
Howe. 'Ellas, 480 
Pond, Nathan Gillette, 104 
Preseott, Benjamin Franklin, 230 
Shapleigli, James Bartlett, 104 
Births in Medvvav, Mass., 1714-1741, 280, 414 
Blackmer, Query", 214 
Boltwood, Robert, Query, 214 
fliook Notices — 

Adams's Descendants of James and Wil- 
liam Adams, •.':!!, 304 
American Historical Register, 98 
Ancestry and Descendants of Gershom 

'Morehouse, 474 
Andrews's History of the Hamlin Family, 

231 
Arnold's Narragansett Records, 229 
Arnold's Vital Records of Rhode Island, 

1030-1850, 473 
Bailey's Photo-Ancestral Record, 90 
Bailey— Bayley Second Family Gathering, 

232 
Balch Leaflets, 474 
Barber's British Family Names, 94 
Bellas's History of Delaware Society of 

the Cincinnati, 472 
BiographicalSkelclicsofCitizens of Broome 

Co., N. Y.,97 
Biographical Sketches of Citizens of Co- 
lumbia Co., N. V., 07 
Bradlee's Recollections? of a Ministry of 

Forty Years, &>2 
Bradley's Bradley Family of Fairfield, with 
Notes of Collateral Ancestors on the 
Female Side, 99 
Brown's Bedford Old Families, 99 
Brown's Flag of the Minute Men, April 19, 

1775, 470 
Brown's < >M New England Life. Legends 

of Old Bedford, 227 
Brown's Nhepurd Family, 100 
Browning's Americans of Royal Descent, 
227 



Book Notices— 

Bulloch's Genealogy of the Families of Bel- 
linger and De Veaux, 304 

Bulloch's History and Genealogy of the 
Stewart, Elliott and Dunwody Families, 
304 

Burt's Early Days in New England or Life 
and Times of Henry Burt of Springfield,99 

Chamberlin's Chamberlin Descent, 474 

Chief Justice Little, 474 

Clark's Oliver Cromwell, 471 

Concord, Mass. Births, Marriages and 
Deaths, 1035-1850, 228 

Concord, N. II., Town Records, 471 

Continuous Family Genealogy, withCharts, 
etc., 303 

Crafts's Crafts Family, 99 

Cushing's Indexed Genealogical Register, 
409 

Cushing's Sketch of Chauncy-IIall School, 
472 

Davidson's Genealogical Charts, 231 

Deacon's Family of Meres and Some Early 
English Newspapers, 474 

Deacon's Sketch of the Deacon Family, 474 

Densmore's llartwell Family, 303 

Descendants of William Bailey of New- 
port, R. I., 474 

Descendants of James Young, 99 

Dorr's Record of Lineage of Dorr and Other 
Families, 408 

Dover, N. II., Historical Society's Collec- 
tions, 471 

Dow's History of Hampton, N. II., 2.20 

Drake's Making oft he Ohio Valley States,95> 

Earle's Diary of Anna Green Winslow, a 
Boston .school Girl of 1771, 90 

Early Records of I'rovidence, R.I., Fourth 
Report, 302, 409 

Egleston's Life of Major General John 
Paterson, 301 

Estes's History of Ilolden, 90 

Family Records of James and Sarah Gibbs 
of Bristol, Mass., 99 

Fitzpen als. Phippen, 301 

Ford's British Officers Serving in America, 
1754-1774, 408 

Garlick's History of the Trubee Family, 99 

Genealogical Account of the Macraes, 303 

Gibbon Commemoration Proceedings, 1794- 
1894, 473 

Gould's Family of Zaccheus Gould of Tops- 
held, Mass., 303 

Haines's Fssex Family of Haynes, 474 

Harvard Commencement Days, 407 

Dawes's Edward II awes and Some of His 
Descendant, 303 

Hawkes's Essex Farms, 470 

liawkes's Rambles along Saugus River, 470 

Hawkes's Why the Old Town House was 
Built, 470 

Hayden's Dade of Virginia, 99 

Haydcn's Fowke, 99 

Hayden's llooe— Barnes of Virginia and 
Maryland, 99 

Hayden's Major John Garrett, a Forgotten 
lieroof Wyoming, 171 

Hey wood's Judge John Speed and Family, 
471 

Hill's Dedham Town Records, 471 



dV 



Index of Subjects. 



u5ook Notices — 

J I ill's Early Records of Dedham, Muss., 

1059-4073, 97 
nfctory of Florence, Mass., 300 
History of Jllinois Society of Colonial 

Wars, 473 
Hitchcock's Hitchcock Genealogy, 90 
llondloy's 1'ublic Records of Connecticut, 
with Journal of Council of Safety, 1770- 
1778, 228 
Hooker, 474 

Howells's Life in Ohio from 1813-1810, 230 
Inscriptions from the Old Cemetery In 

Grovelaud, Mass., 3(52 
Items of Ancestry, 303 
Kelton's Family Items, 231 
Kelton's Sprague Family Items, 100 
King's Odell Pedigree, 99 
Lee's Lee of Virginia, 406 
Letter from Rebecca, Boylston to Edward 

Boylston, 408 
Literary Works of Benjamin Tompson,407 
Love's Fast and Thanksgiving Days of 

New England, 229 
Lower Noi folk County, Va., Antiquary, 108 
Ludlam's Sketch of the Ludlam Family, 231 
Mckinstry's Bailey- Bay ley Association,232 
Macrae's Genealogy of theAchnagart Fam- 
ily, founded by Fonaclian Dim, 303 
Magazine of Daughters of the Revolution, 
Maine Historical Magazine, 98 [98 

Maine Historical Society's Collections and 

Proceedings, 231 
Maitby-Morehouse Family Record, 303 
Mann's Record of the English Manns, 231 
Marsh Genealogy, 303 
Martin's Grasshopper in Lombard Street, 93 
Massacre of Wyoming, Acts of Congress 
for the Defence of the Wyoming Valley, 
Penn., 1770-1778, 229 
JUehetabel Chandler Coit, Her Book, 1714, 

232 
Michael Wigglesworth and his Day of 

Doom, 407 
Military and Naval Annals of Danvers, 

Mass., 470 
Montague's Peter Montague and his De- 
scendants, 231 
Morris's Ancestors and Descendants of 
Stephen Lincoln of Oakham, Mass., 231 
Moynahan's Historic Danvers, 470 
Muskett's Sutl'olk Manorial Families, 229 
Notes upon the Ancestry of Ebenezer 

Greenongh, 303 
•Opening of the New Haven Colony His- 
torical Society's Building, 95 
Parker's Gleanings from Parker Rccords,99 
Farsons's Larsons Genealogy, 100 
Patterson'* Lincoln County Probate Rec- 
ords, 98 
Pennsylvania Register of Society of Sons 

of the Revolution, 472 
Perkiomen Region, Past and Present, 408 
Pickford's Needhaiu Branch of the Tolman 

Family, 100 
Plcrson's Descendants of Stephen Picrson, 

303 
Porter's Capt. John Thomas of Braintree, 

31 ass., 301 
Prime's Bowdoin Family, with Notices of 

Porlngi , Lynde, Newgate, Living, 99 
Prime's Descent of John Nelson, with 
Notes on Taller and Stoughton Families, 
lot) 
.Prime's Temple Family, 99 
Proceedings of Fitchburg Historical So- 
ciety, 171 
Proceedings of the Massachusetts Society 

of Colonial Wars, 173 
.Provost's Notes o( the Provost Family, 474 
Fublicat Ions of the Rhode Island Historical 

Society, 97, 231 
Published Records of Midway Church, 
Georgia, 302 



Book Notices- 
Putnam Leaflets, 474 

Putnam's History of the Putnam Family, 
471 

Raum's Tour Around the World, 303 

Record of the Descendants of Allen Breed, 
303 

Reed's Bath and Environs, Sagadahock 
Co., Me., 95 

Register of the District of Columbia So- 
ciety of the Sons of the Revolution, 472 

Register of the General Society of Colonial 
Wars, 473 

Register of the Massachusetts Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution, 472 

Register of the Iowa Society of the Sons 
of the Revolution, 472 

Register of Pedigrees of the New York 
Genealogical Society, 409 

Register ot the Pennsylvania Society of 
Sons of the Revolution, 472 

Report on Canadian Archives, 300 

Report of Lawrence Academy, Groton, 
Mass., 301 

Report of Massachusetts Commissioners on 
New Hampshire and Vermont Bounda- 
ries, 301 

Representative Men of Connecticut, 1861- 
1894, 230 

Rice's Dictionary of Worcester, Mass., and 
Vicinity, 471 

Ripley's Ancestors of Lieutenant Thomas 
Tracy of Norwich, Conn., 303 

Roe's Historic Records of an Old Family, 
100 

Roe's Rose Neighborhood Sketches, 98 

Savage's Family of John Savage, 100 

Sliepard's Ralph Shepard Puritan, 99 

Southern Historical Society Papers, 230 

Standish's Standishes of America, 231 

Suffolk Deeds, Liber VIE, 220 

Sumner Genealogy Additions and Correc- 
tions, 232 

Supplement No. 2 to the Genealogy of the 
Family of Gamaliel Gerould, 232 

Tributes to the Memory of Robert C. Wm- 
throp by Massachusetts Historical So- 
cietv, 405 

Tuttle's Ancestral Chart, 409 

Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the New York 
Genealogical Society, 407 

Van Hoosear's Inscriptions from Oldest 
Cemetery in Norwalk, Connecticut, 408 

Varney's Story of Patriots' Day, Lexing- 
ton and Concord, April 19, 1775, 470 . 

Virginia Magazine of -History and Biogra- 
phy, 231 

Walker's Old Hartford Burying Ground, 
472 

Watertown Records, 97 

Webster's One Branch of the Webster 
Family, 474 
■ Weston Town Records, 471 

West's Pierce Family Record, 99 

Wheelwright's A Frontier Family, 474 

William and Mary College Quarterly, 231 

Williams's Needed Corrections in the Pedi- 
gree of the Cotton Family, 304 

Winthrop's Reminiscences of Foreign 
Travel, 405 

Withers'* Chronicles of Border Warfare, 

Year Book of Illinois Society of Sons of 

the Revolution, 172 
Year Book of Iowa Society of Sons of the 

Revolution, 472 
Zieber's Heraldry in America, 230 
British Ollicers Serving in America, 1754-1774, 

47, 100, 292 
Browning, Query, 157 
Bryent, Walter, Query, 213 



Captain Thomas Hobby's Com 
Connecticut Iteglmont, Note, 7 
Cury, Note, 342 



Company, Second 






Index of Subjects. 









Chandler, Hon. John, Sketch of, 141 

Chalmers, Query, 213 

Chanr.Ing, Perkins, Wainwright, Query, 344 

Chase, Query, 74; Reply, 458 

Chief Justice of the United States, 275 

Guilds Family, Query, 209 

Church, Query, 76 

Chipp, dipt. Roger, 215 

Cluy, Query, 77 

Cotcord-Colliu, Query, 213 

Collins Family Reunion, 458 

Contributions to a 'Trumbull Genealogy, 148, 

322-, 417 
Contributors and contributions to Volume 
XL IX.— 
Alden, Mrs. Charles L. 

Snow Genealogy, 71, 202, 451 
Avery, Mrs. Klroy M. 

Baptisms in the Second Church at Pem- 
broke, Mass., 1748-180.J, 28(5, 426 
Baker, Daniel \V. 

The (irasshojiper in Boston, 24 
Hunks, Charles Edward. 

Diary of Rev. William Homes of Chil- 
mark, Martha's Vineyard, 1080-174(5, 
413 
Bingham, Capt. Theodore A. 
Bingham Genealogy, 333 
Brown, William Garrott. 

Archives of Harvard University, 35 
Byington, Ezra lloyt. 

Necrology of New- England Historic Gen- 
ealogical Society, 81, 210, 340, 401 
Codman, Arthur Amory. 

Belknap, 08 
Cornwall, Edward E., M.D. 

Family of William Cornwall, 30 
Dean, John Ward. 

Sketch of Hon. John Chandler, 141 
Doggett, Samuel B. 

Letter of Rev. James Noyes, 1604, 285 
Felton, E. C. 

English Ancestors of John Bent of Sud- 
bury, 05 
Ford, Worthington Chauncey. 

British Olllcers Serving in America, 1751- 

1771, 47, 100, 202 
Letters of Elbridge Gerry, 430 
Gordon, George A. 

Colonel Job Gushing, 113 
Old York County (Me.) Records, 40 
United States Pensioners, Essex Co., 
.Mass., 310 
Haines, A. M. 

Material Kelating to the Essex Family of 
II ay nes, :t01 
Hill, EOwurd B. • 

Muster Roll of Capt. King's Company, 
Aug. 1, 1775, 200 
Hill, Edwin A. 

Saybiook Branch of the Family of Dep. 
Gov. William Jones, 310 
Hills, WiliiamS. 

Rose (l)unster) Hills, 140 
Humphrey, Otis M. 

Descendants of Robert Dennis of Ports- 
mouth, R. I., 441 
Jameson, Rev. E. O. [444 

Births in Medway, Mass., 1714-1744, 280, 
King, Marquis F. 

Shawe, 69 
Kingman, Bradford. 

Cen. Edward Augustus Wild, 405 
Lea, J. Henry. 

Con! ribut ions to a Trumbull Genealogy, 
148, 322, 417 
l'hillimore, W. 1'. W. 

More Notes on the English Gartields, 104, 
300, 410 
Porter, Joseph W. U™ 

(apt John Thomas of Braintree, Mass.* 
J'rcscolt, Benjamin F. 

Portraits in New Hampshire of Public 
.Men and Others, 177 



Contributors and contributions — 
Raven, Rev. John .J. 

Families in Fressin^field, England, Wish- 
ing to Emigrate to America, 337 
Richardson, Hon. William A. 

Chief Justice of tin- United States, 275 
Harvard University Presidents, and the 
Election of Messrs. Quincy and El iot,5'J 
Rylands, J. Paul. 

Deeds of the Mather Family of AVest 
Leigh, Lancashire, 1009-1632, 20 
Shifter, Rev. Edmund F. 

Memoir of Hon. Charles II. Bell, LL.D.,9 
Stebbins, Oliver B. 

Inscriptions at Longmeadow, Mass., 335 
Stone, Elliot. 

Ancestrv of Gov. William Stone of Mary- 
land, 314 
Swan, Robert Thaxter. 

Some Dorchester Matters, 153 
Titus, Anson. 

The Town History, 191 
Trask, William Blake. 

Letters of Col. Thomas Westhrook and 
Others, 183 
Waters, Henry F. 

Genealogical Gleanings in England, 105, 
237, 300, 481 
White, Hon. George. 

Probate Courts of Massachusetts, 60 
Willeox, E. S. 

Capt. William Meaoham at Hunker Hill, 

203 
Willson, Rev. Edmund B. 

Sketch of Frederick Lothrop Ames, 273 
Cotton Family, Needed Correction in Pedigree, 

180 
Cratfleld Parish Documents, 215 
Gushing, Col. Job, 143 
Gushing, Ezekiel Dodge, Reply, 77 

Daniel, Query, 341 

Date of (ieorge Haggle's Birth, Reply, 345 

Deeds of York County, Maine, Note, 200 

Dependence Walker, Query, 345 

Derby, Hobart, Sumner, Query, 340 

Descendants of Benjamin Clarke and Miriam 

Kilby, Note, 208 
Descendants of Robert Dennis of Portsmouth, 

R. I., 441 
Descendants of Robert Derrick, Query, 344 
Diary of Anna Green Winslow, Note, 340 
Diary of Rev. William Homes of Chilmark, 

Martha's Vineyard, 10.80-1740, 413 
Dickinson, Query, 77 
Draper, Query, 341 " 

Early Boston Bookbinder, Note, 210 

Early Insurance of Animals against Lightning, 

Note, 330 
Elwell, Query, 213 
English Ancestors of John Bent, 65 
Errata, 230, 451, 510 
Everett, Note, 453 
Exact Dates Wanted, Query, 345 

Families in FressingReld, England, Wishing 

to Emigrate to America, 337 
Family of William Cornwall, 30 
Family Reunions, 458 
Fountain, Query, 74 
Fulford, John, Query, 342; Reply, 458 

Gannett, Note, 340 ' 

Genealogical Gleanings in England, 105, 237, 

300, 4>1 
Genealogies— 

Belknap, 68 

Bent, 05 

Bingham, 333 

Gary, 401 

Com wall, 39 

Cotton, 180 

Dennis, 441 



VI 



Index of Subjects 



Genealogies— 

Garfield, 194, 300, 419 
Haynes, 301 

j onos, 310 

Mather, 29 

Phippen, 245 

Shawe, (>4 

Snow, 71, 202, 101 

Stom 1 , :; 1 1 

Thomas, 172 

Trumbull, 148, 322,417 
Genealogies in L'rcparation*T- 

Asldcy, 340 

Bangs, 78 

Remis, 459 

Bond, 340 

Carpenter, 459 

Chase, 215 

Clcveland-CIeuveland, 78 

Drake, 459 

Edwards, 340 

Egglestoii, 215 

Everett, 215 

Hartwrll, 210 

Hazard, 340 

Herrick, 346 

Hills, 210 

Hodges, 459 

Jones, 210 

Kelsey, 459 

Kimball, 210 

Livingston, 78 

Mason, 78 

Minot, 310 

Morgan, 459 

Munsoh, 78 

Preston, 310 

Prince, 459 

Sayres, 210 

Street, 78 
Gillman Family, Note, 215 
Grant, Roger, Note, 210 
Grasshopper in Boston, 24 
Green, Query, 77 
Grecnlcnf Family, 210 
Guild, Query, 210 

Harvard University, College Presidents and 
the Election of Messrs. Quincy and Eliot, 59 
liawes, Query, 211 
Haynes, Material Kelatingto the Essex Family 

of, 304 
Healev, Query, 214 
1 1 ills, "Hose (Duuster), 140 
llisroiioal Intelligence, 73, 208, 338, 4:>S 
Historical Societies, Proceedings oi— 

Maine, 80, 218, 318, 400 

Methuen, 3 is 

NeW'England Historic Genealogical, 78, 
210, 347 

Old Colony, 79, 217, 400 

Rhode Island, 60, 210, 348, 400 

Utah, 348 

Illustrations- 
Arms of Purges impaling l'hippen, 242 
Arms of Fitzpen alias Phippen, 245 
Arms of Phippeii impaling Pye, 215 

Autograph: 
George l'hippen., 245 

Grave of (Jen. Kdward A. Wild, 115 

Inscriptions: 
Gravestone of Gov. John Haynes of Hart- 

ford, Conn., 309 
Gravestones at Longmeadow, 335 
Monument in Ooggeshall Church, Essex, 

Eng., 308 
Tablets in Co'pford Church, Essex, Eng.,309 

Portraits: 
Ames, Frederick L., 273 
Pell, Charles Henry, 9 
Chandler, John, 141 
Wild, Fdwurd A., 1C5 



Tubular Pedigrees : 

Cary, 401 

Fitzpen als. l'hippen, 245 

Gartleld, 449 

Haynes, 308 

Stone, 314 
Inscriptions in the Burial-Ground at Long, 
meadow, Mass., 335 

Jerauld, James, Query, 76 

Jones, Note, 453 

Jones, Query, 343 

Jones.William.Saybrook Branch of the Family 

of, 310 
Joy, Note, 73 

Kent, Query, 70 

King, Muster Boll of Company of Capt. John, 

1775, 200 
K.iOwles, Parentage of Mary and Suzanna, 

Query, 75 

Li.mb, Query, 450 

Larmon and Town send, Query, 456 

Lattimer, Query, 212 

Le Courtois, J. B., Note, 340 

Lee, Ralph, Query, 212 

Letter of Rev. James Noyes, 1094, 285 

Letters— 

dishing, Job, 143 

Gerry, Elbridge, 430-441 

Noyes, James, 285 

Russell of Killowen, 279 

Thomas, John, 172 

Westbrook, Thomas, 183 

Whitmore, William H., 205 
Letters of Elhridge Gerry, 430 
Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrook and Others, 

183 
Lilly, Samuel, Query, 457 
Locke, Query, 311 

Malt by, Query, 74 

Mather Family of Lancashire, Some Deeds of, 
29 

Maverick, John, 214, 458 

Mayiiower Descendants, Society of, 340 

Meacbam, Captain William at Hunker Hill, 203 

Memoirs- 
Ames, Frederick Lothrop, 9 
Bell, Charles Henrv, 141 
Chandler, John, 273 
Wild, Edward Augustus, .105 

Moore, Query. 457 

More Notes on the English Garflelds.194,300,449 

Morse, Note, 153 

Murray, Query, 75 

Muster Rolls, "183-190, 200, 207 

Necrology of the New-England Historic Gen- 
ealogical Society— 
Aldrich, Peleg Emory, 350 
Allen, Frederick Donne, 225 
Atherton, Samuel, 353 
Baldwin, Charles Candee, 222 
Bridge, Samuel James, 83 
Burnett, Joseph, 85 
Butler, Peter, 402 
Chipman, Richard Manning, 92 
Coburn, Ethan Nelson, 92 
Collin, William Edward, 351 
Converse, James When toil, 88 
Cornell, William Mason, 353 
Curtis, Daniel Bates, 357 
Eastman, Edmund 'fucker, 358 
Edwards, Try on, 353 
Foster, Dudley, 353 
Froudt, .lames Anthony, 82 
Gookin, Samuel Henry, 350 
Hill, Hamilton Andrews, 319 
Hincks, Edward Window, 87 
Horsford, Fben Norton,, S5 
Houghton, William Stevens, 357 
Jones, Charles Colc,ock, 89 



Index of Subjects. 



vn 



Necrology— 

Kimball, Henry Colman, 224 

Kimball, Mains.'Slfl 

Means, William Gordon, 358 

Miner, Alonzo Ames, 464 

Neill, Edward Dnllield.yi 

Patch, Ira Joseph, 354 

Toole, William Frederick, 89 

Prendergast, John Patrick, 352 

Proctor, Thomas Kmel'Son, 402 

Reynolds, GHndall, 222 

Russell, Samuel Hammond, 403 

Salhsbury, William Noel, 362 

Sallonstall., Lcverelt, 351 

Sticknev, Matthew Adams, 224 

Stone, Kben Francis, 220 

Timelier, Peter, 221 

Thurston, Ariel Slundish, 90 

Weld, Francis Minot, 83 

Weston, David Brainard, 84 

Whittemore, Bernard Bemis., 91 

Willso.n, Edmund Burke, 4(51 

Winthrop, Robert Charles, 81 
Newton, Query, 341 
Notes and Queries, 73, 208, 338, 453 

Obituary Notices, see Necrology and Biograph- 
ical Sketches. 
Odell, Query, 213 
Old York County (Me.) Records, 46 

Parke, Query, 455 

Paul, Query, 455 

Perry, Query, 74 

l'ixley, Query, 77 

Portraits, see Illustrations. 

Portraits in New Hampshire of Public Men 

and Others, 177 
Prentiss, Query, 457 
Prize Essay on the Development of Religious 

Liberty, 345 
Probate Courts in Massachusetts, 69 

Queries, 73, 210, 340, 455 

Ransom, Catherine, Query, 77 

Ravencl, Daniel, Memoir of, 297 

Recent Publication*, 102, 233, 305, 476 

Re). lies, 77,211,315,458 

Reunions- 
Barns, i.'.s 
Collins, 158 

Rhodes, Query, 213 

Rice and Wilcox, Query, 457 

Richards, Humphrey of Boston, Query, 455 

Roe, Query, 457 

Sadler and Crittenden, Query, 157 

Seven Success I ve( J en era! ions of Harvard Grad- 
uates, Saltonstall, 455 

Shawe, 0i 

Shepard, Query, 76 

Silsby, Query, 455 

Smith, Henry, Query, 344 

Snow Genealogy, 71, 202, 451 

Snow, Query, 73 

Society of Mayflower Descendants, Note, 310 

Some Dorchester Matters, 153 

Soule, Sisson, Bills, Manchester, Query, 343 

Stone, Ancestry of Gov. William of Mary- 
land, 314 

Tabular Pedigrees, see Illustrations. 

Taylor and Wright, Query, 211 

The Town History, lyi , 

Thomas, Gapt. John of Braintree, 172 

Thompson, Query, 455 

Town History In Preparation, Manchester, 

Mass., 459 
Trumbull, Query, .158 

United States Pensioners, Essex Co., Mass., 316 

Vlekcry, George, Query, 450 



Waters's Genealogical Gleanings In England, 
105, 237, 309, 481— 
Aldwyn, John (1081), 488 
Alvey, Richard (1039), 391 
Andrews, Benjamin (10«7),4S8 
Axtell, Ellyn (1003), 260 
Bannister, Francis (1625), 398 
Baskerville, Catherine (1070), 494 

Simon (1641), 494 
Batten, Edward (1638), 250 
Beawe, Pose (1579), 392 
Bell, Susan (1672), 482 
Bennett, Elisha (1727), 504 

Richard (1002), 404 
Bevys, Nicholas (1613), 491 
Llackaler, Philip (1708), 483 
Blick, William (1724 , 133 
Roadman, (iiles (1004), 49(3 
Bordman, Andrewe (1017), 497 
Borrodale, John (1007), 487 
Brent, Edward (1025), 510 
Brickenden, Mary (1088), 124 
Browne, Helena (1010), 497 

Moses (1688), 262 
Buckland, Matthew (1559),, 393 

. Richard (1558), 393 
Bull, Jonathan (1728), 513 
Burges, Joseph (1072), 505 
Thomas (1023), 240 
(1020), 241 
Burrell, William (1648), 501 
Cabot, Barbara (1777), 502 
Capen, James (1028), 489 
Carey, Walter (1023), 399 
Carter, James (1027), 204 
Carteret, George (1079), 369 
Gary, Alice (1000), 399 

Christopher (1026), 397 
Richard (1085), 400 
William (16r.4), 400 
Carye, Richard (1509), 390 
William (1572), 390 
(1572), 397 
Catcher, John (1631), 243 

William (1628), 242 
Chaplen, Moses (1009), 394 

William (1577), 258 
Chaplin, Kdmond (1641), 258 
Thomas, (1055), 259 
Ghoppyne, John (1017), 108 
Clarke, Raphe (1010), 390 
Cole, Anne (1660), fill 
John (1072), 512 
Roger (1628), 129 
Waller (1053), 490 
Conuers, John (1054), 374 
Cooke, Samuel (1042), 259 
Cooper, Mary (1700), 385 
Coquell, Mary (10 U), 137 
Cox, Thomas (1711). 375 
Coxe, Nicholas ( 17(0), 514 
Croft, Ralph (1050), 371 
Cutt, Richard (1682), 131 
Davenaunte, John (1590), 4S5 
Deane, Anne (1024), 382 
Rachell (1627), 383 
William (1585), 381 
Delawne, Gideon (1058), 238 
(1059), 237 
Drury, Anthony (1010), 105 
Egerton, Sarah (1024), 381 
Faneuil, Andrew (1738), 515 

Benjamin (1767), 515 
Fisher, Thomas (1013), 378 
Fitzpen ah. Phippen, George (1051), 244 
Gohle, William (1508), 205 
Gooding, Margaret (1023), 209 
Gould, John (1002), 200 
(1010), 207 
Judith (ln;.o),207 
Nathan (1011), 207 
Thomas (lf)5H),207 
Griffin, David (1079), 190 
Eliza (1689), 190 
Joan (1001), 495 



Index of Subjects 



Wators'a Genealogical Gleanings in Enghir.d- 
Gtmtng, VAcvlv (Kill), 25s 
tiimlon, Anno (1081), 112 

lJramnton (iOoo), \oh 
(1(5(59), 110 
John (1023), lot! 
(1079), 111 
Hackham, Agnes (1608), 133 
Hall, William (150ii), 487 
Halsted, Abraluuii (1051), 131 
lltuuor, It-iphe (1C15), ^00 
Irnmort', Susan (1010), 218 
Harrison, Nicholas (1(513), 485 
Man, Ann.' f 1(555), 51 1 

Hickman, William (1672), 512 
Jlil!, James (1621), 495 
Roger (16(57), 100 
Hit-chins, Samuel (1(579), 137 
Hobson, Henry (103(5), 390 
Hollinshed, John (loio),509 
Hunlock, Denham (1(177), 388 
Hunlocke, Christopher (1003), 392 
Francis (1070), 389 
Henry (101.'), 391 
Martha (1090), 389 
Irish, Zacharie (1072), 205 
Jackson, .Samuel (1(540), 2(53 
(1002), 387 
Johnson, Robert (1025), 370 
Jordaine, Joane (1640), 404 
John (1628), 402 
Jourdaine, John (1620), 402 
Jurdain, Elizabeth (1033), 403 

Ignatius (1010), 103 
Jurdaine, Elizabeth (1040), 494 

John (1588), 401 
Jnrdan, Jolin (1501), 491 
King, Peter (1058), 509 
Lee, Martha (1725), 203 

Philip (1054), 37(5 
Lewis, John (1727), 504 
Lloyd, James (1084), 503 

William (1075), 503 
Locke, Joan (1041), 12(5 
Lowe, John (1708), 404 
Mudockes, Richard (1000), 482 
Man, Thomas (1025), 480 
Marsh, (irace (1007), 371 
John (1027), 370 
Mercer, Daniel (1002), 238 
Michell, Willi a nj (1(5(53), 301 
Middleton, Philip (1050), 272 
Robert (1027), 270 
Thomas (1072), 271 
Mildmav, Amy (1070), 111 
Miles, Elinor (1504), 482 
Nauhton, Robert (1035), 508 
Kelson, Pnschall (1728), 513 
Nothwuv, Sarah (1041), 257 
Newton, John (1047), 384 
Niohnlls, Matthias (1(531), 251 
Nicholson, William (1710), 403 
Norciosse, Nathaniel (1002), 3s'5 
Nowell, Christopher (1057), 372 

John (1(538), 384 
Noves, Anne (1(558), 2(51 
Osboldston, Edward (1019), 387 
(1001), 388 

George (1045), 387 
Overton, Olive (1510), 481 
Owen, Robert (1015), 252 
Palmer, Edward (1024), 134 
Parker, Calthorpe (1618), 107 

Mercy (1030), 107 
Pemberton, Paid (1025), 248 

William (1500), 248 
Pickeringe, Edward (1023), 300 
Pierce, Mark (1050), 500 
Pitt, Mary (1034), 255 
Thomas (10 >7), 257 
William (1004), 252 
(1024), 253 
(1031), 254 
(1047), 257 



Watcrs's Goncaloglcal Gleanings In England- 

I'ittes, William (1502), 251 
I'layne, Apollo (1002), l<»51 
Pordago, Robert (1012), 374 
Pountes, John (1021), 510 
Priuulx, John (1008), 23S 
Priest, Thomas (1598), "00 
l'urefay, John (1570), 507 
Rand, Margaret (1625), 382 
Ravment, George (1051), 136 
Re'vell, Michael (1050), 388 
Rich, Elias (1710), 506 
Roberts, Anne (1672), 210 
.John (1005), 230 
Martin (1598), 239 
Robins, John (1027), 373 
Rockwell, Honor (1037), 270 
Scott, George (1018), 501 

John (1710), 483 
Sedloy, John (1532), 113 
(1581), 120 
Murtvn (1609), 121 
Nicholas (1571), 120 
William (1571), 120 
Severy, Edward (1004), 387 
. Sheppard, Thomas (1709), 505 
(1710), 500 
Shurt, George (1658), 135 
Slaughter, Elizabeth (104)), 250 
Smith, George (1728), 513 
Henry (1053), 400 
Thomas (1051), 136 
Snelling, Francis (1055), 499 
Thomas (1012), 400 
Sprague, Edward (1014), 204 
Steevens, Henry (1012), 200 
Stevenson, James, (1728), 506 
Stolion, June (1047), 247 
Stolyon, Thomas (1680), 247 
Sturman, Richard (1072), 512 * 
Sybada, Kempo (1050), 135 
Syms, Randal (1500), 485 
Taylor, John (1000), 120 

Thomas (1058), 126 
William (1050), 506 
Thomas, Sarah (1711), 404 
Thomson, George (1090) 271 

Maurice (1070), 271 
Thompson, Rowland (1002), 401 

Samuel (1008), 305 
Tindall, Anne (1020), 380 

Umphrey, (Kill), 379 
Tomlins, Richard (1037), 373 
Trafford, Ann (1788), 499 

Elizabeth (1788), 499 
Humphrey (1779) ,'498 
Thomas (1784), 498 
Traherne, William (1658), 220 
Trothewev, John (1020), 242 
Trethwv, Robert (102!), 240 
Tvce, William (1019), 272 
Tyndall, John (1530), 377 
(1010), 379 
Thomas (15S 0,378 
Welde, Edii.ond(10(is), 40(5 
Wells, Joan (1581), 205 
Wharton, Richard (1713), 514 
White als. Wampcrs. John (1079), 130 
Whithead, William (1023), 372 
Whittingham, John (1010), 383 
Willoughby, William (1051), 122 
(1058), 123 
Woodbury, John (1072), 249 
Woodward, Hezekiah (1075), 373 
Wyld, Daniel (1070), 394 
Wheeler and Baxter, Query, 344 
Wheelock, Query, 211 
Wild, Edward Augustus, 400 
Williams, Query, 212 

Family, Reply, 214 



Index of Subjects, 



IX 



Wills, Administrations and Abstracts- 
See also Waters's Gleanings 
Arrowsmyth, Richard (1508), 30 
Bent, Edith (1601), G7 
John (15*8), 07 
Kobert (1881), 67 
Dnvies, William (1035), 410 
Gaffeeld, Roger (1031), l'00 
Garefield, ThomaH (1001), 201 
Garleedc, Edward (1580) 300 
(iarfeeld, Hemic (1582), 800 
(iari'efld, Aqtiila (1005), 201 
Garfield, Robert (1507), 801 
William (1584), 800 
(hV.Ki), 800 
(1(5 Is), 803 
EHzabet.il (1571), 199 
Geyfeld, Hubert f 1568), 100 
Golding, John (1407), 417 
GradiVId Thomas (1557), 199 
Ilaynes, Ile/ekiah (Hi08), 804 
John (1070), 807 
(1002), 800 
Kinge, William (1055), -li»4 
Massye, .lames (1010), 81 
Mather, Geoffrey (150S), 80 
(1000), 80 
(1015), 81 
(1017), 31 
(1018), 32 
Sorocolde, James (1(520), 32 
(1032), 33 
R anile (1(532), 33 
Southwood, Barbara (1007), 422 
Thntmbnll, James (1070), 423 
Tlirmnblc, Itlchard (10(50), 124 
Townscnd, James (1080), 422 
Tremble, Johane (1054), 420 
Trombell, Maria (1010), 424 

William (1500), 423 
Trumbull, Francis (103b), 420 
Henry (1001), 421 
Mary (1004), 423 
Samuel (1050), 421 
(1608), 423 
Trumbell, Thomas (1702), 423 
Tnmible, Anthony (1074), 830 
Beatrice (1035), 327 
Christopher (1061), 82S 
Edward (1010), 423 
(1037),:;-'; 



Wills, Administrations und Abstracts 
Trumble, George (1881), 320 
(1606), 329 
James (1695), 423 
J ob n (1625), 327 
(1028), 11!) 
(1687), 828 
(1664), IL'1 
(1691), 422 
Leonard (1645), 328 
Margaret (1585), 326 
Hubert (1614), 423 
Thomas (1672), 330 
(1690), 331 
Trumbull, Alexander ( 1680), 424 
Andrew (1«78). 331 
Elizabeth (1681), 331 

Emanuel (160.",), 410 
George (1089), 422 
Johan (1570), 418 
Mark (1677), 330 
Mary (1681), 331 
Matthew (1008), 123 
Kobert (1677), 830 
Thomas (1557), 417 

(1560), 417 
William (1035), 420 

(1678), 422 

Turnball, Kalphe (1657), 421 
Turnbull, George (1649), 424 
John (1673), 422 
. (1690), 422 
Patrick (1605), 423 
Richard (1503) ,410 
Hoberti (1608), 124 
Tliouiiia ( 1503), 331 
Turnebull, Elizabeth (1581), 331 
lleughe (1566), 417 
John (1608), 331 
Katherine (1058) 421 
Thomas (1681;, 423 
W'ilfray (1657), 421 
WatmOUgh, Kobert (1620), 32 
Whitman, Samuel (1750), 174 
Wood, Josin.ll, Query, 76 

York Count v (Me.) Deeds, Note, 200 
Young, Hev. Nathan, Query, :!42 





S~^ui,£s^ 



£ 



/ 



NEW-ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
REGISTER. 



JANUARY, 1895. 



MEMOIR OF THE HON. CHARLES H. BELL, LL.D. 

By the Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, D.I). 

Charles Henry Bell was born in Chester, New Hampshire, 
on the eighteenth day of November, 1823, and died in Exeter in 
the same State on the eleventh day of November, 1893. The emi- 
grant ancestor of the family, John Bell, who was born in Ireland 
in 1679, but of Scotch descent, settled in Londonderry, New Hamp- 
shire, in 1720. He was one of the original grantees of London- 
derry, and an active and foremost citizen in the affairs of the town. 
His son John, of the second generation in this country, held many 
local offices, was a delegate to the first constitutional convention of 
the State, a Representative and a Senator in the legislature for 
several years, an officer of the church to which he belonged, a 
devout Christian, of good judgment and sterling integrity. John, 
of the third generation, the father of the subject of this sketch, was 
a prosperous and successful man of business, first in Derry, New 
Hampshire, and subsequently in Chester in the same State. He 
was early a member of the House of Representatives, of the Senate, 
of the Governor's Council for several years, sheriff of the county, 
and was Governor of the State in 1828. 

Charles Henry Bell in his early youth had the best opportunities 
for education which New England at that time afforded. At the 
age of twelve years he was entered as a student of Pembroke 
Academy. Here he remained two years. In 1837 he became a 
member of Phillips Academy, in Exeter, but the next year he re- 
turned to Pembroke where he completed his preparation for college. 

He entered Dartmouth College in 1838, then not fifteen years 
of age. His brother had entered in 1837, which furnished a reason 
for placing the younger brother in college at that early age. The 
health of the elder became delicate, and after the expiration of the 
autumn term of 1838, the two young men were withdrawn, and 
their connection with the College severed for the time being. During 
the next two years Charles Henry remained, for the most part, at 
vol. xlix. 2 > 



10 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

his home in Chester, devoting enough time to study to keep his 
preparations for college fresh in mind, while the residue he gave to 
such desultory reading and writing as suited his inclinations and 
taste. Some months, however, of this period, probably in the last 
part of 18,'W and early part of 1840, he devoted to the study of 
civil engineering, under the direction of James Ilayward, Esq., 
whose office was in Joy's Building in Boston. 

In 1840 he re-entered Dartmouth College, joining the freshman 
class, then past sixteen years of age. He was a faithful and con- 
scientious student, acquitting himself honorably in all departments, 
always ranking among the best third of his class ; but he did not 
aspire to high attainment in exact scholarship, as ambitious young 
men often do. Impelled by an extraordinary love of knowledge, 
he was, during these years, an insatiate reader, and made himself 
familiar with the whole circle of English classics and with the best 
writers on both sides of the Atlantic. 

A\ nile an undergraduate he became deeply interested in military 
affairs, both in the science and in the manual of the soldier. The 
students of Dartmouth at that time were required by law to muster 
annually, as a part of the militia of the State. They were, how- 
ever, permitted to form a company by themselves, which was called 
the Dartmouth Phalanx. This company was made up of picked 
men from the whole college, and they were naturally men who had 
a taste, if not for military science, at least for military drill. The 
uniform of the officers was a black dress-coat, white vest, and white 
pantaloons. The coat was trimmed with gold lace, the skirt being 
lined with white satin. The hat was a common beaver, bearing a 
cockade . The three officers wore at the side a highly decorated sword. 
The dress of the men was likewise a black dress-coat and white pan- 
taloons, with knapsack, canteen, cartridge box and bayonet sheath, 
of approved pattern and make. While this uniform was sober and 
modest, it was nevertheless dignified and effective, and in all respects 
appropriate to a company of scholars. Under the discipline of - a 
daily morning and evening drill, the Phalanx attained an excellence 
unknown outside of a military school. It became the pride of the 
college and the pride of the State. Mr. Bell was appointed captain 
of this company on the 22d of April, 1843, and retired from office on 
the 18th of April, 1844, a short time before his graduation from the 
college. His natural taste for military knowledge was cultivated and 
developed by the constant exercise of the company in the manual, and 
by the reading of treatises of a far wider scope than the exigencies 
of the case required. These studies, elementary indeed, became a not 
unimportant branch of his education, and were valuable to him in 
many ways, practically so when in after years, in Exeter, he was 
commander of the Sullivan Guards, and still later, when as Gover- 
nor, he held an official relation to all the military organizations of 
the State. 



1895.] Charles Henry Bell. 1 1 

On leaving college Mr. Bell immediately began the study of law 
in the office of the Hon. James Bell of Exeter, who was, perhaps, 
the most eminent lawyer at that time at the New Hampshire bar. 
He could not have chosen a better preceptor. Learned, dignified 
and judicious, careful and systematic, his office furnished a school 
of patient investigation, thoroughness and the best practical work. 
After two years the Hon. James Bell removed from Exeter, and 
Mr. Bell- completed his studies under the direction of the Hon. 
Samuel Dana Bell, an able lawyer, and subsequently Chief Justice 
of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire. 

He was admitted to the bar in 1847, and began the practice of 
his profession in Chester, the place of his birth, and where his 
mother after the death of his father continued to reside. This 
beautiful town had many attractions in itself, and many dear asso- 
ciations, but it offered little encouragement to the aspirations of a 
young lawyer. 

In 184 l J Mr. Bell entered into a partnership with Nathaniel Wells 
of Somersworth, who for some years had been conducting an im- 
portant law business in the village of Great Falls in that town. 
Here Mr. Bell practically began his career as a lawyer. Mr. AYells 
was distinguished as a counsellor, for his office practice and his able 
and thorough preparation of cases for argument, but he rarely 
presented his own cases in court. In this new relation, Mr. Bell 
found an ample field for obtaining facility and skill, which only 
come of experience, in presenting to courts and juries questions of 
fact or of law. This department of his profession he here culti- 
vated with assiduity and success. 

In 1854 Mr. Hell removed to Exeter, where he found a larger 
field ami a more satisfactory clientage. It not only furnished a 
wider scope for legal knowledge and talent, but it was the centre 
of a cultivated and refined society. The seat of Phillips Academy, 
unsurpassed by any other institution of the same class in New 
England, amply equipped with instructors of the best scholarship 
and varied learning, it had long before attracted other residents of 
congenial tastes and scholarly habits. Here Mr. Bell was happy 
to make his home, and here he passed the remaining years of his 
life. 

In 1856 he was appointed solicitor of Rockingham county. 
This office he continued to discharge for the period of ten years, 
and at the same time he conducted an important civil business both 
in his office and in the courts. As a lawyer and an advocate, Mr. 
Bell had a profound distaste for the vulgar hectoring and black- 
guardism in which members of the profession, even of distinction, 
sometimes indulge. He placed himself outside and above this by 
a manner eminently his own. A* all times his conduct to witnesses, 
to the jury, to the court and to the opposing counsel was serious, 
courteous, respectful and dignified. From this bearing and courtesy 



12 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

to all in the court room, no personalities or ill manners could tempt 
him for a moment to depart. This method came not as the result 
of studied art and self-discipline* but as the natural offspring of a 
high sense of propriety and an innate sense of justice. lie re- 
garded every trial before the courts, in which he was engaged, 
simply as a legal investigation, whose function was to draw out and 
establish justice between man and man as interpreted by law and 
evidence. lie wanted no more, he sought for no less. His method 
was a great power with juries and with courts. He possessed their 
confidence, and this confidence he never misled or betrayed. He 
was justly regarded by his compeers as an able lawyer and a skilful 
advocate. 

A few sentences from the sketch of Mr. Bell contained in' the 
"Bench and Bar," contributed by Judge Jeremiah Smith, LL.D., 
now Story professor in the Harvard Law School, and for some years 
on the bench of the Supreme Court of New Hampshire, will convey 
his estimate of him both as an advocate and a lawyer : 

His arguments were generally brief but clear. He did not waste his own 
time or the time of the court. Almost never did he utter a superfluous 
sentence, and seldom an unnecessary word. " Clearness of statement," it 
has been well said, "is the great power at the bar." Mr. Bell possessed 
this faculty in a remarkable degree. His oral arguments had the crystal- 
like clearness which was so marked a characteristic of the written opinions 
of his cousin, the late Chief Justice Samuel D. Bell. It is safe to say he 
never sat down without making all his points fully understood. One great 
charm of Mr. Bell's speeches consisted in his admirable command of lan- 
guage. He always used the right word in the right place His 

experience with juries proves that courtesy and fairness are not insuperable 
obstacles to success, and that a man of ability and integrity can obtain 
verdicts without resorting to any small artifices or objectionable methods. 
He did not fawn upon jurors or flatter them. He did not introduce irre- 
levant topics for the sake of exciting sympathy for his client, or prejudice 
against his opponent. Hut his straightforward method of trying a case was 

more effective than the flank movements which are sometimes adopted 

It was probably the general opinion of Mr. Bell's friends that, though he 
was successful at the bar, yet the more appropriate place for him was the 
bench, where two near kinsmen had served with distinction. He certainly 
possessed marked qualifications for that position; a competent knowledge of 
law, practical experience, tact, sound sense, a dignified presence and a 

power of controlling men Had he remained in active practice, he 

must ere long have been tendered a judgeship. 

To these statements of Judge Smith, we are tempted to add the 
following brief sentence from a private note of Judge Charles Doe, 
LL.D., the present Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New 
Hampshire : 

A mind more capable of grasping, mastering and presenting legal ques- 
tions, quickly, clearly and thoroughly, I have never known. 















. 





















1895.] , Charles Henry Bell 13 

In dealing with legal principles and their practical application, 
Mr. Bell took great pleasure, but the conflict and wrangling of the 
court-room were alien to his nature and foreign to his tastes. After 
twenty-one year's experience, in 1868, lie retired from active prac- 
tice at the bar, and devoted himself to more congenial pursuits. 
After this period, however, he was often appointed a referee, whose 
duties he personally enjoyed, and winch he discharged with unusual 
satisfaction to all parties. His findings, we have been informed on 
good authority, were without an exception approved by the courts, 
and, we think, no appeal from Ins decisions was ever made on points 
of law, or if made was not sustained. 

In 1858, 1859, 1860, 1872 and 1873, Mr. Bell represented 
Exeter in the legislature of the State. He was a State Senator in 
1863 and 186-1. He was Speaker of the House in 1860, and 
President of the Senate in 1864. In his first year in the House he 
was made chairman of the judiciary committee, a very unusual honor 
to a young member. In the later years of his membership he was 
the acknowledged leader of the House, and one of the most useful 
and influential of its members. 

In 1879, by the appointment of the governor, lie became a mem- 
ber of the United States Senate, to fill a vacancy until an election 
in the following June. 

He was governor of New Hampshire for a term of two years from 
June, 1881 to June, 1883. In his political affinities, Governor 
Bell was a republican from the organization of that party. He was, 
however, never a politician in the modern vulgar sense of the word. 
He sought no political advancement. The office sought him, not 
he the office, lie was, however, thoroughly loyal to his principles 
and to his party. When it called him to a public service and 
pledged him its support, and he had accepted its pledges, he occu- 
pied a new relation. If lie had any personal ambition, it was closely 
bound up with the success of the party. He stated publicly and 
privately, frankly, clearly and fully the principles and spirit that 
would animate, shape and control his administration. This frank- 
ness was doubtless a potent cause of his popularity. He adminis- 
tered the trusts committed to him under the dictates of a deliberate 
and well informed judgment. His administration bore the test of 
time and experience. His wisdom was justified by events. The 
citizens trusted him and were never deceived. When he was nomi- 
nated for governor of the State by the republican party of New 
Hampshire, it was by acclamation. There was no dissenting voice. 
His election, subsequeutly, we are informed, was by the largest 
number of votes ever cast for a governor in the State of New Hamp- 
shire. He discharged the duties of the office with dignity, im- 
partiality and wisdom, and we may add with the approbation and 
satisfaction of all parties within his jurisdiction. 

In 1889 Mr. Bell completed his public service in the interest of 
vol. xlix. 2* 



14 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

the State by presiding over a convention, called to revise its Con- 
stitution and adapt it to the expanding growth of the State in 
population and wealth. It was an important and influential posi- 
tion to occupy, and he was highly gratified to be honored in being 
called to preside over a political body of such distinction and dignity. 
It was a courteous testimony of confidence and respect from his 
fellow citizens, and a pleasant rounding off and completion of his 
political career. 

Mr. Bell took an active personal interest in education in all its 
stages, branches and instrumentalities ; in schools, lyceums and 
libraries. While he was governor of the State, he was a trustee, 
ex-officio, of Dartmouth College, and was a constant and punctual 
attendant upon the deliberations of the Board. 

He was an active member, from the start, of the board of trus-, 
tees of the seminary, established in Exeter by the munificent legacy 
of William Robinson, a native of Exeter, but at the time of his 
death a citizen of Augusta, Georgia. The endowment was about 
$250,000, and by the provisions of the will, established a school 
for girls only, thus supplementing the interests of education in 
Exeter by furnishing for girls what Dr. John Phillips had done 
for boys in the later years of the preceding century. During the 
period between the signing of the will and its execution, a great 
depression of values had taken place, and it was found that Mr. 
Robinson's family was not as generously provided for as the testator 
had intended. Mr. Bell, and another ir?mbcr of a committee 
appointed by the town, visited Mrs. Robinson in Georgia, and after 
a thorough investigation made an adjustment which was entirely 
satisfactory. A plan for the organization of the school was elabor- 
ated with much care, suitable action was taken by the legislature, 
and in 1867 the school was put into operation. In all this Mr. 
Bell took an active and leading part. On the fourth day of July, 
1808, he laid the corner-stone of the school building of the semi- 
nary, with elaborate Masonic ceremonies, on which occasion he de- 
livered a discourse in which after a rapid glance at the educational 
interests of the town from the beginning down to the present time, 
he closed with a graceful and eloquent peroration on the breadth 
and extent of this noble endowment. Mr. Bell served on the board 
of trustees of the Robinson Seminary for the period of ten years, 
when he resigned. 

Jn 187!) he was made a trustee of Phillips Exeter Academy, 
which office he continued to hold, and was president of the Board 
at the time of his death. The high character of this school, the 
large number of its scholars and the distinguished ability required 
in its teachers, and the consequent and imperative importance of 
keeping every part of the institution in a sound and healthy condi- 
tion, made the responsibilities of the trustees, especially of those 
resident in the town, constant, and often delicate and perplexing. 



1895.] Charles Henry Bell. 15 

Mr. Bell's eminently judicial mind, his calm and even temper, his 
wise forethought, his care to know thoroughly every question that 
required deliberation, made him during all these years a useful and 
influential trustee of the Academy. From the meetings of the 
Board, sometimes held in Exeter and sometimes in Boston, he was 
rarely, if ever, absent. 

Since his death, Mr. Charles Marseilles of Exeter has presented 
to the Board of Trustees for the Academy Gallery a crayon portrait 
of Governor Bell executed by the distinguished artist, William 
Kurtz of New York. 

Mr. Bell wrote and delivered numerous discourses on education 
in its various relations to human progress, which remain in manu- 
script. Among others a discourse on "the comparative advantages 
of the Lyceum at Athens in ancient Greece and the Lyceums of 
our own country " ; one on " the changes in the methods of instruc- 
tion in the last half century in our New England schools" ; and an- 
other on "the high aims and lofty purposes that ought to animate 
and control the scholar." The treatment of these and kindred sub- 
jects occupied such hours as he could spare from the duties of an 
exacting profession. 

After his retirement from the bar in 18G8 Mr. Bell had ample 
leisure for such occupations and pursuits as were most agreeable to 
his inclinations and tastes. He did not announce to others, or 
even propose to himself, a literary career. He simply did in the 
field of literature whatever seemed to have obvious claims upon his 
attention. In nearly every undertaking there was some plain personal 
;r other adequate reason for its performance by him rather than by any 
one else. He engaged in no work that was trivial or unimportant ; 
neither did he wait for some great subject to present itself, in the 
treatment of which he might anticipate personal distinction and 
fame. He plainly acted on the excellent maxim, "a wise man will 
do always and thoroughly the duty that lies nearest to him." 

Mr. Bell's first literary venture was the Life of William M. 
Richardson, LL.D., late Chief Justice of the Superior Court in 
New Hampshire. This little twelvemo volume of 90 pages was 
published in March, 1839, only four, months after the author had 
completed fifteen years of his age. While it contains the marks of 
a youthful hand, it nevertheless contains a clear and systematic 
compendium of the life and career of its distinguished subject. It 
remained for more than half a century a valuable memorial of a man 
of singular merit, of judicial ability and learning, and has not even 
now been superseded, unless by the more compact and mature con- 
tribution by the same author, in his "Bench and Bar" of New 
Hampshire. 

On the 10th of June, 18G9, Mr, Bell, by invitation, delivered an 
oration in Deny, New Hampshire, at the 150th Anniversary of the 
Settlement of Old Nutfield, comprising the towns of Londonderry, 



16 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

Deny, Windham, and parts of Manchester, Hudson and Salem. 
The subject of this discourse is the character of the early settlers of 
Londonderry and the influence of the settlement upon the com- 
munity. It is not, therefore, an historical sketch, hut an illustration 
of these two themes hy a general statement of the history of the 
colonists, the trials and difficulties through which they passed, the 
dangers of a frontier settlement in the depths of a primeval forest, 
the education of their children and the maintenance of their religious 
institutions ; their hardy and robust physiques, their intellectual 
strength and vigor, their stern, unbending religious principle, the 
great achievements of many of their descendants, their prudence, 
their industry, their sound judgment and self-reliance ; all these 
points are discussed with great fullness, but nevertheless without 
any invidious distinction or eulogy of individuals, with the single 
exception of a few resolute and brave men, who, in the wars of the 
country, covered themselves and their names with glory by their 
noble and heroic conduct. 

Mr. Bell published in .1871 an octavo volume of seventy-three 
pages, entitled tf Men and Things of Exeter, New Hampshire." 
This historical brochure was replete with interest to the dweller in 
Exeter. It described the early settlement of the town ; recounted 
many striking colonial events ; the stirring occurrences of the revo- 
lution ; the outbreak of the popular feelings at different times and 
their causes ; the visit of the celebrated English evangelist, White- 
field, in 1770, and that of Washington in 1789 ; the religious es- 
tablishments of the town from the be<nnnin£, and the character and 
influence of their various ministers down to the present time. 

The same year, on the 18th of March, 1871, Mr. Bell delivered 
a discourse in Boston, on the invitation of the New-England 
Historic; Genealogical Society, at the dedication of the Society's 
House. It was published by the Society with the proceedings on 
the occasion. 

The discourse recites compactly and clearly the growth in this 
country of historical sentiment and interest during the last gen- 
eration ; it points to the patronage of the government, its publi- 
cation of certain historical works at the public cost and its sanction 
by the people. It informs us that new workers are constantly coming 
into the field, historical libraries are multiplying, and memorials of 
the past are brought together to illustrate its history. We are re- 
minded of the unexampled riches and extent of the field and the 
prolific sources of historical material. Dangers are pointed out. 
Hasty and superficial work is deprecated. Faithful and conscien- 
tious work is already everywhere recognized and appreciated, and 
a brilliant career in the future is predicted for the able, broad- 
minded and accomplished historian. 

In 1873 Mr. Bell delivered an address before the New Hampshire 
Historical Society, being the semi-centennial anniversary of the 



























. 















1895.] Charles Henry Bell. 17 

founding of the Society and the 250th anniversary of the settle- 
ment of New Hampshire. In this discourse is sketched an outline 
of New Hampshire's early colonial history, a brief mention of its 
organization as a State, the birth of the Historical Society, its dis- 
tinguished early members and workers, its special labors and 
achievements in the past, and the broad and inviting domain that 
stretches out for its occupation and cultivation in the future. 

Mr. Bell '; published a pamphlet entitled "Exeter in 177G. 
Sketches of an old New Hampshire town as it was a hundred years 
ago. Prepared for the Ladies' Centennial Levee held in Exeter, 
February 22, 1876." The title of this paper explains its purpose. 
The limits of the little village as it was in 1776 are defined ; the old 
houses, public and private, are described; the methods of business, 
the customs and habits of the people are pictured with the personal 
character of the prominent men, enlivened by numerous illustrative 
incidents and anecdotes. 

The same year an important volume was issued, entitled "John 
Wheelwright, his writings, including his fast day sermon, 1637, 
and his Mercurius Americanus, 1645, with a paper upon the 
genuineness of the Indian Deed of 1629, and a Memoir." This 
volume, published by the Prince Society in 1876, is one of the 
series of its valuable historical publications. It is a small quarto of 
253 pages. The memoir by Mr. Bell is the first complete biography 
of the Kev. John Wheelwright ever published. It was carefully 
prepared, largely from old manuscript records, after the most 
thorough researches, and is an important contribution to New 
England history. The paper on the Indian deed of 1629 presents 
clearly and fully the arguments for and against the genuineness of 
the document. At the time of the publication of this volume in 
1876, no evidence had been produced proving that Wheelwright was 
not in this country in 1629 ; and if he were here, there was a strong 
probability that the deed was genuine. Subsequently, records were 
found establishing the fact that he was in England at the time of 
the alleged execution of the deed. This rendered it nearly certain 
that the instrument was a fabrication. Mr. Bell made this known 
in a letter published in the New-England Historical and Genea- 
logical Register for July, 1891. A careful examination of Mr. 
Bell's treatment of the subject will show how completely he was 
able to see all sides of a difficult and controverted subject. 

In the month of July, 1876, Mr. Bell, accompanied by his 
family, made a voyage to Europe, where he passed a year, returning 
in July, 1877. His travels extended to England, Ireland, Scot- 
land, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Italy, passing 
several weeks in the great cities and central points of interest in 
each of these countries. In this period he not only visited the many 
objects and places of antiquarian and historic interest and fame which 
Tell in his way, but he made a survey, more or less satisfactory, 




























' 



' 












18 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

of the finest existing works of art, in painting, sculpture and 
architecture. 

In the scries of Memorial Biographies published by the New- 
England His toris** Genealogical Society, Mr. Bell contributed in 

1880 a memoir of Daniel Webster. An outline of Mr. Webster's 
whole life is compressed, in this paper, into twenty pages. Jt pre- 
sents, of course, only the prominent and striking incidents of his 
extraordinary career. Its brevity is characteristic of the author's 
method, and illustrates his style, at once concise and comprehensive. 
One great event passes so easily and naturally into another that 
this brief summary has the appearance of a complete and finished 
whole. We have seen no better epitome of Mr. Webster's life. 

The same year, Mr. Bell delivered a discourse before the Alumni 
Association of Dartmouth College, in memory of the Hon. Ira 
Perley, LL.D., late Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court 
of New Hampshire. This was one of a series of discourses de- 
livered at the request of the alumni in honor of graduates of that 
institution who were distinguished injudicial stations. The writers 
were limited as to time, and this, as was the brief paper on Mr. 
Webster, is an illustration of succinctness and completeness com- 
bined, and is a finely drawn outline of the character and career of 
that remarkable scholar and jurist, who in ability is ranked by Mr. 
Bell "with our Marshalls, our Parsonses and our Kents." 

In 1881, at the anniversary of the New Hampshire Alpha of the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society at Dartmouth College, Mr. Bell delivered 
an oration which was published by the Society. The subject was, 
"The A\ r orship of Success." He pointed out that in this country 
the avenues to success are open to all, and that the struggle for it 
is excessive and undiscriminating. The means of attaining it arc 
often unworthy and debasing. They cloud the moral vision, warp 
the judgment and obliterate the distinction between right and 
wrong. There is a noble and an ignoble ambition. The passion for 
wealth, fame and power should be limited, and subordinated to a 
high moral purpose. Honest labor is dignified and noble. "It is 
not the sphere of one's work, but the work one does in his sphere, 
that determines his rank as a benefactor of the world." The edu- 
cated class can do much to free society from ignorant pretention and 
unworthy ambitions, from the moral obliquity that blindly worships 
unworthy success. 

Mr. Bell published in 1883 an octavo volume of somewhat more 
than a hundred pages, entitled "Phillips Exeter Academy in New 
Hampshire." 

It contains a complete outline of the history of the Academy from 
the beginning, a full memoir of Dr. John Phillips, the founder, the 
design of the Academy as indicated by its charter, some account of 
its distinguished preceptors, and mucn detail relating to the changes, 
progress and growth of the institution. The volume contains a 









. 















1805.] Charles Henry Bell. 19 

complete and authentic list of the trustees and teachers from 1781 
to 1883. 

In 1885 Mr. Bell wrote a memoir of the late Dr. John Taylor 
Gilman of Portland, Maine, which was privately printed. 

It was intended to put upon record the estimate, both public and 
private, of the character and career of this distinguished physician, 
for the gratification of his family and friends. The story of his life, 
domestic and professional, in this pamphlet of thirty-six pages, is 
gracefully told. 

Mr. Bell delivered an address in Exeter, June 7, 1888, on the 
two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of the town, 
entitled "Exeter Quarter- Millennial." The period treated by this 
discourse is divided into five sections, each covering fifty years. 
While it is the principal aim of the address to show how Exeter 
discharged its duties as a town, how it met its obligations to the 
State of .New Hampshire and to the general government, at the 
same time it gives much information of a local character, such as 
its contributions in men and money and influence in the several 
wars through which the country has passed, and the distinguished 
citizens who took part in these numerous conflicts. It is a purely 
historical document, and was well adapted to the very interesting 
occasion for which it was prepared. 

The same year, 1888, Mr. Bell published "The History of the 
Town of Exeter, New Hampshire." It is an octavo volume of more 
than 550 pages. The subject of the work is treated topically and 
not chronologically. The character and career of the Rev. John 
Wheelwright, the founder of the town, the Exeter combination and 
the allotment of lands, are fully delineated. The religious societies, 
the Indian and French wars, the revolution and other wars, schools 
and academies, the press, manufactures, burial places, ornamental 
trees, old houses, prominent families, lawyers and medical men ; 
all these are treated as distinct and separate subjects, a method un- 
usual, but which oilers nevertheless some important advantages. 
The gathering together of the material of this large volume, the 
organizing and marshalling its scattered fragments into form for 
the reader, was the patient work of many years, and it must remain 
an indestructible monument to Mr. Bell's loyalty and devotion to the 
interests of the town, where he passed so many happy and useful 
years. 

At the anniversary of the Bunker Hill Monument Association 
on the 17th of June, 1891, Mr. Bell, by invitation of the Associa- 
tion, delivered a discourse on the battle of Bunker Hill, in which 
he points out the particular part performed by the New Hampshire 
troops. The history of the whole battle is outlined with great 
clearness, but the part taken by the New Hampshire regiments is 
described with rare distinctness and fulness, and on evidence which 
admits of no contradiction. New Hampshire' had waited too long 



20 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

for a writer competent to perform this valuable service. To his 
graphic description of the action, Mr. Bell gives brief memoirs of 
the prominent New Hampshire men who were engaged in this re- 
nowned conflict. 

The last work published by Mr. Bell is the "Bench and Bar of 
New Hampshire." It is an octavo volume of 795 pages, and bears 
the imprint of 1894. It contains memoirs of eighty judges of the 
highest courts of the Province and State, and memoirs of seven 
hundred and ninety-one lawyers, who had practised their profession 
in New Hampshire. In addition to these the volume contains the 
names of seven hundred and eleven lawyers now living, who have at 
some period been in practice within the limits of the State. The 
work had just reached its completion, and was nearly through the 
press, when the author was suddenly summoned away by death. 
An index was added by the publisher, and a few other accessories 
by Mrs. Bell. In a literary point of view, in the extent and com- 
pleteness of the work, tins is the magnum opus of all the author's 
publications, 'flic collection of the material for even brief sketches 
of eight hundred and seventy-one judges and lawyers could not but 
occupy the vigilant thought and assiduous labor of years. Each of 
the sketches is complete in itself, and is greater or less in extent 
according to the material accessible and the prominence and im- 
portance of the subject. There are certain characteristics or lines 
in the career of men in the same profession which are similar, and 
sometimes seem to be almost identical. The reader of these sketches 
will, we think, be surprised nevertheless to see how widely one 
sketch differs from another. The skill and ingenuity of the author 
have caused the narratives to spring up and take shape from those 
elements which are personal and peculiar, and consequently each 
narrative is different from all others, and has a coloring, freshness 
and individuality of its own. Many of the sketches are illustrated 
and enlivened by anecdotes and incidents characteristic of the men 
and of the times. We think it no exaggeration to say that this 
volume is the richest and most valuable contribution to the history 
of New Hampshire which has been made in the present century. 
In the preface the author says, "The preparation of this work has 
been to me a labor of love, and I now offer it in partial satisfaction 
of the debt I owe to a noble profession." 

Subsequently to 1868, after his retirement from the bar, in addi- 
tion to the preparation for the press of the numerous publications to 
which we have referred, Mr. Bell gave much of his leisure to vari- 
ous historical and atiquarian studies. The early colonial history of 
New England, and of New Hampshire in particular, always claimed 
an en&rossinj; interest. He made himself familiar with its outlines 
and its important details. He appreciated the value and importance 
of getting at the heart and core of history, and to do this he not 
only studied from original sources the habits, customs, education 






1895.] ' Charles Henry Bell. 21 

and religion of the people, but the motives and springs of aetion 
which animated and controlled their rulers. With the governors 
and lesser magistrates, the leading men in all grades of civil and 
military affairs, their power and method of using it, he became in- 
timately acquainted, lie carried the same method into the study 
of the American revolution and the history of the United States. 
Coordinate to these studies, or as a supplemennt to them, he made 
collections of autograph letters and engraved portraits, sometimes 
adding an engraved representation of the home of the subject, or a 
brief sketch of his life in print. Each one of them was an object 
lesson in history. Around them clustered by a law of association 
the incidents and events of a whole career, or a whole life. They 
were gathered into groups in order to illustrate some period or great 
event in history. Mr. Hell made a large number of these illustra- 
tive collections. One group included the distinguished characters 
who played an active and important part in the period immediately 
preceding the American revolution; another included Washington 
and those most closely associated with him ; a third, the distinguished 
men in any way connected with General Burgoyne and his cam- 
paign ; in like manner those who figured in the siege of Boston 
and in the capture of Yorktown. Several other groups were formed 
not less interesting and important. Besides these, Mr. Bell took 
great pleasure, as a pastime and an historical study, in illustrating 
in the same way his History of Exeter, his Life of John Wheel- 
wright, Sparks's Life of Washington,* Belknap's History of New 
Hampshire, and several other smaller works. This combination of 
study and amusement not only absorbed agreeably many leisure 
hours, hut it served to daguerreotype upon the mind men and events 
in a way never to be effaced. Of those whose autograph letters 
and portraits he deemed worthy of preservation, he obtained from 
all accessible sources a distinct and full knowledge. There was 
scarcely a general or regiment a 1 officer in the Revolutionary war, 
of whose value ami importance in the service he had not arrived at 
an accurate and distinct opinion. 

In these studies, in which taste and pleasure and intellectual profit 
were so happily combined, Mrs. Bell was always a sympathizing 
co-worker, and did herself much interesting and valuable coordinate 
work. 

Mr, Bell made a collection, to which he gave his attention for 
many years, of books and pamphlets printed in Exeter. He ob- 
tained two hundred and ten titles of these imprints alone, mostly 
published before 1840. This collection he bequeathed to the town 
library, in which he had always taken an active interest. At the 
time of bis death he was chairman of a committee appointed by the 
town for the erection of a library building. In this building, since 
completed, we learn that a special book-case has been set apart for 
vol. xlix. 3 



22 Charles Henry Bell. [Jan. 

the safe-keeping of the Exeter imprints, and as a memorial of the 
giver. 

lie also made a similar and much larger collection, which lie pre- 
sented to the New Hampshire Historical Society. It contains 
eleven hundred and five volumes and about one thousand pamph- 
lets. It was made on a definite and systematic plan. It comprises 
three classes : first, publications printed in New Hampshire ; second, 
those by New Hampshire authors but printed elsewhere ; third, such 
other publications as are in some special manner connected with 
the interests or history of New Hampshire. This collection, thus 
brought together, is unique, and its importance and historical value, 
particularly as a bibliography of New Hampshire, can hardly be 
over-estimated. AVe learn that it is very properly kept in a separate 
apartment of the library, exclusively appropriated to its use, on 
which is inscribed the Bell Alcove. 

For many years he was assiduous in collecting an historical lib- 
rary for his personal use. No description of it can be attempted 
in these pages. It will suffice to say that the collection constitutes 
not only a very complete working historical library, but is likewise 
rich in rare and valuable Americana. 

Mr. Bell gave some attention to numismatics, especially to 
American medals and coins. Of the colonial and United States 
coins and paper money he made a valuable collection. 

Besides his other occupations he was a voluminous contributor 
to the journals of the day on many important and interesting sub- 
jects. Some of these papers might well have been noticed in these 
pages did space allow.* 

For twenty-five years, with the exception of one year abroad, 
Mr. Bell passed his summers at the seashore in his cottage at Little 
Boar's Head. He took a leading interest in the local affairs of the 
place, and was president of its "Village Improvement Society" 
from its organization. His commanding and dignified presence 
will not soon be forgotten by those who resort to that quiet and 
attractive shore. 

In social life Mr. Bell was somewhat reticent, especially in mat- 
ters relating to himself, modest, and even diffident. There was a 
subtle magnetism in some way connected with his personality which 
drew others to him as by an invisible cord. He rarely indulged in 
what is commonly called " small talk," but was courteous and 
cordial, a ready listener and an unusually good conversationist. 
lie did not expand and adorn his subject with figures of speech, or 
the flowers of rhetoric, but gave the pith and core of the subject in 

* The following are some of them : Remarks before the New Hampshire Historical So- 
ciety on the presentation of the Webster papers by the Hon. Peter Harvey. The vindica- 
tion of Gen. John Sullivan. Remarks at a meeting of the citizens of Exeter, April 19, 1865, 
on Abraham Lincoln. A sketch of the life of the late Commodore John Codings Long. 
Biographical notice of the Hon. Samuel D. Bell. 



1805.] •• . Charles Henry Bell. 23 



hand in clear," direct and graceful language. lie charmed his 
hearers by showing them the richness of pure, simple, unadorned 
truth. In private circles and with his most intimate friends lie 
often indulged in a playful humor, and occasional flashes of wit, 
but this propensity, dangerous when given a free rein, was always 
under restraint, and rarely appeared in his intercourse with general 
society, or indeed in any of his published writings. 

The attractions of home were dear to him. Within its precincts 
centred his supreme happiness. It was to him all that the poets 
have made it : 

"The abode 
Of love, of joy, of peace and comfort, where, 
Supporting and supported, polish'd friends 
And dear relations mingle into bliss." 

Dartmouth College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of 
Laws in 1881. 

Mr. Bell was a member of many Historical Associations. The 
New Hampshire Historical Society was nearest his heart, and to it 
he devoted his best thought and unwearied labor. He became a 
member in 1853, thus giving to.it the active service of forty years. 
He was president of the Society nineteen years, from June, 18(38, 
till his resignation in 1887. Not only did he enrich it by the large 
gift of selected volumes, to which we have already referred, but he 
attracted gifts to it from many sources by his discreet and wise 
suggestions, and by the confidence in its purpose and administration 
which he everywhere inspired. He was a vice-president of the 
Prince Society, and was a member of its Council twenty-one years. 
He edited one of its publications, and was always an active and in- 
fluential member of its Council. To the iS T ew-England Historic 
Genealogical Society, of which he was a member twenty-three years, 
he contributed from time to time valuable historical papers. He was 
a member of the American Antiquarian Society, also of the Royal 
Historical Society of Great Britain, and a corresponding member 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society and of many others. 

Mr. Bell married, on the 6th of May, 1847, Sarah Almira Gil- 
man, daughter of Nicholas Gilman of Exeter. She died August 
22, 1850, leaving two daughters; Helen, the wife of Professor 
Harold North Fowler, Ph.D., of the Western Reserve University, 
Cleveland, Ohio ; and Persis, the wife of Ilollis Russell Bailey, Esq., 
of the Boston bar. lie married 2d, June 3, 18G7, Mary Elizabeth 
Gilman, daughter of Harrison Gray of Boston and widow of Joseph 
Taylor Gilman of Exeter. She survives him, as do likewise three 
step-children, Daniel, Col. Edward Harrison, and Mary Long Gil- 
man, all residing in Exeter. 



24 The Grasshopper in Bostan. [Jan. 



THE GRASSHOPPER IN BOSTON. 

By Daniel W. Baker, Esq., of Boston, Mass. 

Under the head of book notices in this number of the Register 
some reference is made to a banking institution in London, of an- 
cient origin and known by title, even to this day, as "The Sign of 
the Grasshopper," or more briefly, "The Grasshopper." An allusion 
is there made to another and doubtless more familiar figure of a grass- 
hopper in London, the weather-vane of the Royal Exchange Building. 
These two have a common origin in the armorial crest of the Gresh- 
am family. Our own city of Boston has likewise had two grasshop- 
pers of fame. One yet remains, that in use as a weather-vane on 
the cupola of Faneuil Hall. The other was a vane upon the sum- 
mer house of Peter FaneuiPs garden. His estate fronted on Tre- 
mont street, opposite to the King's Ohapel burial ground, and sloped 
upward nearly to the present Somerset street, much more steeply 
than the existing land surface would indicate. The summer house 
was at the height of the land. It stood, with the vane above its 
roof, till somewhat later than 1830. All who have inquired into the 
matter have agreed that these two vanes were imitations of that on the 
London Exchange. Which of the two was earlier there seems to 
be no means of determining, so that, genealogically speaking, 
whether the London grasshopper is the father or grandfather of that 
we now have is unknown. As to the Faneuil Hall grasshopper 
there is a clear historical record. Peter Faneuil bestowed the hall 
upon the town of Boston in 1712. It was finished in September of 
that year. There is an authentic record that the vane was completed 
May 25, 1712, and the other record being equally authentic, it is 
certain that the vane was put into place during that summer. It is 
made of sheet copper, hollow within and gilded on the outside. Its 
length, including the projecting horns or antennce, is four feet and 
one inch, and its depth, where the rod or staff on which it turns 
passes through, is nine inches. Five years ago there was occasion 
for repairing and regilding it, and at that time was found within it a 
paper, bearing a quaintly written inscription, giving with other facts 
the date of May 25 as above. Peter Faneuil lived several months 
after the completion of the building, so that it is quite certain that 
the grasshopper was made and put up with his cognizance and ap- 
proval, as well as at his cost. 

Mention has not been made, in the various popular accounts of 
the gift of this hall, of a circumstance of peculiar interest. That 
Faneuil's project might take effect there had to be concurrence and 
consent on the part of the town. The first practical step in the af- 
fair had, therefore, to be the drawing up of a town-meeting warrant, 



1895.] The Grasshopper in Boston. 25 

by the selectmen, calling the citizens together. The selectmen did 
so, and dated their document, propitiously, July 4, 1740.* 

What meaning had the grasshopper, as a emblem, to Peter 
Faneuil? Succeeding generations have known the hall as the Cra- 
dle of Liberty. But Faneuil's act antedates American Inde- 
pendence, and his weather-vane can signify nothing of that. Of 
what, then, is it emblematical? The purpose of this article is to 
supply some data for a more specific answer to this question than 
appears now to be available in print. 

The father of Peter Faneuil was Benjamin, who, with two brothers, 
Andrew and John, came to this country soon after the time of the 
flight of the Huguenots from France. It is not known whether 
they came in the same ship. Andrew, at any rate, made his abid- 
ing place for some time in Holland, where, in the city of Amsterdam, 
he was married. It is recorded of others of the Huguenots who 
escaped from France by the way of the Low. Countries, and who 
came hither, that they passed through London, and it is likely that 
Andrew Faneuil did so. The three brothers were in Boston in 
1691, when they were admitted as freemen in the colony. Ben- 
jamin Faneuil soon removed to the Huguenot settlement of New 
Kochelle, N.Y., and there his son Peter was born June 20, 1700. 
The father died in 1718, and a few years later Peter is found in 
Boston in mercantile employment with his uncle, Andrew. 

The latter carried on a large export and import trade with West 
Indian and European ports, and at his decease, in 1737, was the 
richest merchant in Boston. Peter succeeded to the business and 
conducted it, apparently, on same scale, reaping in like manner 
large profits. His coil'ers were further swollen in his being made 
his uncle's residuary legatee. This residue was bequeathed in these 
words : 

"All tho rest of my estate, both leal and personal, whatsoever and 
wheresoever 'tis, In New England, Great Britain, France, Holland or any 
other part of the world." 

A very considerable part of such of this estate as was- in Great 
Britain was "in public funds, such as the bank of England." Dur- 
ring his career of forty-six years as a Boston merchant Andrew 
Faneuil visited London at least once, in 1715. It is not known that 
Peter Faneuil was ever in that city. This commerce, spread out over 
almost half the world, must have pivoted on London as its financial 
centre. That city, then seat of empire as well asmart of exchange 
for all the British Colonies, must have been the subject of daily 
thought and familiar conversation on the part of both the Faneuils. 
To them, doubtless, its commerce eclipsed its- politics, and thus in 
their mental vision it may have been beheld as an aggregation of 
the shipping and merchandise of all seas and all lands,, the recep- 

* The warrant is printed in full in the Rbg-ister, vol. 30, p. 368- 
VOL. XLIX. 3* 















- 

































26 The Grasshopper in Boston. [Jan. 

taclo of the coined money of all realms, with the Royal Exchange 
for its centre, and the golden grasshopper presiding over the ever 
busy s ene. 

The Faneuil estate on Tremont street has been mentioned by 
several writers of local history. More particulars are given by 
Miss Eliza S. M. Qirincy than by any other. She describes the 
mansion as of brick, painted white. In the rear of it was a paved 
Court. Thence above, to the highest level, the hillside was terraced. 
The terraces were supported by massy walls of hewn granite and 
were ascended by flights of stone steps. The summer-house in the 
upper garden commanded a view inferior only to that of Beacon 
Hill. On the summer house glittered a vane, similar to that on 
Faneuil Hall.* The registry shows that the deed by which the land 
was granted to Andrew Faneuil, in 17 10, conveyed also a stone house. 
As he built the spacious brick mansion it is easy to suppose that the 
surplusage of stone on the premises went to make the terrace walls 
and steps. That he built a summer-house and put on it a grasshop- 
per vane, or that the succeeding owner, Peter Faneuil, did so, every- 
body has omitted to state. That the hillside was made by Andrew 
Faneuil to be a sumptuous garden is declared by Mr. L. M. Sargent, 
who wrote extensively on the Faneuil family, having had access to 
various private records and papers. f He says that Andrew Faneuil 
erected there the first hot-house built in New England. He calls 
the estate "Faneuil's seven-acre Eden." Under the circumstances 
there seems to be almost a warrant to infer a summer house. Mr. 
Sargent must have got his "seven-acre" dimension in some familiar 
talk with Faneuil's descendants ; for Mr. Bowditch, the "Gleaner", 
describes in his writings the whole eastern slope of the hill, with the 
characteristic fidelity of a conveyancer, and does not find so much 
as an acre of land for either Andrew or Peter Faneuil. His dimen- 
sions in each case are, 140 feet, front; 120 feet, rear; 321 feet, 
south side ; 328 feet, north side. lie states also that' the south 
boundary line began at a point 76 feet distant from Beacon street. J 
Making a little allowance for a probable widening of Beacon street, 
which in the early deeds was called "the lane leading to the Alms- 
house," this starting point seems to be indicated, at present, as the 
point whore the great dry-goods store now on the corner ceases to 
have a, stone front and takes on a brick front. Granting. that Tre- 
mont street has not been widened here, and being guided by the 
party-line between the owners of the stone part and those of the 
brick part of the dry-goods store, one may say that the Faneuil es- 
tate must have included the Suffolk Savings Bank premises of to-day 
and the store premises next north of it, and must have so extended 
westward that the southwest corner of it projected slightly into what 
is now Somerset street, and the northwest corner into the roadway 

* Memoir of the Life of Eliza S. M. Quincy, part II., p. 88. 
f Dealings with the Dead, p. 495, et seq. 
X Boston ltcc. Coin. Fifth Report, p. 07. 





















' 



























1895.] The Grasshopper in Boston. 27 

running from Pemberton square proper into Somerset street. The 
summer house, if centrally placed, was within the area now occupied 
by the northerly part of the Congregational Building. 

Mr. Sargent uses the word "summer-house," and says that he 
remembers the building and the vane upon it. The word was un- 
doubtedly the family name, the household word, for the structure. 
The more precise statement of a late writer of the best authority is 
that it was a brick tower, three stories high, with a balcony for out- 
look at the topmost story, and he says also that above the roof was 
a grasshopper vane. He adds that the tower was built by Lieut. Gov. 
William Phillips, who owned the place from 1791 to about 1834. 
There is still room for conjecture that Mr. Phillips found the grass- 
hopper upon an antecedent summer-house, of humbler proportions, 
and that wishing to climb higher and behold the whole horizon (ex- 
cepting what the new State House might cut off)-, built the tower and 
restored the grasshopper of that former summer-house. If, as in 
case of the Faneuil Hall insect, "Shein Drowne made itt," slight re- 
pairs beyond regilding would have been necessary. In the position 
indicated the out-look of the tower would have been at a height 
corresponding nearly to the sky line of the new Court House as 
seen from Pemberton square. 

As a figure in the Gresham armorial bearings, the grasshopper is 
not strictly an emblem. It is called a canting crest, that is one 
having an allusion, one suggestive, in a remote or fanciful way. 
Experts in England have disagreed in discussing this particular 
crest. One remarks of the Poyal Exchange grasshopper : 

"This gilded emblem is nothing more than a rebus of the name of the 
founder, Sir Thomas Gresham; in German Grass-helm — in its diminutive — 
means grasshopper." 

This allusion might seem direct enough if the definition were good ; 
but in the diminutive form, which is grasheimchen, it means 
fiehl-cricket, a different insect. Another, having premised that 
"crests of this order have a sort of punning reference to the name," 
makes his interpretation through the Anglo Saxon words, grces and 
hcifft, which, in modern form, are grass and home. Thus, the allu- 
sion is to that which has its home or dwelling-place in the grass ; or, 
conversely, the figure of the dweller suggests the home. 

The Gresham arms, as stated in the connection already referred 
to, were originally granted to Sir Richard Gresham, and were in- 
herited by his son, Sir Thomas. The career of the latter repeated 
in some respects that of his father, but on a much grander scale. 
Sir Thomas was also a Mercer, ana, the golden sign on Lombard 
street being witness, a goldsmith and banker. He did great deeds 
in the Low Countries, both commercial and financial. He was 
distinctly a royal agent there, a service nearly equivalent to that of 
ambassador. He served Henry there, as also had his father, and he 
served also Edward, Mary and Elizabeth. He gained great favor 















- 



. 






' 















28 The Grasshopper* in Boston. [J 



an. 



from three of them, but was somehow ill-treated by Mary. At the 
age of 62 he wrote to Elizabeth, hinting at a recall, and saying "I 
doo waxe olde." He might have said, though it would have been 
unbefitting in that connection, "I do wax rich." Prosperity had 
attended him and vast wealth was in his hands. Soon after his 
return to London, in 1564, he built his spacious mansion in Bishops- 
gate street. Two years later, the city having taken a tract by 
eminent domain for the purpose, he erected at his own cost, and 
gave to the city, the original London Exchange, a building of 
great dignity and renown. It must have been with the sanction, 
and perhaps at the prompting of the city authorities — and the act 
had virtually the sanction of the Queen — but upon the central tower, 
and at each of the four corners of the building, was swung, as a 
weather-vane, the gilded figure of a grasshopper. On the day of 
the formal opening Queen Elizabeth and suite dined with Sir Tho- 
mas at Bishopsgate street, thereafter going to the new building, 
entering it in state, and causing it to be proclaimed by herald and 
trumpet, the Royal Exchange, " and so to be called from thence- 
forth, and not otherwise." That building was destroyed in the 
great London fire, but another was placed on its site of greater 
magnitude and height, and at this day a grasshopper vane of gilded 
copper, eleven feet in length, is displayed at the top of its lofty 
tower. 

Sir Thomas Gresham's chief title to fame has been defined by a 
competent London writer, Walter Bcsant, who says : 

"When Queen Elizabeth ascended the throne the commerical centre of the 
world was Antwerp: when she died it was London. This transfer had 
been effected by the wisdom and foresight of one man, taking advantage 
of the times and their changes — Sir Thomas Gresham. The religious wars 
of the Netherlands brought immense losses to Antwerp. Gresham desired 
to make these losses London's gains. He built the Royal Exchange. The 
possession of the Exchange was followed immediately by sueh a develop- 
ment of enterprise as had been unknown before in the history of the city. 
Next he peisuaded the citizens to take up the Queen's loans themselves, 
so that the interest should remain in the country. Before the reign of 
Elizabeth it was next to impossible for the city to raise a loan of £10,- 
000. Before she died the city was advancing to the Queen loans of £60,- 
000." 

Besides what has already been hinted as to a probable explanation 
of Eaneuirs fondness for the grasshopper it may be assumed that he 
knew something of Sir Thomas Gresham and of the beginnings of 
London's great commerical prosperity, and it may even be that he 
had Gresham's example in mind when he erected and gave to his 
townsmen a great public building in the busy centre of traffic. In 
any view, it seems safe to say that the golden grasshopper, poised 
aloft in the metropolis of New England, symbolized to him what 
its foregoer in the metropolis of Old England did and does* the com- 
mercial enterprise and opulence of its citizens. 



1895.] Deeds of the Mather Family. 29 



SOME DEEDS OF THE MATHER FAMILY OF WEST 
LEIGH, LANCASHIRE, 1609 to 1G32. 

By J. Paul Rylands, Esq., F.S.A., of Birkenhead, England. 

By the kindness of Mr. J. P. Earwaker, M.A., F.S.A., I have 
had an opportunity of examining a bundle of fifteen old documents 
relating to the Mathers of West Leigh, which belong to Mr. W. 
Ecroyd, of Lomeshaye, Nelson, Lancashire ; and I have made the 
following abstracts of them. The seals appended to the deeds are 
of very little interest, being (with the exception of that to the 
bond of 3 February, 1617, which displays the arms of the Lan- 
cashire family of Byrom of Byrom Hall, differenced by a crescent) 
merely fanciful figures of birds and quadrupeds. 

The signatures of Geoffrey Mather, Symond Mather, and Geoffrey 
Mather junior, are in the style of handwriting used by fairly educa- 
ted persons in the seventeenth century; those of Sorocolds, 
Alexander Radclift'e and William Crompton suggest a higher stand- 
ard of education. The tracings of the Mather signatures, which I 
send,* may be of service hereafter for purposes of identification 
when more is known of the early history of the family. 

Symond Mather, of West Leigh, yeoman, Avhose will is printed 
in t\m REGISTER under date 1588, was the father of Geoffrey 
Mather the elder and Robert Mather of Ncwstead, co. Notts., who 
are named in the deeds. Robert returned to West Leigh and died 
in 1617 ; his will is also printed in the Register. 

Geoffrey Mather, the elder, married at Leigh Church, 12 Decem- 
ber, 1591, Anne Parr, and their children, Symond (who was buried 
at Leigh 28 September, 1617), Geoffrey, Ellen, Robert, John and 
James, are all named in the deeds, they were baptized at Leigh 
Church, and the records of these baptisms will be found in "The 
Registers of the Parish of Leigh, Lancashire, 1558-1625, edited 
by J. II. Stanning, M.A., Vicar, 1882," together with the mar- 
riages of Margaret Partington, Jane Liptrott, and Ann Monne or 
Man, the sisters of Geoffrey Mather the elder. The marriage" of 
another sister to James Ilaughton of Arbury in Winwick parish is 
not recorded in the Leigh registers. 

The property owned by Geoffrey Mather passed at last to the 
Sorocold family. One of the Sorocolds is mentioned in Roger 
Lowe's Diary: — "March 1672-3. 7 friday night died Capt. [John] 
Sorrowcold an old cannibell that hath orcthrowne many families but 
he hath now arrived at his one [own] place, abundance of gold and 
silver is found under his liandes." ("Local Gleanings relating to 

* Tlicy arc preserved by the New-England Historic Genealogical Society. — Editou. - 















- 






30 Deeds of the Mather Family. [Jan. 

Lancashire and Cheshire," Vol. I., pp. 191, 215, Vol. II., p. 31, 
where some notiees of the Sorocolds will be found.) There is an 
interesting remnant of the feudal system in the lease of 7 July, 
1G32. 

I have added some genealogical memoranda of Gilbert Mather 
of the Soak in Hampshire, who was born in Lancashire in 1522, 
which were communicated to " Notes and Queries " ; and an abstract 
of a AVrit dated 1417, from the Eisley Charters, which mentions 
Mathew and Richard Mather of Culcheth in Winwick parish, the 
name being written "le Madour." 

I have not met with any armorial seal of the Mathers bearing the 
arms attributed to them ; but in 1706 Abraham Mather and Richard 
Mather witnessed a deed to which the parties were Kichard Clough 
of Kenyon, in the parish of AVinwick, Chapman, of the one part, 
and Thomas, Viscount Fauconberg of the other part, and Clough 
used an oval seal bearing the letters A. M. above a heater shaped 
shield displaying a chevron between three pairs of compasses, 
which was evidently Abraham Mather's seal. The arms of the 
Carpenters' Company of London, granted 6 Edw. VI., A.D. 1552, 
were Argent, a chevron engrailed between three pairs of com- 
'passes tSable, and it is probable that this coat is intended to be 
represented on Abraham Mather's seal. 

Abstracts of Deeds relating to Geoffrey Mather of West Leigh, co. Lancaster, 

yeoman. 

20 December 41 Eliz. 1598. .Counterpart of a Lease (not executed) by 
GefTrayo Mather and Richard Arrowstnyth, of Westleigh, co Lane, yeomen, 
to Roberto Grenehalghe, of Lawton [Lowton] co. Lane, yeoman, of 12 acres 
of land in West Leigh, called " the furthest eyes, the old medowe, the little 
dam, and the ferdell crofte," 6 closes; and liberty during the term for 
Robert Grenehalgh to drive cattle through " the mean© eyse novve in the 
holdinge ol* Gefleray Strange and Thomas Gorlus leading towards Lawton 
Common," as also through other ground of the said Geoffrey Mather 
"leading towards Westleigh mylne or leigh." Term 10 years from 25 
Dec 1 ' 1508. Consideration £55 fine and 10s. Gd. per annum. There is a 
recital of an Indenture dated 2 Sept. 20 Eliz. whereby James Scaresbrecke 
of Down Holland, co. Lane, gent., and Anne his wife, demised the premises 
to Symond Mather deceased [who died 1588] father of the said Geoffrey 
for GO years if the said Anne Scaresbrecke should so long live. There is 
also a recital of an Indenture dated 10 March 2G Eliz. whereby Symond 
Mather assigned the premises to the said Richard Arrowsmyth, apparently 
as a trustee for Symond. 

28 April 16-00. Bond from Geffrey Mather of West Leigh, yeoman, and 
Robert Mather of Newsteede, co. Nottingham, yeoman, to James Sorow- 
colde of Newton in Makerfield, co Lane., in £80, conditioned for the 
performance of covenants in an Indenture of even date. Witnesses to 
Gell'ivy Mather's signature: Jhon Assheton, 'I nomas Thelwall, Richard 
Grundy, and Roger Jameson. Witnesses to Robert Mather's signature : 
Rich: Vrmstonn, John Thomasson, Ja: Sorocoulde Jun r , 1 die Martii 1G10. 



1895.] Deeds of the Mather Family. 31 

2 April 1615. Demise from James Massye of Hindley, co. Lane, gent, 
to Geoffrey Mather of Weastley, yeoman, for 400 years, at a peppercorn 
rent, of lands called Geoffrey Mather's house in West Leigh, being 9 closes 
called " the furmoste eyes, hough, nevve meadowe, tvvoe marled earthes, 
Ilampsone meadowe, the entrye, the greate dame meadow, and the fardyle 
crofte," 21 acres 3 roods, theretofore demised to James Sorocoulde for 
400 years (2 other closes called Jeppe greasse and crofte by Greenes, 2 J 
acres, theretofore sold to Richard Arrowsmith and his heirs excepted). 
Witnesses: Christofer Stanynoghte, Christofer Strange. 

12 April, 1 615. Deed Poll by which Geoffrey Mather of West Leigh 
assigns to Thomas Parr of P[en]kett, co. Lane, yeoman and Gerrard 

Johnson of . co. Lane, innkeeper, for the maintenance of Anne wife 

of the said Geoffrey and his children Ellen Mather, Robert Mather, John 
Mather, and James. Mather, certain lands which James Massye of Hindley 
had leased to the said Geoffrey, called Geoffrey Mather's house in West 
Leigh with fields called " the furmost eyes, hough, new meadow, the entrye, 
the great dam meadow, and the fardyle croft, 21 acres 3 roods, theretofore 
let to James Sorocould, two parcels called Jeppe grease and Croft by 
Greenes (2-i acres) theretofore sold to Richard Arrowsmyth and his heirs 
excepted. Witnesses: Henry Byrora, Richard Arrowsmith's mark, Roger 
Ranicar's mark, Henry Raynolds. 

30 May 1615. Deed Poll, in latin, by which James Massie of Hindley, 
co. Lane, Esq. for good causes and in performance of the confidence reposed 
in him by Geoffrey Mather of Westleigh, yeoman, grants to Simon Mather, 
son and heir apparent of the said Geoffrey, and his heirs, a messuage in 
West Leigh in the occupation of Geoffrey and all those closes &c thereto- 
fore assured to James Sorocoulde of Pynnington, gent, and Richard Arrowe- 
smith of West Leigh, husbandman. Ralph Southworth and Henry Byrora 
of Westleigh, gents, are appointed the attorneys to deliver seizin to Simon 
Mather. Witnesses: John Pattin(?), William Blackburne, Henry Asheton, 
Ja: Sorocoulde, Ja: Sorocoulde Jun 1 *, Robert Whittell. This is a copy at- 
tested by Ja: Sorocoulde and Ja: Sorocoulde Jun r . 

10 January 1615[-1 6.]. Demise, byway of mortgage, by Geoffrey Mather 
of West Leigh, yeoman, and Symon Mather of West Leigh, yeoman, son 
and heir of the said Geoffrey, to James Sorocould of Brockhurst in Pynning- 
ton [in the parish of Leigh] co: Lane, yeoman, of the old meadow, the 
damm, the little damm meadow, the lower barn heys, the two widdows field 
and the foure acre, in all 18 acres of land in West Leigh, for 400 years; 
consideration £357. Witnesses: Rich. Vrmstonn, Rich. Man, Robt. 
AVatmoughe, Henry Moese, Thomas Boydell, Ja: Sorocoulde Jun r , George 
Sorocoulde, John Sorocoulde, Gouth r Kirfote. 

10 January 1815-1 6. Demise, by way of mortgage, by Geoffrey Mather of 
West Leigh yeoman, and Symon Mather of West Leigh yeoman his son 
and heir apparent to James Sorocoulde of Brockhurst in Pynington, co. 
Lane, yeoman, of 2 closes in West Leigh called "the Ilealey Eyes and 
the lytic cowe hey" 6 acres, for 3 years, to secure £30, to be repaid at the 
rate of £10 a year. A provision consol'dates with this a demise by way of 
mortgage of even date. Witnesses: Rich: Urmstonn, Robert Watmoughe, 
Henry Moese, Thomas Boydell, Ja: Sorocoulde Jun r , Rich Man. 

3 February 1617[-18]. Bond from Geoffrey Mather of West Leigh, 
yeoman, son of Geoffrey Mather, of West Leigh, yeoman, to James Soro- 
coulde, of Brockhurst in Pennington, yeoman, in £70, for the performance 
by Geoffrey Mather the father of covenants in an Indenture dated 10 Jan. 



32 Deeds of the Mather Family, [Jan. 

1 Gl 5 [—16]. Witnesses: Robert Watmoughe, Gowther Kirfoote, Thomas 

Curies, Ja: Sorocoulde, Jun r . 

1 May 1618. Demise, by way of mortgage, by Geoffrey Mather the 
elder, of Weasley, yeoman, and Geoffrey Mather the younger, his son and 
heir apparent, to James Soroconlde, of Brockhurst in Pynington, yeoman, 
of Higher Barne Hey in West Leigh, 3 acres, for 400 years; consideration 
£50: 5: C. Witnesses: Richard Vrmstonn, Nycholas Lythgo, George Soro- 
coulde. 

1 May 1618. Bond from Geoffrey Mather the elder and Geoffrey 
Mather the younger, to James Sorocoulde, in £80, for the performance of 
covenants in an Indenture of even date. Witnesses: Rich: Vrmstonn, 
Nycholas Lythgo, George Soroconlde. 

20 March 1620[21]. Defeazance of lands in West Leigh, between 
James Sorocolde, of Brockhurst in Pynnington, gent., Rauffe Sorocolde, of 
Newton in Makerfield, co. Lane, gent., and Robert Watmough, of Lawton 
[Lowton] co. Lane, yeoman, of the one part, and Geoffrey Mather, of 
Westleigh, gent., and Geoffrey Mather his son and heir apparent of the 
other part. Reciting an Indenture of bargain and sale of even date to 
Ralph Sorocoulde and Robert Watmough and their heirs [as trustees] by 
the appointment of James Sorocoulde, of "the oulde medowe, the dam, the 
litle dam medowe, the twoe barne heyes, the twoe widowes fields, the foure 
acre, a parcel of land lying upon the north side of the great cowe hey, and 
one parcel in the west end of the Henley Eyes (one little parcel of land 
and one usual way leading from the dwelling of the said Geoffrey to Strange 
Common excepted). And reciting that the lands were formerly granted to 
James Sorocold his executors &c by lease for a great number of years, it 
was agreed that if the said Geoffrey Mather or his heirs should pay to 
James Sorocoulde either £24: I : 6 for each acre, or a certain specified sum 
for each field (amounting in the whole to £466: 3: 2) that as such pay- 
ments were made such parts of the premises should be reconveyed by James 
Soroconlde, Rauffe Sorocoulde and Robert Watmough to Geoffrey Mather 
&c. Witnesses •• Alexander Radclyffe, Rich: Vrmstonn, Richard Grundy, 
W" Crompton. 

20 March 1620[-21]. The Counterpart, witnessed by Henry Byrora, 
Alexander Radclyffe, Wm. Crompton. 

15 June 1621. Deed of feoffment, between Geoffrey Mather; of West- 
leigh, gent., and Geoffrey Mather his son and heir apparent of the one part, 
and Richard Urmeston, of Pynington, gent., and William Crompton, of 
Bedford [in the parish of Leigh] co. Lane, yeoman, of the other part, of 
lands in West Leigh, to the use of Geoffrey Mather the elder for life, and 
after his death as to one half to the use of Anne his wife for her life, and 
as to the other half and the reversion of the former half to the use of Geof- 
frey Mather the son, his heirs and assigns. Power of Geoffrey the father 
to grant by deed or will an annuity of 40 shillings, charged on the lands, 
for any future wife or wives of his (one Alice Swan of Pynnington only 
excepted) for her or their life or lives. Witnesses: linger Ranicker's 
mark, Richard Grundy, Christopher Strang, Richard Man's mark. Mem- 
orandum endorsed that on 16 June 1621 possession was given to Richard 
Urmeston and William Crompton in the presence of the same witnesses. 

4 March 1 624-5. Deed of feoffment, between Geoffrey Mather, of West 
Leigh, yeoman, Geoffrey Mather, of West Leigh, yeoman, his son and heir 
apparent, and Ann Mather, wife of Geoffrey the father, of the one part, 
and George Sorocold, of Brockhurst, yeoman, of the other part, of lands in 






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1895.] \ Deeds of the Mather Family. 33 

West Leigh; consideration £112. Alexander Radclyffe and William 
Crompton appointed attorneys to deliver seizin. Witnesses to the signa- 
tures of Geoffrey Mather the father and Geoffrey Mather the son : Alex: 
Radcliffe, Thomas Corles son of James, Robert Tickle, William Tickle, 
Ja: Sorocolde. Witnesses to the signature (mark) of Anne Mather : Henry 
Byrom, Alex : Radcliffe, Roberte Watmoughe, Ja : Sorocolde, Win : Cromp- 
ton, Jo: Sorocolde, Thomas fforbor. Memorandum endorsed that on 30 
April 16*25 seizin of the lands was given by Alexander Radcliffe and Wil- 
liam Crompton to George Sorocold in the presence of Henry Byrom, Ja: 
Sorocolde, Robert Watmoughe, Geffrey Mather [the elder] Thomas ffor- 
bor, Jo: Sorocolde. Memorandum endorsed that on 7 July 1632, seizin of 
a close of land, parcel of the within mentioned lands was delivered by 
Alexander Radcliffe and William Crompton to George Sorocold in the 
presence of: Richard Grundy, Robert Watmoughe, Geffrey Mather [the 
elder] Christopher Strange Junior's mark, Jeffrey Mather [the younger]. 

7 July 1632. Counterpart of a Lease, by George Sorocolde, of Ashtoh 
in Makerfield, co. Lane, yeoman, to Geoffrey Mather, of West Leigh, yeo- 
man, for the lives of Geoffrey Mather the elder, Geoffrey Mather the 
younger, and James Mather another son of Geoffrey the elder, of a mes- 
suage in West Leigh, and the little cow hey, the higher barn hey, land 
situate at the east end of the Henley eyes, land at south east corner of the 
great cow hey, 2 closes called Pingotts, the rood land situate in a meadow 
called Hart's meadow; in all 15 acres 1 rood large measure; rent 22s. 
10£d. per annum. There is a covenant by Geoffrey Mather during the 
term that he his executors or assigns will " beare carry and showe one 
muskett peece w th the furniture thereunto belonging when & as often as 
the s d George Sorocoulde his heirs or assigns shall be comanded to showe 
a muskett with the furniture thereof as aforesaid for such landes as the said 
Geffrey Mather the father & Geffrey Mather the Sonne have sould unto 
James SoiocOuld the late father of the said George and unto him the said 
George, hee the said George Sorocold his heirs & assignes upon his and 
their costs & chardges fynding & provyding from tyine to tyme the said 
muskett peece & furniture aforesaid during the said terme." Witnesses : 
Henry Byrom, Richard Grundy, Alex : Radcliffe, Roberte Watmoughe, 
Wm. Crompton, Jeffrey Mather Jun r . 

Extracts from the Parish Registers of Leigh, in the County of Lancaster. 

The Rev. J. II. Stanning, M.A., Vicar of Leigh, has kindly sent for 
publication the following extracts relating to the Mather family, in contin- 
uation of the Mather entries in his " Registers of the Parish of Leigh, Lan- 
cashire, from February 1558 to March 1625," printed iu 1882. 

Marriages. 
1627 May 15. John Mather & Ellen Cowdall. 
1627-8 February 11. John Mather & Katherine Partington. 
1632 November 10. Jeffrey Mather & Ellen Arrosmyth. f 
1637 August 1. James Mather & Elizabeth Strange. 
1638-9 January 27. Symond Mather & Margaret Flightwood. 
1630 July 3. John Mather & Margaret Smith. 
1 630-10* February 8. Richard Grundie & Ellin Mather. 

Jiurials. 

1625 April 7. John Mather de Atherton. 

1626 May 13. John Mather de Bedford. 

VOL. JCLIX. 4 



34 Deeds of the Mather Family. [Jan. 

1626-7 Jan* 12. ux[or] William Liptrott de Westleigh. 
1630 April 10 [20?]. John Mather de Astley. 

" October 10. Jeffrey Mather al[ia]s Collier. 
1031 June 24. James Mather de Pinington. 
1 638 October 1 6 [?] James Mann of Tilesley. 
1639 March 29. Jefferie Mather of Westley. 
1644 July 25. James Mather of Tildsley. 
1665 April 22. Gentkin Mather de Abram. 
1GGG May 12. Abram Mather de Radclife parish. 

" ]\lay 20. A da[ughter] of Henry Mather de Pinington. 
16GG-7 March 20. Margery Mather, widdow de Tildsley. 
1GG8 July 11. Simon Mather de Lowton. 
Sep. 20. John Mather of Westleigh. 
1671-2 March 10. Richard son of Richard Mather of Shakerley. 

Gilbert Mather of Soak, Hampshire. 

The following genealogical memoranda were communicated to Notes Sf 
Queries (8th S.lV. October 14, 1893) by M r W. D. Macray. They occur 
in the calendar prefixed to a Roman Breviary, printed at Lyons in 1556, 
now in the Bodleian Library, and have been inserted by one Gilbert 
Mather. The writer's own name, Gilbert Mather, occurs in several parts 
of the volume, which, in 15G6, was possessed by one Ambrose Barnabye. 

Jan. 13. 1544. I was maryed at Eastoue 

Jan. 20. 1561. Gilbertus Mather films meus natus fait. 

Feb. 9. 1551. Nafea fuit Alicia filia mea apud Chilbolton. 

Feb. 26. 1542. I cam[e] fyrst to Winchester. 

March 19. 1547. Natus fuit Thomas Mather filius meus 

March 26. 1548. Sepultus fuit predictus Thomas. 

April 5. 1539. I cam[e] fyrst to Chippen[ham] 

April 15. 1554. Natus fuit Henricus filius meus. 

April 17. [or 19] 1546. Natus fuit Thomas Mather senior filius mens. 

June 3. 1553. 1 toke possessyone of my howse in the Soke [Hampshire]. 

June 15. 1522. I was borne at Weryngtone in Lancashere 

July 6. 15G8. Natus fuit Gilbertus Mather filius meus 

July 10. 1539. I was bounde prentise in Norwiche. 

Sept. 20. 1553. I cam[e] into my howse in tht, Soke fyrst' to dwell 
after I had bowght the same. 

Sept. 27. 1549. I cam[e] to Chilboltone [Hampshire] to dwell. 

Oct. 3. 1545. I was sworne tenanto at Chilboltone. 

Nov. 12. 1549. Nata fuit Elizabeth filia mea apud Chilboltone. 

Dec. 15. 1546. I cam[e] into the Soke to dwell there, being tenante to 
Richard llarrold. 

From the Rishy (co. Lancaster) Charters. 
16 August, 5 Henry V. (A.D. 1417) Writ to the Sheriff of Lancashire 
commanding him to attach James son of Ric. de Radcliff of Radcliff to answer 
Nicholas de Risley of Risley, wherefore he with Ric. de Radclyf of Radclyf, 
Armiger, Oliver de Entwissel of Bury, Gentilmau, John de Rothwell of 
Radclyf, yoman, John Atkinson of Pilkington, yoman, Thomas Acson of 
Pilkington, yoman, Wm. le Walker of Radclyf, yoman, Mathew le Madour 
of Culcheth, husbandman, Jit'c. le Madour of Culcheth, husbandman, and 
Roger de llertleghes of Culcheth, by force and arms broke the close of the 
said Nicholas at Risley and him took and imprisoned at Radclyf and took 
away four cows and other enormities then did. 












. 
























A 715287 

1895.] The Archives of Harvard University. 35 



THE ARCHIVES OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 

By William Gahkott Buown, of Cambridge, Muss. 

Ont the fifth floor of Gore IIjiII, at the east end, are four iron 
cases that are rarely opened even for those permitted to pass the 
sign " Not open to Visitors " on the doors of the wing of the Library 
commonly known as the "stack." Within these cases are shelves 
heavily laden with bound volumes and bundled papers, most of 
which arc yellow and time worn. The signs of age are not decep- 
tive, for the Archives of Harvard College include some of the old- 
est — and crabbedest — manuscripts to be found anywhere in America. 
The gradual accumulation of two centuries and a half of collegiate 
history, these records must possess a peculiar interest not merely 
for antiquaries but for educated Americans and students of Ameri- 
can history in general. 

Practically all of the Archives proper, which are not to be con- 
founded with the much larger collection of matter, chiefly printed, 
relating to the University and known as the rr H. U. Collection," 
are in manuscript. For this reason, as well as from the more or 
less confidential nature of some of the information they contain, 
access to them cannot be freely given. Indeed, it is in his capacity 
of Archivist, and not as Librarian, that the head of the Library cares 
for them. Nevertheless, it is in accordance with the entire policy 
of the University that those who are legitimately interested in the 
records should know what they are and what information they con- 
tain. Some account of them inay be found in the appendix to the 
first volume of Quincy's History of Harvard University ;' in Sib- 
ley's Harvard Graduates, and his contributions to the Proceedings 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society ; in various papers by Mr. 
Andrew McF. Davis, particularly No. 27 of the Bibliographical 
Contributions of the Harvard Library; and elsewhere. They have 
been intelligently used by these and other students of the early 
history of the College, and Quincy gives copious extracts from the 
more important volumes. But no comprehensive account of them 
has been written, and in fact no shelf list of the collection was ever 
made until 1892, when they were removed' from the ground floor of 
the Library, where they had been left for years in much confusion, 
and arranged in the iron cases which now contain them. 

Here they are roughly classified in three groups, according as 
they relate chiefly to the affairs of the Corporation, the Overseers, 
or the immediate government of the University and its various 
departments. To some of the matter, however, even this rough 



36 The Archives of Harvard University. [Jan. 

classification will not apply. In the earlier books of record, in 
fact, entries may be found side by side relating to each or all of 
these bodies ; and there are some papers, of a more or less personal 
character, not clearly relating to either. 

The " College Books " stand at the head of the Corporation 
papers. They are the manuscript records of the President and 
Fellows from the Charter of 1650 down to the present time, includ- 
ing, in the earlier volumes, various miscellaneous entries concerning 
the other departments of the College system both before and after 
the creation of the Corporation. Quincy believed— and has so 
stated in his History — that College Book No. I. was in reality Nos. 
I. and II. together, and when the volume was re-bound in his day 
it was so denominated on the cover. But an index compiled by 
President Wadsworth contains various references to No. II., none of 
which apply to any volume now in the Archives ; it seems certain, 
therefore, that No. II. has been lost. The pagination of No. I. is 
confused, and its miscellaneous and unsystematic entries show that 
it was used as a memorandum bock of college affairs in general rather 
than as a record of any particular governing body. The entries in 
No. 111., which is in part a transcript of No. I., have also this miscel- 
laneous character. The later volumes, however, except one, which 
is devoted to the Hollis benefactions, are in the main regular records 
of Corporation meetings and votes. The eleven volumes covering 
the period from the beginning down to 1847 are in the Archives; 
the others are still in the Treasurer's office in Boston. Probably 
no other non-political corporate body in America could exhibit 
written records extending over sp many years. For this reason, 
and because of the intrinsic importance of the matter itself, it is 
rather surprising that none of these books has been printed. Of 
Nos. I. and II. careful transcripts have been made by Mr. Davis, 
which are being indexed, and there are rough indices of the later 
volumes also. 

Closely supplementing the College Books are three other bound 
series — the Treasurers' Books, the Stewards' Account Books, and 
the Harvard College Papers. Of the Treasurers' Books, properly 
so-called, there are but two in the Archives, covering the period 
ll)()D-17i;3. Both of these were found among John Hancock's 
effects long after his death, one (the oldest) having lain for years 
in his carriage-house ; it was in so ruinous a state when discovered 
(hat it could not he restored, and much of it is either lost or entirely 
illegible. The Stewards' Books, though much more numerous, do 
not form a perfect series. The first volume begins with 1G50, and 
the material they contain for the new school of economic history 
has been pronounced "priceless" by one who is perhaps the lead- 
ing exponent in Amcriea of that department of Inquiry, 1 am 
inclined to think that Mr. Weeden, for example, might have 
enriched his volumes on the economic history of New Fngland by 



1895.] TJie Archives of Harvard University. 37 

data obtained from this source ; and any American who undertakes 
a work similar to Thorold .Rogers's study of the history of prices in 
England should find here valuable information and material. 

The Harvard College Papers, bound in two series, the first of 
eleven volumes, folio, the second of thirty volumes, quarto, occupy 
only a little less than one-fourth of all the space in the iron eases, 
and cover the whole period of the College's history. Until two 
years ago quite a number of papers which belong to this series were 
loose and disarranged. Out of these, four supplementary volumes 
have been made, and the loose papers still remaining have been 
arranged in bundles, each bundle being placed beside the bound 
volume which it supplements — a plan that has been adopted with 
unbound documents in the other departments of the Archives also. 
No general description will apply to the "H. C. Papers." Most 
of them relate to the financial affairs of the corporation ; but many, 
especially in the earlier volumes, are of much wider interest. Of 
those bearing dates earlier than 1805 a calendar with notes, ex- 
planatory and historical, has been made and carefully indexed, so 
that the information they contain can be readily reached. A col- 
lector of autographs would find the series of interest as exhibiting 
the handwritings of various colonial worthies from the Mathers to 
Washington and Hancock. 

Three other series — the Letters to the Treasurer (1829-1868), 
in fourteen volumes, the College Letter Books, being the letter 
books of the various Presidents from 1846 to 1868, in six volumes, 
and the Letters to the President (1846-1867), unbound, in twelve 
large bundles — are placed among the Corporation papers, though 
many, perhaps most, of the letters in the second and third series 
relate to the immediate government. There are also several shelves 
full of miscellaneous volumes and papers relating to corporation 
affairs. The most notable of these, perhaps, are the Donation 
Books, in two volumes, the three volumes of Ilollis letters and 
papers, and those pertaining to other early benefactors. Here are 
books made up of papers concerning the Charlestown Ferry, the 
receipts from which were among the first sources of revenue to the 
infant college ; concerning the foundation of early professorships ; 
concerning the lands and other properties of the Corporation in 
colonial times. In fact, here is all the necessary material, taken 
together with the several series of records I have mentioned, for the 
most voluminous history of the President and Fellows of Harvard 
College. Perhaps the abundance of this material is the circum- 
stance that has led Quincy and Peiice in their books to dwell at so 
great length on the business side of the University's career. 

The matter relating to the Overseers is much less voluminous, 

though the development of the system of reports to that body has 

caused a rapid increase in recent years. As I have mentioned, the 

earliest records of the Overseers are to be found in the first and third of 

vol', xl ix. 4* 










































. 









88 The Archives of Harvard University. [Jan. 

the College Books. The separate series known as the Records of 
the Overseers begins with the year 1707, and the eleven volumes in 
the Archives cover the period 1707-1882. The Reports begin in 
1761, and the bound volumes number thirty-seven. j\lany of the 
later reports are printed, and they cover a wide range of educa- 
tional topics. The printed Presidents' and Treasurers' Reports 
make a separate series for which at present there is not room enough 
in the iron cases. 

The records and papers of the immediate government of the 
University would probably possess, in the eyes of the public, more 
importance than those of either the Overseers or the Corporation. 
Unfortunately, we have no Faculty Records, properly so-called, 
for the period before 1725, though certain acts of the President 
and Tutors are given in the earlier College Books. There are, 
moreover, three old volumes — Tutor Henry Flynt's Diary (1707- 
1747), President Leverett's Book (1707-1723), and President 
Wadsworth's Book (1724-1736) — which serve as a sort of intro- 
duction to the Records themselves. Of these there are two series. 
One, made up of original books of entry, covers the period 1772- 
1874, and is in thirty-four volumes of various sizes. The other, of 
which sixteen volumes have been placed in the Archives, covers the 
period 1725-l8b'5, most of the volumes, perhaps all, being trans- 
cripts. The Reports of Faculty doings in the colonial period are 
lews lull than might be desired; but much valuable and curious 
information is contained in the books as they stand. 

Three other series belong to the papers of the immediate govern- 
ment ; the Parietal Records (1828-1887), in twelve volumes; the 
Exhibition and Commencement Parts (1828-94), of which there 
are forty-three volumes and enough papers still unbound to make 
eight or ten more; and the Bowdoin Prize Dissertations (1808- 
18!> 4), of which there are twenty-one volumes and matter enough 
still unbound to make half a dozen more. Nothing in the Archives 
except the earliest College Books surpasses in general interest these 
prize papers. The number of dissertations by men who afterwards 
attained eminence is remarkable. To the first volume John G. 
Palfrey and Jared Sparks were contributors. Later papers are by 
George Bancroft, Emerson, Benjamin R. Curtis the jurist, Charles 
Sumner, -George TieknOr Curtis, E. R. Hoar, Richard Henry Dana, 
Edward E. Hale, James 0. Carter, Phillips Brooks, and others 
scarcely less well known in later life. The character of the subjects 
discussed by these men in their etudent days, and the convictions 
then expressed, are sometimes in consonance, sometimes in striking 
contrast with the trend of their various careers in manhood. In 
one paper, by a youth who became renowned as an orator, 1 find 
a passage which, a score of years afterwards, was introduced bodily 
into a famous oration. One essayist, who became an important 
historical writer, discusses with ardor the career of a devotee of 









. 









1895.] Family of William Cornwall. 39 

natural science ; another historian of still greater celebrity devotes 
himself to a demonstration of the necessity of a revealed religion 
with such an earnestness as might well have heen taken to indicate 
for him a life of preaching; while a third, whom the whole country 
was destined to acknowledge as a preacher of foremost rank, if not as 
the first of all American divines, studies with interest and intelligent 
sympathy the methods of an ancient historian. The Commence- 
ment and Exhibition Parts are briefer, and as a rule less serious 
productions ; but they, too, might have furnished material for certain 
biographies, and may well be investigated by biographers who are 
yet to write. 

Altogether, the Archives are worth studying by workers in more 
than one field. To New England genealogists and antiquaries 
they have already proved invaluable. It is much to be desired that 
some of the more important books and papers should be printed, 
or that at least some index or calendar of their contents should be 
given to the public. 



FAMILY OF WILLIAM CORNWALL. 

Contributed by Edward E. Cornwall, M.D., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

William Cornwall came to Massachusetts about 1634. He and his 

first wife, Joan , were members, in 1635, of Rev. John Eliot's 

church at Roxbury. In 1636 he went with the "Great Removal" to 
Connecticut, and in 1637 was one of the thirty-seven soldiers from Hartford 
in the expedition against the Pequod Indians. In 1G38 lie was at Say- 
brook. In 1639 he was back in Hartford and had a house lot of eight 
acres there, " No. 54, west of South St., south from the Lane " (near the 
north end of the present Village St.). In the earliest record of his land at 
Hartford, dated February, 1639, he is spoken of as "William Corn well. 
Sergeant at Arms." He lived in Hartford till 1651 ; was a member of the 
church there, and probably all his children by his second wife, Mary 

■ , were born there; but he did not reside all of that period in the 

village, for a document dated 1648 speaks of him as " at present resident in 
Ilocanum, in the bounds of Hartford." In 1 (15 L he removed with the first 
settlers to Middletown. His house lot there was " neare ye landing place 
by ye springe" (present corner of Main and Washington Streets). His 
lands at Middletown on both sides of the Connecticut River were first re- 
corded February 30, 1657, — total amount 903 acres. He was repre- 
sentative from Middletown in 1654, '57, '64 and '05. In 1664 he was 
constable at Middletown. In 1066 he received a grant of land in East 
Hartford for his services in the Pequod war — (knowledge of this fact has 
been traditionary in the family). His town privileges, right of common, 



40 Family of William Cornwall. [Jan. 

etc., in Hartford, lie held by the "courtise of the town." In 16G7 the 
General .Court at Hartford " freed William Cornwell's head from the pay- 
ing of rates." July 10, 1GG8, he joined the recently organized church at 
Middletown. In 1 670 he was assessed at Middletown on £100, which was 
one of the largest assessments on the list of fifty-two householders. April 
2, 1G74, he made his will, in which he speaks of himself as "being well 
stricken in years (though, through mercy, in as perfect use of my under- 
standing as ordinarily men are of my years), expecting my change to be 

very near " He divides his property among his eight children, 

John, William, Samuel, Jacob, Thomas, Sarah, Hester Willcox and Eliza- 
beth Hall, and makes careful provision for his "loving wife, Mary Corn- 
wall," both during her widowhood and in the possible event of her marrying 
again and being in need. He requests his "loving brothers and friends 
Deac. Stocking and to Deac. Hall" to oversee and execute the will, to 
which he signs his name. He died at Middletown, February 21, 1G78. 
Estate £281. 

From what part of England William Cornwall came is not known. 
There are some reasons for supposing it to be Hertfordshire. There are 
also reasons, by no means conclusive, for thinking him a brother of Thomas 
Cornwall who came to Massachusetts about the same time, was with him in 
Hartford in 1639, and afterwards went to Long Island and Rhode Island. 

The name in early documents is variously written Cornwell, Cornwall, 
Cornell, Cornel, Cornil, Cornol, Corniel and Cornwayle. 

1. Sergeant William 1 Cornwall, married 1st, Joan ; married 

2d, 1639, Mary ; lived in Roxbury, Hartford and Middle- 
town. 

Sgt. John, 2 b. April 1640; cl. Nov. 2, 1707. 
William', b. June 2-1, 1041; d. June 15, 1691. 
Samuel, b. Sept. 1C42; d. Dec. G, 1728. 
Jacob, b. Sept. 1646; d. April 18, 1708. 
Sarah, b. Oct. 1647: in. Oct. 16, 1675, Daniel Hubbard. 
Thomas, b. Sept. 1648; d. 1702. 

Ester, b. 1G50; cl. May 2, 1733; m. 1st, 1671 (as 4th wife), John 
Willcox, Jr.; in. 2d, 1678, John Stow. « 

Aiil. E.LiZAUKTii, b. 1651 ; in. Capt. John Hall of Middletown. 

2. Sgt. John 3 Cornwall (Sgt. William 1 ), married June 8, 1GG5, Martha, 

daughter of Deacon Paul Peck of Hartford. Lived in Middletown. 
Left a will. Estate £317. 

Mary, 3 b. Nov. 20, 1666. 

Martha, b. Aug. 30, 1669; m. 1692, Richard Hubbard. 

John, b. Aug. 13, 1671. 

William, b. Aug. 17, 1673. 

Paul, b. June 6, 1G75. 

Hannah, b. Sept. 5, 1677. 

Capt. Joseph, b. Oct. 5, 1679; d. Feb. 3, 1742. 

Thankful, b. March 1, 1682. 

Thankful, b. July 26, 1685; d. June 1, 1758; m. Jona. Sleed. 

Benjamin, b. Dec. 23, 1688; d. May 20, 1754. 

William 2 Cornwall (Sgt. William 1 ), married November 30, 1670, 
Mary 2 Bull ( William 1 ). She died November 25, 1717. Lived in 
Middletown. Left a nuncupative will. Estate £415. 

12. i. William,? b. Sept. 13, 1671; d. July 16, 1747. 
ii. Jacoh, b. July 9, 1673. 



2. 


i. 


3. 


n. 


A. 


iii. 


5. 


iv. 




v. 


6. 


VI. 




vn 





i. 




ii. 


7. 


iii. 


8. 


iv. 


9. 


v. 




vi. 


10. 


vii. 




viil 




i\. 


11. 


X. 


3. 


WlL 





i. 




ii. 


13. 


iii. 




iv. 




v. 


14. 


vi. 


15. 


vii 



1895.] Family of William Cornwall. 41 

iii. Experience, b. April 14, 1682; m. Arthur Bevin. 

iv. Abigail, bapt. Feb. 9, 1689; cl. young. 

v. Ebenezer, b. 1G89; prob. cl. young. 

vi. ELIEZUR, b. Feb. 1G92; postll. d. young. 

4. Samuel 3 Cornwall (Sgt. William 1 ), married January 15, 1GG7, 

Rebecca 3 Bull ( William 1 ). Lived in Middletown. Left a will. 

Estate £G00. 

Mary, 3 b. Oct. 28, 1GG7; d. Sept. 28, 1GG9. 

ReRecca, b. Dec. 2G, 1G70. 

William, b. Jan. 22, 1G70; d. Dec. 25, 1704. 

Elizabeth, bapt. Dec. 4, 1G75. 

Mary, bapt. Dee. G, 1G77. 

Samuel, bapt. July 1G, 1G79; d. 1730. 

Ebenezer, d. 1751. Mentioned in his father's will. 

5. Jacob 2 Cornwall (SgL William 1 ), married June 18, 1G78, Mary 8 

White (Capt. Nathaniel, 2 Elder John 1 ). Lived in Middletown, and 
inherited his father's house. Estate £406. 

i. Mary, 3 b. Nov. 2, 1G79; m. May 30, 1718, Francis Whitmore. 

ii. Jacob, b. Aug. 9, 1681; d. Aug. 9, 1681. 

1G. iii. Jacob, b. Oct. 1, 1G82. 

iv. Nathaniel, b. Aug. 30, 1G84. 

v. Giles, b. Aug. 14, 1686. 

vi. Daniel, b. Dec. 22, 1G88. 

vii. Isaac, b. Sept. 18, 1G90 ; m. July 29, 1714, Mary Burliss of Hartford. 

17. viii. Capt. Wait, b. July 21, 1G92. 

ix. Elizabeth, b. July 21, 1G97; m. 1st, June 8, 1714, Jacob Dowd; m. 
2d, March 24, 1724, Ebenezer Wetmore. 

18. x. Timothy, b. Aug. 23, 1700; d. 1732. 

6. Thomas 2 Cornwall (Sgt. William 1 ), married, 1672, Sarah Clarke. 

Lived in Middletown. Estate £185. 

i. Thomas, 3 b. Dec. 27, 1G73. 

ii. Hannah, b. Feb. 27, 1G7G. 

iii. Daniel, b. Aug. 8, 1G77. 

iv. Jonathan, b. Dec. 19, 1G79; d. 1705? 

v. Abraham, b. Sept. 4, 1682; went in Canada Expedition, 1707. 

vi. Steven, b. July G, 1685; d. 1722, leaving two young children. 

vii. David, b. Sept. 1687; d. Jan. 20, 1725. 

vill. Ann, in. Aug. 9, 1721, John Pertleld. 

ix. Sarah, in. 1720, Samuel Bowdon, 

x. Silence, m. Nov. 20, 1721, Moses Bowden. 

7. John Cornwall (S(jt. Johii? Sgt. William 1 ), married 1st, September 

15, 1G05, Elizabeth' Hinsdale. She died May 23, 1699. He mar- 
ried 2d, Mary Hilton. Lived in Middletown. 

i. Elizabeth, 4 b. Aug. 21, 1G9G. 

ii. Mary, b. Aug. 25, 1700; m. (?) Sept. 24, 1718, David Dowd. 

iii. Miriam, b. Sept. 27, 1702. 

iv. John, b. April 7, 1705 ; m. Dec. 27, 1727, Mary Foster. Had Abijah,* 
I). Dec. 21, 1735; Thomas, b. April 13, 17-10; Samuel, b. Sept. 14, 
1742; Hannah, b. March 10, 1745; John, b. April 23, 174G; Sarah; 
Mary, and four who d. young. 

v. Eunice, b. Nov. 30, 1709; m. Nov. 10, 1726, Daniel Robertson. 

vi. Desike, b. March 16, 1711. 

vii. Hannah, b. Nov. 13, 1715. 

8. William 3 Cornwall (Sgt. John, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married December, 

169:9, Martha Thompson of Wethersiield. Lived in Middletown 
and, perhaps, elsewhere. 
























• 



i 






42 Family of William Cornwall. [Jan. 

I. Martha, 4 b. Aug. 13, 1705. 

ii. Ann, b. Jan. 26, 1708. 

iii. Mary, b. June, 1712. 

iv. Sybil, b. Nov. 11, 1716; d. Aug. 20, 1727. 

9. Paul 8 Cornwall (Sgl. John, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married September 4, 
1701, Susannah Bowdeii of New Haven. Lived in Middletown and 
New Haven. 

i. Hannah, 4 b. Aug. 23, 1702. 

ii. John, b. Oct. 5, 1701: d. 1706. 

iii. Sarah, b. May 5, 1707; m. Oct. 18, 1726, Theophrastus Jones. 

iv. John, b. Jan. 26, 1709. 

v. Susannah, b. July 20,1712: d. young. 

vi. Susannah, b. Jan. 20, 1714; m. Isaac Matthews. 

vii. Paul, b. Nov. 15, 1715. 

viii. Benjamin, b. Dec. 26, 1717. 

10. Capt. Joseph 8 Cornwall (Sgt. John, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married 1st, 
April 20, 1710, Abigail Harris. She died May 13, 1723. He mar- 
ried 2d, April 7, 1726, widow Elizabeth Lewis Hall. Lived in 
Middletown. 

i. Joseph, 4 b. April 7, 1711; m. 1st, Abigail Cande and had Joseph,* 
b. Oct. 7, 1738, who m. 1760, Phebe Stow and had Joseph,* b. Jan. 
8, 1761, who removed to New York State. 

ii. Abigail, b. Oct. 13, 1712. 

iii. Daniel, b. April 11, 1714. 

iv. Elizabeth, b. March 7, 1716. 

v. Lieut. Nathaniel, b. Oct. 6, 1718: d. 1775; m. Mary Cornwall. 

11 .Benjamin 3 Cornwall (Sgt. John, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married 1st, May 
12, 1712, Hannah Merry. She died December 14, 1732. He mar- 
ried 2d, Mary Ward. She died February 19, 1740, aged 43. He 
married 3d, Hannah Willcox. Lived in Middletown. Estate 
£0,000. 

i. Benjamin, 4 b. April, 1713; d. Nor. 24, 1724. 

ii. Asiibell, b. May 6, 1715; cl. Feb. 6, 1729. 

iii. Rachel, b. Sept. 27, 1717. 

iv. Elijah, b. 1720. 

v. Cornelius, b. July 15, 1722 : m. Dec. 18, 1745, Abigail Cornwall. 

Ii). vi. Hknjamin, b. Fob. 16, 1736; d Aug. 1807. 

vii. Hannah, b. Feb. 16, 1736. 

viii. Mine-well, b. Aug. 11, 1738. 

12. William 8 Cornwall ( William, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married 1691, Ester 3 

Ward (John, 3 Andrew 1 ). She died July 13, 1734, aged 65. He 
removed to East Middletown (back of Wangunk Meadow) about 
1703. 

20. i. William, 4 b. Oct. 20, 1692 : d. 1755. 
ii. Mary, b. Nov. 21, 1694. 
iii. Ebenezek, bapt. 1697. 

iv. Axdukw, b. June 2, 1700; m. 1st, 1725, Elizabeth Ravage, and had 
Andrew,* b. 1735, who in. 1756, Lydia Abbe and had Andrew, 6 b. 
1759. 
v. John, b. April 9, 1703. 
vi. Samuel, b. May 31, 1706. 
vii. ESTER, b. Oct. 10, 1708. 
viii. Jacob, b. Jan. 23, 1712. 

13. William 8 Cornwall (Samuel, 1 Sgt. William 1 ), married Hester 

. Lived in Middletown. Estate .£100. 



1895.] J Family of William Cornwall. 43 

i. Jemima, 4 bapt. Feb. 4, 1700. 

ii. Lois, bapt. Feb. 8, 1701 ; in. March 15, 1725, Daniel Collins. 

14. Samuel 3 Cornwall (Samuel, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married April 13, 

1711, Phebe 4 Hall (Samuel, 3 Richard 2 John 1 ). Lived in Middle- 
town. 

i. Samuel, 4 b. Feb. 27, 1714. 

ii. Phebe, b. Oct. 5, 1717. 

iii. George, b. Oct. 1719. 

iv. Elisha, bapt. Oct. 18, 1721; m. Feb. 28, 1745, Ann Johnson. 

v. Mary, b. Sept. 1721. 

vi. Ester, b. Aug. 28, 1726. 

vii. Ebenezer, b. Oct. 20, 1729. 

15. Ebenezer 3 Cornwall (Samuel, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married April 26, 

1715, Abigail Clark of New Haven. Lived in Middletown. 

i. Ester, 4 b. Feb. 20, 1716; d. young. 

ii. Ehenezer, b. Dec. 27, 1718; d. Feb. 3, 1727. 

1G. Jacob 3 Cornwall (Jacob, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married March 20, 1711, 
Edith Whitmore. Lived in Middletown. 

i. Jacob, 4 b. Aug. 25, 1712; d. at sea Oct. 20, 1726. 

ii. Daniel, b. June 24, 1711 ; in. 1744, Carry s of Durham. 

iii. Margaret, b. April 12, 1716; d. young. 

iv. Edith, b. Oct. 1717. 

v. Hannah, b. July 5, 1719. 

vi. Isaac, b. Sept. 1722; killed by lightning, 1734. 

vii. Ruth, b. Feb. 1, 1725. 

viii. Mary, b. Sept. 18, 1726. 

ix. Nathaniel, b. .July 12, 1729; killed by lightning, 1731. 

x. Francis, b. Nov. 1731. 

xl. Jam ms, b. Aug. 18, 1735. 

17. Capt. Wait 8 Cornwall (Jacob 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married April 24, 

1717, Mary Todd. Lived in Middletown. 

i. Millie, 4 b. July 9, 1717. 

ii. Mary, b. July 17, 1719. 

iii. Mercy, b. July 17, 1719. 

iv. Timothy, b. Jan. 21, 1722; m. Dec. 3, 1747, Martha "Brown. Had 
Nov. Wait,* b. 1750, who grad. Yale Col. 1782, and d. in Ohio 1S16. 

v. Abigail, l>. July 2, 1725. 

vi. Susan, b. May 3, 1729. 

vii. Mabel, b. Nov. 29, 1730. 

viii. Sarah, b. Aug. 23, 1733. 

18. Timothy 3 Cornwall (Jacob, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married 1st, 1726, 

Rebecca 2 Welles (Capt. James 1 ); married 2d, March 20, 1728, 
Susannah Hamlin. Lived in Middletown. 

i. Timothy, 4 b. Oct. 30, 1727; d. young. 
ii. Kerecca, b. March 18, 1730. 
iii. Timothy, b. Dec. 25, 1731. 

19. Benjamin 4 Cornwall (Benjamin. 2 Sgt. John, 2 Sgt. William 1 ) married 

1758, Hannah Williams. Lived in Middletown and Farmington. 

i. Benjamtn,* b. Nov. 12, 1759; d. 1835; m. Ester Carrington. 

ii. Caleh, b. July 30, 1762; d. 1809; in. Hannah Johnson, 

iii. Olive, b. Feb. 28, 1764; d. 1849; m. Josiah Barnes, 

iv. Mindwell, b. April 22, 1768; d. 18-18; m. Daniel Olvord. 

v. Nancy, b. April"12, 1772; d. 1843; m. Isaac Richards. 


















. 
















































44 Family of William Cornwall. [Jan. 

vi. Titus, b. Sept. 29, 1774; d. 1813; m. Jlebecca Porter. 

21. vii. Calvin, b. Aug. 2(5, 1778; d. Sept. 3, 18G2. 

20. William 4 Cornwall (William, 8 William, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), married 

April 2, 1725, Ester, daughter of Lieut. Nathaniel 8 Savage (John 1 ) 
and Ester' 2 Ranny (Thomas 1 ). Lived in East Middletown. 

i. John,* b. Dec. 18, 1725. Removed to Granville, Mass. 

22. ii. William, b. May 4, 1727; d. May, 1750. 
iii. Estkr, b. Aug G, 172!). 

iv. Bazkkl, b. April 2, 1730. 

v. Nathaniel, b. April 2, 1730; d. 1750. Served in first French war. 

vi. Samuel, bapt. Feb. 4, 1733. 

21. Calvin* Cornwall (Benjamin* Benjamin* Sgt. John, 2 Sgt. William 1 )* 

married Anna Beckwith. Lived in Burlington, Conn. 

i. Almiron, 6 b. April 10, 1812; m. Martha Lewis. Lives in Joliet, 
III. Had Horace,' 1 b. July 6, 1840, cl. young; Anna, b. Oct. 20, 
1848; Isabella, b. Dec 23, 1853. 

ii. Horace, b. May 9, 1818; ra. Jan. 1, 1847, Lucy Ann Deming. She 
d. July 12, 1883. Lives in Hartford. Lawyer. Representative 
in Connecticut Legislature. U. S. District Attorney. Had Hor- 
ace D., 1 b. Nov. 25, 1847, d. March, 1848 ; William D. and Kate D., 
b. Sept. 5, 1850; Horace D., b. June 23, 1858, cl. June 9, 18G7. 

22. William* Cornwall (William, 4 William, 8 William, 2 Sgt. William 1 ), 

married June 27, 1749, Sarah* Shepherd (John, 4 Edward, 8 Sgt. 
John? Edward 1 }. Lived in East Middletown. 

23. i. Nathaniel, 6 b. April 2, 1750; d. 1823. 

23. Nathaniel 6 Cornwall (William, 6 William, 4 William, 3 William 2 Sgt. 

williapi 1 ),,marrled 1st, November 5, 1772, Jerusha, daughter of Asa 5 
Foote (Nathaniel 4 Nathaniel, 3 Nathaniel, 9 Nathaniel 1 ) and Jerusha 4 
CiwUiv (Ezra* Thomas,' 2 Bev. Thomas 1 ); married 2d, 1798, Anna 
Domini;. Lived in Chatham, now Portland, Conn. Established 
just before the Revolutionary wai* a mill for dying and dressing 
cloth and carding wool. Justice of the Peace. Parish clerk thirty- 
four years. 

i. Asa, 7 b. Sept. 17, 1773; d. June 3, 1775. 

ii. .Ikkushv, b. July 1, 177G; in. 1st, Wm. Lord; m. 2d, Cheevcrs 

Urainerd. 

iii. Anna, b. March 13, 1778. 

iv. Sarah, b. Feb. 13, 1780; m. Ebenezer Hale of Glastonbury. 

24. v. ReV. Asa, b. April 3, 1782; d. 1832. 
vi. Ezra, b. Oct. 20, 1787. 

25. vii. Major David, b. June 15, 1790; d. 1874. 
viii. Amelia, b. Dec. 24, 1799. 

ix. George, b. April 10, 1800; cl. 1824, leaving an infant daughter. 
x. Sophia- b. March 24, 1801. 

24. Rev. Asa 7 Cornwall (Nathaniel, 4 William, 6 William, 4 William 8 

William* Sgt. William 1 ), married December I, 1805, Anna, daugh- 
ter of Solmon 4 Ellsworth (John* John* Josiah 1 ) and Mary Mosely. 
Her grandmother, Anna (Edwards) Ellsworth, was daughter of 
Rev. Timothy Edwards. Episcopal clergyman in Granby and 
Cheshire, Conn. Vice principal of Cheshire Academy. 

i. Anna Edwards, 8 b. Nov. 4, 180G; d. Nov. 2, 1808. 
ii. Anna Edwakds, b. Oct. 10, 1810; in. Solomon E. Alden. Had 
Elsie Ann, 9 b. JD.ec. 21, 1850. 



1805.] Family of Willi dm Cornwall. 45 

26. iii. Kev. Nathaniel Ellsworth, b. Feb. 6, 1812; d. 1881. 

iv. JERUSHA EOOTE, I). Oct. 13, 1813; d. May 15, 1892. 

v. Frederick William, b. May 19, 1810; d. young. 

vi. Mary Mosely, b. March 8, 1818. 

vii. Frederick William, b. Sept. 22, 1822; d. 1804; m. 1844, Elizabeth 
Prescott. Gnul. Trinity Coll., Hartford, 1842. Had Charles F.,* 
b. Nov. 1, 1848, who m. 1878, Elizabeth Kearny, and had Elizabeth 
Foute, 10 b. 1879. 

25. Major David 7 Cornwall (Nathaniel? William? William, 4 William? 
William? Sgt. William 1 ), married January 3, 1815, Maria O., daugh- 
ter of Capt. Oliver 2 Attwood ( Capt. Elijah 1 ) and Dorothy 6 Chapman 
(Col. Jahez? Jabez? Capt. John? Capt. Robert 1 ). Lived in Port- 
land, Conn. UN Hill owner and farmer. Major in militia. Probate 
judge. Parish clerk forty-three years. 

27. i. Dr. Nathaniel Oliver, 8 b. May 31, 1816. 

ii. Maria Attwood, b. Feb. 7, 1818. 

iii. Julia Ann, b. May 9, 1819; m. David S. Stocking, 

iv. Elizabeth Foote, b. Feb. 1, 1821. 

v. William Ezra, b. April 11, 1824; m. Caroline Porter of Boston, 

and had Caroline, William E. and Frank. 

vi. Richard Loud, b. June 24, 1828. 

20. Rev. Nathan i kl Ellsworth 8 Cornwall, D.D. (lieu. Asa? 
Nathaniel? William? William? William? William? Sgt. William 1 ), 
married November 12, 1834, Susan P., daughter of Daniel 8 Bedinger 
(Henry? Adam 1 ) and Sarah, daughter of Col. Robert 2 Rutherford 
(Hugh 1 ) and Mary, widow of Lord Howe, who was killed at Ticon- 
deroga 1758. Graduate Trinity College, Hartford, 1831. Graduate 
General Theological Seminary, New York city, 1834. Episcopal 
clergyman in Fairfield, Conn., nineteen years, and in New York 
City. Published articles on religious and musical subjects. D.D. 
from Trinity College. 

i. Anna Bkdingkr, 9 b. Dec. 28, 1C35. 

ii. Sarah Jkru&ha, b. Oct. 2, 1837. Published volume of poems. 

iii. Edwin Kuthisrford, b. Aug. 15, 1839; m. Elizabeth Corlear. 

Dentist in Liverpool, England, 
iv. Rev. Nathaniel Ellsworth, Jr., b. Aug. 5, 1842; m. 1882, widow 

Kli/.ii (Meeker) ('adv. Grad, Columbia College, 18G2. Episcopal 

clergyman In (Mevehind, Ohio. 
v. Prof. Hknky Hk.dinhkk, 1). July 20, 1814; ra. July 3, 1875, Mary 

Hall Porter. Gnul. Columbia Coll., 1864. Grad. Royal School of 

Mines, Freiburg, Germany, 1809. Prof, of chemistry at Princeton 

College, N. J. ^since 1873. Had JTenru Ellsworth, 10 b. 1876, d. 

young; Marian, b. 1880; Donald liiu'./u-rford, b. 1882, d. young; 

Ellsworth Bedinger, b. Oct. 21, 1881. 

27. Dr. Nathaniel Oliver 8 Cornwall (Major David? Nathaniel? 
William? William? William? William? Sgt. William 1 ), married 18 GO, 
Mary A., daughter of Hrackett M, 7 West (Rev. Joel? Capt. Samuel? 
Nathan? Samuel? Samuel? Francis 1 ) and Mary A. 8 Stocking (Syl- 
vester? Eben? Steven? Steven? George? Deacon Samuel? George 1 ). 
Graduate Trinity College, Ilartfard, 1839. Graduate College of 
Phys. and Surg., New York City, 1846. Dentist twenty-two years 
in Brazil and Buenos Aires. 

i. Julia A., 9 b. 1861; d. young, 
ii. Kloisk M., b. June 9, 1862. 

iii. Dr. Edward E., b. July 2, 1866. Grad. Wes. Univ., Middletown, 
Ct., 1887. Gi'ad. Coll. Phys. and Surg., New York City, 1890. 
'■ Physician in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

VOL. XLIX. 5 * 












. 






- 


















. 












/ 



46 Old York County Records. [Jan. 



OLD YORK COUNTY (ME.) RECORDS. 

Copied by Geo. A. Gordon, A.M., of Somcrvillc, Mass. 

Pro vy nee of Mayne 
By Vertue of An Act made by his Excellency y e Governo 1 " and Councill 
Marriages recorded in y e s d Provynce 

By Samuell Wheel wrigh Esq r one of his Maj ti8 Gustices of the 
Peace were married 
Gilbert Endicott and Hannah Gouge were married Aprill 28th 1686 
Richard Blanchett and Elizabeth Hussey were married 12th July 1686 
Samuel Littlefield and Mary Coale were married 4th December 1686 

By Mr Jn° Emerson minist 1- 

Jno Leigaton of Kittery were married to Hono e Langly of Portsm e 13th 
June 1686 

John Nason of Barwick were married to Bridgett Weymouth of the same 
Towne October 7 th 1687 

William Sanders and Sarah Wittum w^re married in December 1687 

By M e Burroughs minist 1- 
Michaell Webber and Deborah Bedford married August 14 th 1686 
Jeremiah Jordan and Deborah Bickford married March 10 th 1686-7 
John Osborn and Lidia Rogers married Nov* 11 1687 
Daniel Libhy Sc Mary Ashton married 23 ifeb 1 ' 1687 

By Sylvanus Davis Esq Justice of the peace married 
Benjamin Leatherby of North Yarmouth and Deborah Ingersall of 

ffalmouth married y 1 ' l sL December 1686 

Moses Downing and Sarah Samson of Scarborough were married 

December y e 23 1686 

By John Wincoll Esq Justice of y° Peace 
James Goodiii married to Sarah Tomson y° 9" 1 of December 1686 
Zachary Emery married to Elizabeth Goodin 9 th December 1686 
John flbsse married to Sarah Goffe y e 25th January 1686 

By M r Benjamin Woodbridge minister were married as followeth 
Richard Arther to Mary West both of Portsm married July 16 1688 
John Thurston and Hannah Carey both of Kittery were married 15 
August 1688 

Nathaniel Keene and Sarah Greene both of Kittery married 2 d Novem- 
ber 1688 

Benjamin Berry and Elizabeth Withero both of Kittery married 27 th 
November 1688 

Samuel Willis Esq r of Hartford & Mrs Mary Love of Barwick married 
28 th December 1688 

By M r Martin Minister 

Anthony Cowes and Darkes Wooden were married the 5° September 
1688 



. 









. 



• 









1895.] 



British Officers serving in America, 



47 



BRITISH OFFICERS SERVING IN AMERICA, 1754-1774. 

Contributed by Wokthington Chauncey Ford, Esq., of Washington, D. C. 
[Continued from Vol. 48, page 436.] 

Duto of Commission. 

17 January, 1757. 
5 August, 1762. 
30 December, 1755. 

8 July, 1760. 
27 December, 1770. 
12 January, 1757. 

1 February, 1757. 
14 February, 1760. 

22 April, 1762. 

9 October, 1767. 

16 November, 1772. 

2 December, 1760. 

1 June, 1759. 

18 May, 1761. 
25 March, 1762. 
14 January, 1757. 

20 September, 1758. 
14 January, 1757. 

17 October, 1759. 
14 January, 1757. 

2 February, 1757. 

19 January, 1757. 
17 October, 1759. 
27 January, 1757. 

13 January, 1757. 

23 July, 1757. 

14 November, 1763. 

14 November, 1763. 

21 January, 1757. 
30 May, 1759. 
29 April, 1760. 

24 February, 1761. 

29 January, 1756. 

24 July, 1762. 

25 December, 1770. 
4 January, 1757. 

15 September, 1758. 
18 May, 1757. 
27 December, 1755. 
3 December, 1756. 



Name. 


mink. 


.Regiment 


McDonald, Alexander 


Lieut. 


77 




Capt. Lt. 


77 


McDonald, Allan 


Captain 


59 


McDonald, Angus 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


McDonald, Donald 


Captain 


78 


McDonald, Donald 


Lieut. 


77 


McDonald, Donald 


Ensign 


60 


McDonald, Donald 


Ensign 


95 


McDonald, Donald 


Ensign 


60 


McDonald, Donald 


Lieut. 


26 


McDonald, Humphrey 


Ensign 


77 


McDonald, James 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


McDonald, James 


Captain 


42 


McDonald, John 


Ensign 


77 




Lieut. 


77 


McDonald, Ronald 


Lieut. 


78 




Captain 


78 


McDonald, William 


Captain 


77 


McDonell, Alexander 


Lieut. 


78 


McDonell, Charles 


Lieut. 


78 




Capt. Lt. 


78 


McDonell, Hector 


Lieut. 


78 


McDonell, John 


Captain 


78 


McDonell, John 


Lieut. 


78 




Ensign* 


15 




Q r . M r . 


15 


McDonell, William 


Lieut. 


78 


McDougal, George 


Lieut. 


60 


McDougal, John 


Lieut. 


60 


McDougal, John 


Ensign 


60 


McDuifio, James 


Ensign 


42 


Mcintosh, Alexander 


Lieut. 


42 




Captain 


42 




Captain 


42 


Mcintosh, Alexander 


Capt. Lt. 


77 




Captain 


77 


Mcintosh, Alexander 


Ensign 


60 


Mcintosh, George 


Ensign 


62 




Lieut. 


60 



* With rank as lieutenant. 





















. 






















































. 
















. 




























































































































































48 



British Officers serving in America. 



[Jan. 



Mcintosh, James 

Mdlntosh, John 

Mcintosh, Lachlan 

Mcintosh, William 
Mcintosh, William 
Mcintosh, William 
McKay, Francis 

McKay, Samuel 

McKemptie, David 

McKenzie, Alexander 
McKenzie, Alexander 
McKenzie, Alexander 
McKenzie, Chas. Barrington 



McK 



cjvcnzic, 



David 



McKenzie, Hugh 
McKenzie, James 
McKenzie, John 
McKenzie, Roderick 
McKenzie, Roderick 
McKenzie William 
M'Kinen, Robert 
M'Kinnon, James 
M'Kinnon, John 
M'Kinnon, John 
McKinnon, Robert 



McKinnon, Ronald 



MeLaughlan, John 
McLean, Alexander 

McLean, Allan 
McLean, Sir Allan, Bt. 
McLean, Allen 
McLean, Charles 
McLean, Donald 
McLean, Francis 
McLean, John 
McLean, Neil 



McLean, Neil 
McLean, William 
McLean, William 



Ensign 


42 


Lieut, 


42 


Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


42 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 


Lieut. 


So. Ca. 


Ensign 


42 


Ensign 


43 


Lieut. 


27 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


60 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


58 


Adj't 


58 


Lieut. 


77 


Captain 


77 


Ensign 


77 


Ensign 


9 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Captain 


77 


Surgeon 


62 


Ensign 


77 


Captain 


77 


Lieut. 


77 


Lieut. 


77 


Lieut. 


1 


Ensign 


1 


Lieut. 


77 


Ensign 


47 


Capt. Lt. 


35 


Captain 


35 


Ensign 


77 


Lieut. 


77 


Ensign 


77 


Lieut. 


42 


Adj't 


42 


Lieut. 


62 


Captain 


77 


Captain 


N. Y. 


Ensign 


43 


Surgeon 


77 


Captain 


42 


Surgeon 


78 


Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


42 


1 st Lieut. 


21 


Ensign 


47 


Lieut. 


47 


Ensign 


77 


Lieut. 


77 


Ensign 


42 



15 December, 1756. 
25 July, 1758. 

4 December, 1759. 

15 May, 1762. 

25 December, 1756. 
11 January, 1761. 
19 July, 1758. 
3 May, 1760. 

25 December, 1765. 
31 December, 1755. 
7 December, 1756. 
30 December, 1755. 

6 December, 1756. 
11 February, 1756. 

11 February, 1756. 

7 January, 1757. 
14 January, 1757. 
22 April, 1757. 
30 October, 1762. 
29 April, 1760. 

26 April, 1762. 

6 January, 1757. 

2 February, 1756. 

19 September, 1758. 

17 January, 1757. 

5 February, 1757. 

3 February, 1757. 
25 December, 1756. 

20 September, 1760. 

16 September, 1758. 
24 February, 1762. 

14 April, 1759. 

27 July, 1760. 

16 January, 1757. 

21 September, 1758. 
21 July, 1757. 

16 July, 1758. 

7 October, 1758. 

8 January, 1756. 
16 July, 1757. 

16 January, 1759, 

15 February, 1762. 

16 April, 1762. 
15 July, 1758. 

12 January, 1757. 
15 September, 1758. 
11 February, 1762. 
19 January, 1771. 

1 August, 1759. 

2 August, 1762. 
10 January, 1757. 

18 September, 1758. 




































■ 


































. 










































' 










































1895.] [British Officers serving in America. 



49 



McLellan, Alexander 
McLeod, Alexander 

McLeod, Allan 
McLeod, Donald 
McLeod, Norman 

McLeod, Norman 
McLeroth, Robert 
McLure, William 

McManns, James 
McMartin, Cosmo 
McMine, William 
McMullin, Allan 
McMyne, William 
McNab, Archibald 

McNabb, John 
McNeil, John 
McNeill, Donald 

McNeill, Rory 
McNeir, Alexander 
McPherson, Colin 
McPherson, Hugh 
McPherson, James 
McPherson, John 
McPherson, John 
McPherson, Luchlan 

McPherson, Malcolm 
McPherson, Phineas 
McPherson, Robert 
McPherson, Robert 
McPherson, William 
McQueen, James 
McQueen, Somerville 
McVicar, Archibald 
McVicar, Duncan 

Meadows, Thomas 
Meara, Jeremiah 

Melliquette, John 
Menzies, Alexander 
Menzies, Charles 

Menzies, Robert 
Menzies, Robert 

Menzies, Thomas 
Mercer, Daniel 

VOL. XLIX. 



• 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Ensign 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Surgeon 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Q r . M r . 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Chaplain 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Q r . M r . 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 



34 

78 
78 
44 
47 
80 
80 
78 
64 
60 
60 

1 
77 
58 
48 
58 
42 
42 
77 
42 
78 
78 
78 
95 
42 
42 
77 
78 
78 
78 
78 
7h 
42 
78 
60 
16 
78 
48 
77 
55 
55 
60 
29 
29 
29 
77 
42 
42 
42 
78 
78 
N. Y. 

8 



28 August, 1763. 
11 January, 1757. 
4 September, 1759. 

4 May, 1760. 

27 December, 1757. 

4 October, 1760. 
24 July, 1760. 

I January, 1766. 

II May, 1757. 
16 June, 1760. 

29 December, 1756. 
26 January, 1757. 

30 April, 1760. 

7 November, 1755. 

29 July, 1758. 
13 June, 1761. 
29 January, 1757. 

16 December, 1752. 
20 July, 1757. 

17 October, 1759. 
20 January, 1757. 

28 June, 1762. 
13 October, 1761. 
26 January, 1756. 

31 July, 1757. 

5 January, 1757. 

5 October, 1760. 
22 April, 1759. 
9 July, 1760. 

4 September, 1759. 
1 June, 1759. 

12 January, 1757. 

22 April, 1760. 
4 March, 1769. 

29 April, 1760. 

6 June, 1757. 

7 January, 1758. 

13 June, 1759. 

15 December, 1759. 

16 January, 1765. 

1 January, 1760. 

2 August, 1769. 

13 February, 1762. 

18 September, 1758. 

28 July, 1758. 

8 October, 1761. 
2 August, 1757. 

15 September, 1758. 

23 August, 1760. 

2 December, 1759. 

29 November, 1771. 














































































































' 




























• 













































' 



■ 



50 



British Officers serving in America. 



[Jan, 



Mercer, John 
Mercer, Monsieur 
Mercier, Peter 
Mercier, Thomas 
Meredith, Hugh 
Meredith, John 
Meredith, Thomas 

Meriweather, Richard 
Mestral, Lewis de 

Metham, G. Montgomery 
Meyer, Elias 

Milbank, Alcomb 
Miller, Francis 
Miller, Henry 
Miller, James 
Miller, Richard 
Millett, Mathew 
Millett, Thomas 
Milligen, George 

Mills, Andrew- 
Mills, David 
Mills, John 
Mills, Thomas 
Mills, Thomas 
Milne, Alexander 
Milward, Edward 
Milward, Robert 
Milward, Solomon 
Minchin, Paul 
Minnett, James 

Mirrie, Robert 
Mime, Robert 
Mitchell, John 

Mitchell, Thomas 

Mitchel, William 

Mitchelson, James 
Molesworth, Pons 
Molesworth, Robert 
Molesworth, St. George 

Mompesson, John 
Moncrief. George 
MoncriefF, Patrick 



Captain 47 

Ensign 43 

Lieut. So. Ca. 

Lieut. 47 

Lieut. 80 

Lieut. 52 

Ensign 62 

Lieut. 60 

Ensign 45 

Lieut. 60 

Lieut. 60 

Ensign 10 

Lieut. 62 

Capt. Lt. 60 

Captain 28 

Ensign 45 

Ensign 65 

Chaplain 59 

Lieut. N. Y. 

Ensign 64 

Ensign 22 



Surgeon 


So. Ca. 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 


Lieut. 


29 


Lieut. 


42 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


Ensign 


15 


Lieut. 


47 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 


Ensign 


17 


Major 


-59 


Captain 


69 


Lieut. 


29 


Lieut. 


55 


Capt. Lt. 


55 


Captain 


1 


Major 


77 


Lieut. 


45 


Capt. Lt. 


45 


Lieut. 


15 


Q r . M'. 


15 


Apoth y Mate Br. 


Surgeon 


60 


Captain 


28 


Captain 


29 


Lieut. 


43 


Ensign 


52 


Lieut. 


52 


Lieut. 


8 


Lt. Col. 


26 


Ensign 


16 


Ensign 


26 


Lieut. 


26 



10 December, 1756. 
25 February, 1757. 

25 April, 1747. 

I July, 1755. 

16 July, 1758. 

13 February, 1762. 

6 January, 1756. 

13 December, 1756. 
27 September, 1762. 
31 March, 1760. 

13 September, 1766. 

17 July, 1771. 

23 January, 1756. 
27 April, 1762. 

8 March, 1757. 

14 December, 1762. 

16 April, 1771. 

15 January, 1756. 

17 December, 1751. 
13 April, 1768. 

11 March, 1759. 

22 January, 1755. 

26 November, 1760. 

7 December, 1764. 

19 July, 1757. 

25 February, 1748-9. 

26 April, 1759. 

II May, 1760. 
3 July, 1758. 
25 April, 1766. 
21 March, 1765. 

9 March, 1763. 

3 May, 1765. 

31 December, 1755. 
31 January, 1761. 

25 June, 1747. 

23 March, 1761. 

1 June, 1750. 

7 April, 1761. 

26 September, 1757. 
31 October, 1762. 

1755. 

20 April, 1759. 
9 April, 1756. 
23 April, 1766. 

2 February, 1757. 

4 March, 1760. 

25 February, 1767. 
9 December, 1767. 

18 December, 1755. 

8 April, 1767. 

21 February, 1769. 
2 March, 1770. 












- 

■ 











































■ 





























■ 












1805.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



51 



Moncriir'e, Thomas 
Moncrieife, Thomas 

Money, Thomas 
Money peiiny, Joseph 

Money penny, Alexander 

Monin, 

Monins, John 

Monington, Richard 
Monkton, Hon. Robert 



Monro, Alexander 
Monro, George 
Monro, George 

Monro, Plarry 

Monro, Henry 
Monro, Henry 
Monro, James 

Monroe, John 
Monsell, William 

Montgomery, Alexander 
Montgomery, Alexander 
Montgomery, Alexander 
Montgomery, Archibald 
Montgomery, George 
Montgomery, Hugh 
Montgomery, Hugh 
Montgomery, James 
Montgomery, John 

Montgomery, Richard 



Montresor, James (or John) 
Monypenny, Alexander 
Moore, Charles 

Moore, Henry 
Moore, John Henry 
Moore, James 
Moore, Patrick 
Moore, Hon. Robert 
Moore, William 



Lieut. 


1 


Captain 


55 


Captain 


59 


Ensign 


G9 


En sign 


15 


Lieut. 


15 


Major 


22 


Ensign 


GO 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


GO 


Surgeon 


G9 


Col. Com 4 


GO 


Colonel 


17 


Maj. Gen. 




Ensign 


77 


Captain 


77 


Ensign 


77 


Lieut. 


77 


Ensign 


78 


Lieut. 


78 


Chaplain 


77 


Lieut. 


77 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


60 


Ensign 


22 


Lieut. 


29 


Captain 


29 


Captain 


43 


Q r . M r . 


77 


Ensign 


1 


Lt. Col. 


.77 


Ensign 


15 


Lieut. 


77 


Captain 


78 


Chaplain 


10 


Ensign 


29 


Ensign 


10 


Ensign 


17 


Lieut. 


17 


Adj*. _ 


17 


Captain 


17 


Lieut. 


48 


Captain 


54 


Captain Lt. 


59 


Captain 


59 


Lieut. 


48 


Ensign 


16 


Chaplain 


17 


Ensign 


69 


Captain 


59 


Adj't 


27 


Ensign 


27 


Lieut. 


27 



28 December, 175G. 

14 February, 1760. 
2 March, 1768. 

8 December, 1767. 

6 October, 1757. 

29 April, 17G0. 

17 September, 17G0. 
2G July, 1758. 
29 April, 17G0. 
25 August, 1762. 

19 October, 1763. 

20 December, 1757. 

24 October, 1759. 

20 February, 1761. 

21 September, 1758. 

15 January, 1757. 

20 January, 1757. 
2 June, 1762. 

23 July, 1757. 

12 December, 1759. 

12 January, 1757. 

7 February, 1757. 
2 January, 1756. 

9 December, 1756. 

25 February, 1761. 

13 February, 1762. 
13 September, 1769. 

21 September, 1756, 
12 January, 1757. 
11 May, 1759. 

4 January, 1757. 

29 July/1758. 

21 July, 1757. 

2 June, 1762. 

30 July, 1762. 

26 May, 17G2. 

22 April, 17G7. 

21 September, 1756. 

10 July, 1758. 

15 May, 1760. 
4 May, 1762. 
4 July, 1755. 

22 February, 1757. 
28 January, 1763. 
28 May, 1770. 

1 1 February, 1756. 
4 February, 1769. 

16 February, 1756. 
28 February, 1766. 

3 May, 1759. 

21 September, 1756. 
25 December, 1757. 
7 March, 1762. 











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52 



British Officers serving in America, 



[J an, 



Moore, William 

Moore, 

Morgan, John 
Morgan-. 



Morris, Apollos 
Morfis, Arthur 
Morris, Charles 
Morris, John 

Morris, Roger 
Morris, Roger 
Morrice, Sla Long* 
Morris, Thomas 



Morris, Withrington 

Morris, 

Mostyn, Roger 
Motte, Isaac 

Mountain, George 
Moyle, T. Coppinger 
Muir, Grainger 
Mukins, Francis 



Muller, Jacob 
Muller, John K. 
Munro, George 
Minister, D. 
Minister, Herbert 
M unlock, Robert 
Murison, James 

Murray, Alexander 
Murray, Alexander 

Murray, Alexander 
Murray, Henry 

Murray, Hon. James 



Murray, James 
Murray, James 
Murray, James 
Murray, Lord John 

Murray, John 
Murray, John 
Murray, Patrick 
Murray, Patrick 



Surgeon 


1G 


Lieut. 


77 


Chaplain 


34 


l Mt Lieut. 


94 


Captain 


27 


Lieut. Col. 


17 


Ensign 


17 


Lieut. 


47 


Major 


35 


Lieut. Col. 


47 


Captain 


N. Y 


Lieut. 


17 


Capt. Lt. 


17 


Captain 


17 


Captain 


55 




Br. 


Ensign 


05 


Ensign 


GO 


Lieut. 


GO 


Lieut. 


47 


Ensign 


28 


1 st Lieut. 


94 


Lieut. 


15 


Adf m 


15 


Captain 


15 


Lieut. 


G8 


Ensign 


GO 


Lieut. 


GO 


Captain 


G2 


Major 


GO 


Surgeon 


48 


Lieut. 


59 


Adj'. 


59 


Major 


45 


Lt. Col. 


55 


Lt. Col. 


■18 


Captain 


14 


Ensign 


15 


Lieut. 


15 


Lieut. Col. 


15 


Col. Com 1 


60 


Maj. Gen. 




Captain Lt. 


55 


Captain 


42 


Lieut. 


78 


Colonel 


42 


Lt. Gen'l 




Lieut. 


78 


Lieut. 


42 


Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


GO 



23 April, 1757. 
1G August, 17G2. 

March, 1757. 
21 July, 17G0. 
3 September, 1761. 
21 September, 1756. 
16 September, 1762. 
10 December, 175G. 
16 February, 1758. 
19 May, 1760. 
7 November, 1751. 

10 December, 1755. 

29 July, 1759. 
21 August, 1761. 

25 December, 1755. 

1755. 

30 June, 1768. 

19 December, 1756. 
15 April, 1759. 

9 December, 1756. 
21 March, 1766. 

7 March, 1760. 
30 March, 1756. 
29 August, 1756. 
2 May, 1762. 

19 February, 1756. 

11 October, 1766. 

26 July, 1761. 

29 December, 1755. 

20 July, 1758. 

28 August, 1753. 

10 October, 1758. 
6 February, 1764. 

1 October, 1755. 
25 February, 1760. 
20 March, 1761, 

2 August, 17 GO. 

29 April, 1760. 
2 May, 17 62. 

5 January, 1750-1. 

24 October, 1759. 
10 July, 1762. 

29 August, 1756. 

20 July, 1757. 

15 September, 1758. 

25 April, 1745. 

21 January, 1758. 

6 February, 1757. 
18 July, 1758. 

9 March, 1761. 

26 December, 1770. 



* Staats Long Morris, brother to Gouverneur Morris. 



























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1895.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



53 



Murray, Thomas 


Colonel 


46 


23 June, 1743. 




Lt. Gen. 




19 January, 1758. 


Murray, Thomas 


Ensign 


10 


23 October, 1771. 


Murray, William 


Captain 


42 


18 July, 1758. 


Musgrave, Thomas 


Captain 


64 


20 August, 1759. 


Myddleton, Thomas 


1 st Lieut. 


40 


27 June, 1755. 


Nairne, Henry 


Capt. Lt. 


64 


2 March, 1768. 




Captain 


64 


12 July, 1770. 


Nairne, John 


Lieut. 


78 


16 July, 1757. 




Captain 


78 


24 April, 1761. 


Napier, James 


DirectorHosp. Br. 


1755. 


Napier, John 


Captain 


95 


18 February, 1760. 


Napier, William 


Ensign 


14 


1 December, 1763, 




Lieut. 


14 


16 September, 1771, 


Nartloo, Francis 


Ensign 


55 


2 May, 1760. 


Nash, Thomas 


Lieut. 


22 


16 November, 1763. 


Neale, William 


Adj;t 


22 


21 April, 1758. 




Ensign 


22 


20 November, 1758. 




Lieut. 


22 


18 April, 1761. 


Needham, Georgo 


Capt. 


46 


29 November, 1749. 


Need ham, George 


Ensign 


27 


15 December, 1762, 


Needham, William 


Lieut. 


45 


26 June, 1755. 


Needham, William 


Q;. w. 


22 


17 September, 1760. 


Neilson, Andrew ^_ 


Lieut. 


52 


3 April, 1759. 




Capt. Lt. 


52 


27 April, 1768. 


Neilson, Richard 


Lieut. 


22 


22 March, 1763, 


Nerdberg[orNordberg] Joh 


n Lieut. 


60 


28 July, 1758. 




Lieut. 


60 


29 March, 1766. 


Nesbitt, Alexander 


Lieut. 


31 


22 April, 1757. 


1 


Capt. Lt. 


31 


24 November, 1769. 




Captain 


31 


12 July, 1770. 


Ness, John 


Lieut. 


14 


* 17 May, 1762. 




Lieut. 


14 


26 December, 1770. 


Netterville, John 


Ensign 


62 


25 January, 1756. 




Lieut. 


60 


23 August, 1758, 


Netterville, Nicholas 


Lieut. 


27 


21 September, 1756. 


Nevin, Hugh 


Lieut. 


45 


19 March, 1758. 


Newburgh, Robert 


Chaplain 


18 


18 November, 1772. 


Newland, Edmund 


Ensign 


80 


28 June, 1758. 


1 


Lieut. 


80 


8 September, 1761. 


Newland, Trevor 


Lieut. 


1 


30 December, 1756. 


Newton, Hibbert 


l 8t Lieut. 


40 


15 October, 1754. 


Newton, Phillips 


1 st Lieut. 


40 


29 July, 1751. 


Newton, Phillips 


Capt. Lt. 


48 


8 April, 1762. 


Nicholson, Arthur 


Surgeon 


60 


25 December, 1756. 


Nicholson, Henry 


Lieut. 


15 


11 January, 1758. 


Nicholson, Richard 


Ensign 


47 


10 December, 1758. 




Lieut. 


47 


1 February, 1759. 


Nicholson, William 


Ensign 


48 


20 July, 1758. 


Noble, Jerome 


Lieut. 


28 


22 January, 1755. 




Q r . M'. 


28 


9 March, 1757. 


Noel, Hon. Bennet 


Colonel 


43 


12 April, 1762. 




Lt. Gen. 




18 December, 1760. 


















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54 



British Officers serving in America. 



[elan, 



Nott, Robert 


Ensign 


GO 


Nugent,, Richard 


Lieut. 


15 


Nugent, Richard 


Captain 


N. Y 


Nugent, Richard 


Lieut. 


31 


Nugent, Walter 


Ensign 


43 




Lieut. 


43 


Nunn, John 


Ensign 


95 




Lieut. 


95 


Nuttall, John 


Captain 


58 


Nutterville, N. S. 


Ensign 


27 


O'Brien, Edward 


Captain 


52 


O'Connor, Edward 


Lieut. 


31 


Ogilvie, Francis 


Major 


-> 9 


Ogilvie, John 


Chaplain 


60 


Ogilvie, William 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 




Captain 


N. Y. 


Ogle, William 


Captain 


34 




Major 


34 


0'IIara, Brabazon 


Captain 


14 


Oliphant, David 


Surgeon 


So. Ca. 


Ore in, James 


Chaplain 


N. Y. 


Orme, Robert 


Captain 


Br. 


Orme, William 


Ensign 


58 




Lieut. 


58 


Ormsby, Arthur 


Captain 


22 


Ormsby, Arthur 


2 tl Lieut. 


dO 




Lieut. 


40 




A'lj 1 . 


40 


Ormsby, Eubulo 


Lieut. 


35 


Ormsby, .lames 


Ensign 


-45 




Lieut. 


45 




Adjt. 


45 




Lieut. 


45 


Ormsby, John 


Captain 


35 


Off, David 


Surgeon 


27 


Osborne, Charles 


Lieut. 


4G 


Osborne, Charles 


Capt. Lt. 


80 


Osborne, Charles 


Capt. Lt. 


44 


Osborne, Thomas 


Captain 


46 


Oswald, Thomas 


Captain 


62 


Otter, George 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


Otway, Charles 


Colonel 
Lt. Gen. 
General 


35 


Ouchterlony, David 


Lieut. 


62 




Captain 


60 


Oughton, Ja: Adolphus 


Colonel 
Maj. Gen. 


55 




Colonel 


31 


Ourry, Lewis 


Lieut. 


62 




Capt. Lt. 


60 




Captain 


60 



16 June, 1760. 

21 September, 1757. 
15 July, 1762. 

15 June, 1764. 

27 April, 1756. 
13 March, 1760. 
5 March, 1760. 
26 June, 1762. 

26 December, 1755. 

25 October, 1762. 

22 May, 1765. 

26 May, 1772. 

4 August, 1762. 

1 September, 1756. 
12 February, 1750-1, 

16 April, 1757. 

28 February, 1759. 

23 November, 1768. 

27 March, 1765. 
8 June, 1747. 
25 June, 1751. 

1755. 

28 August, 1756. 

18 October, 1760. 

5 July, 1758. 
30 June, 1755. 

29 February, 1760. 

30 September, 1761. 
21 January, 1758. 
30 November, 1756. 
8 February, 1761. 
29 April, 1761. 

19 March, 1764. 

24 February, 1756. 

17 September, 1760. 

2 February, 1757. 
12 February, 1759. 
16 August, 1760. 
21 July, 1758. 

25 December, 1755. 

3 February, 1756. 

25 July, 1758. 

26 July, 1717. 

28 May, 1745. 
8 March, 1761. 

7 February, 1756. 
15 April, 1759. 
20 July, 1759. 
15 August, 1761. 
20 August, 1762. 
14 January, 1756. 

29 August, 1759. 
12 December, 1760. 






• 


































































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1895.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



55 



Outerbridge, Walter 
Owen, Charles 



Owen, John 
Owen, Thomas 

Packenham, Robert 

Palmer, Francis 
Palmer, Hugh 
Pampillone, James 

Panier, 

Panmure, William, Earl of 



Papon, Stephen 

Par, George 
Parke, Andrew 
Parker, Edward 
Parker, George 
Parker, Hugh 
Parker, John 
Parker, John 

Parker, Nicholas 
Parker, William 
Parker, William 

Parry, Powell 
Parsons, Lawrence 



Partridge, Thomas 
Paschal, George 

Paste, Theophilus 

Paterson, John 
Paterson, Marcus 
Paterson, Peter 
Paterson, Peter 
Paterson, Walter 

Paterson, William 

Pateshall, Robert 

Patten, John 



Lieut. 
Ensign 
Q r . M\ 

Lieut. 
Colonel 
Maj. Gen. 
2 d Lieut. 
1 st Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Chaplain 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Colonel 

Lt. Gen. 

General 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Q r . M r . 

1 st Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Captain 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Adj H . 

Q r . M r . 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Mf. 

1 st Lieut. 

Capt. Lt.' 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 



So. Ca. 

59 
59 
59 
59 

94 
94 

64 
G4 
52 
14 
^9 
GO 
21 



22 
22 
15 

8 
35 
40 
27 
80 
GO 
27 
27 
95 
27 
27 
65 
10 
10 
10 
94 
17 
17 
15 
15 
15 
18 
80 
26 
80 
80 
69 
69 
40 
40 
40 
48 
48 



26 September, 1754. 
30 July, 1762. 

23 April, 1765. 

13 September, 1769. 

27 November, 1760. 

10 July, 1762. 

11 January, 1760. 
2 January, 1762. 

16 May, 1766. 

13 December, 1770. 
25 December, 1770. 

17 December, 1756. 
27 May,- 1758. 

25 February, 1756. 

29 April', 1752. 

24 January, 1758. 

30 April, 1770. 

27 April, 1756. 
1 July, 1762. 

4 May, 1761. 

13 April, 1767. 
30 October, 1761. 

28 June, 1755. 

15 September, 1764. 

25 December, 1757. 

12 February, 1759. 
17 September, 1760. 
15 September, 1764. 
7' March, 1760. 

21 October, 1761. 

28 September, 1762. 

14 November, 1771. 

13 February, 1765. 
4 December, 1769. 

13 February, 1762. 
21 September, 1756. 

25 May, 1759. 

1 October, 1755. 

26 September, 1760. 
4 May, 1761. 

1 October, 1766. 

3 December, 1759. 
26 September, 1760. 

29 December, 1757. 

4 October, 1760. 
25 June, 1 761. 

5 November, 1766. 

25 February, 1748-9. 
7 April, 1761. 

30 September, 1 761. 
29 April, 1760. 

26 April, 1762. 
















































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56 



British Officers serving in America. 



[Jan. 



Patterson, James 
Pattinson, Mathew 
Paulett, Charles 
Pauli, Christopher 

Pavey, Lewis 
Pawfett, William 
Payne, Benjamin Charles 
Payne, lien: Charnock 

Pears, Edward 
Peach, Joseph 
Peebles, John 
Peister, Ar. Schuyler de 
Pemberton, William 
Penier, Peter 
Pennington, George 
Perchard, Philip 
Percival, Joshua 
Perkins, William 
Peters, James 
Petrie, George 



Pettigrew, James 

Pexton, John 

Peyton, Henry 
Peyton, Yelverton 
Piister, Francis 



Phibbs, William 
Philips, John 
Phillips, Erasmus John 
Phillips, John 
Phillips, John 
Phillips, Ralph 



Phillips, Thomas 
Phillips, William Fred, 
Philpot, William 



Phyn, George 



Picketing, Sir Edward, Hart. 
Pictet, Marcus 
Piers, Newsham 



Capt. Lt. 


69 


Lieut. 


47 


Chaplain 


55 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


Captain 


59 


Lieut. 


^7 


Captain 


28 


Captain 


18 


Lieut. 


95 


Lieut. 


47 


Ensign 


42 


Captain 


8 


Surgeon 


21 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


44 


1 st Lieut. 


94 


Lieut. 


48 


Lieut. 


18 


Surgeon 


N. Y. 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


l at Lieut. 


21 


Adj't 


21 


Ensign 


10 


Lieut. 


10 


Ensign 


65 


Lieut. 


Cu) 


Ensign 


60 


Captain 


9 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


28 


l 8t Lieut. 


Rangers 


Lieut. 


45 


2 d Lieut. 


94 


Lieut. 


46 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


60 


Capt. Lt. 


60 


Captain 


52 


Lieut. 


35 


Ensign 


46 


Lieut. 


46 


Ensign 


44 


Lieut. 


44 


1" Lieut. 


21 


Adj't 


21 


Captain 


21 


Knsign 


46 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


62 



29 October, 1762. 
12 August, 1750. 
15 January, 1756. 
8 February, 1761. 
28 December, 1770. 
31 August, 1747. 
28 June, 1771. 

30 October, 1762. 

27 January, 1764. 
8 August, 1771. 

7 March, 1760. 

28 June, 1755. 
23 August, 1763. 

23 November, 1768. 
3 June,- 1771. 

8 March, 1757. 

6 November, 1755. 

7 March, 1760. 
1 July, 1755. 

1 January, 1766. 

17 November, 1760. 
6 May, 1763. 

6 October, 1769. 
28 August, 1771. 

24 July, 1766. 
28 June, 1771. 

28 February, 1766. 

8 May, 1771. 

25 March, 1757. 
13 June, 1765. 

15 September, 1758. 

18 September, 1760. 

9 October, 1767. 

22 November, 1756. 

25 September, 1761. 

1 October, 1755. 

29 September, 1761. 

2 October, 1766. 

29 December, 1755. 
5 December, 1756. 
12 December, 1760. 
28 December, 1755. 

16 May, 1757. 

2 February, 1757. 
12 February, 1759. 
24 July, 17*58. 
18 May, 1759. 

26 February, 1766. 
18 June, 1768. 

28 August, 1771. 

26 October, 1763. 

27 December, 1770. 
5 January, 1756. 













































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I 















1895.] 



British Officer's serving in America. 



57 



Pigott, John 
Pi'lott, Henry 



Pinckney, Thomas 

Pinhorwe, John 

Pitcher, James 
Pittnmn, Philip 
Pitman, Philip 
PJace, William de la 
Platers, John 
Piatt, Lime 

Pluckenett, 

Poe, John 
Pole, Mundy 
Poison, John 

Pomeroy, John 
Pooley, Shuldham 
Portis, Charles 

Porter, Frederick 
Potts, Alexander 
Potts, William 



Powell, IT. Watson 
Powell, Thomas 
Power, Nicholas 
Pownall, Edward 
Poyuton, B re re ton 

Prescott, Robert 
Prescott, Robert 

Prescott, William 

Preston, Achilles 

Preston, Charles 

Preston, John 
Preston, Thomas 
Preston, William 
Preston, William 
Prevost, Augustine 



VOL. XLIX. 



Lieut. 


59 


Lieut. 


31 


Adj't 


31 


Capt. Lt. 


31 


Captain 


31 


Ensign 


GO' 


Lieut. 


GO 


Lieut. 


45 


Corny of Must. Br. 


Ensign 


48 


Ensign 


15 


Captain 


2G 


Lieut. 


65 


Q r . MV 


60 


Chaplain 


52 


Ensign 


26 


Captain 


10 


Lieut. 


GO 


q\ u\ 


GO 


Colonel 


64 


Lieut. 


48 


Ensign 


35 


Lieut. 


35 


Captain 


62 


Surgeon 


42 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


GO 


Adj't 


GO 


Lieut. 


8 


Q r . M r . 


8 


Capt. Lt. 


8 


Captain 


di 


Ensign 


31 


Ensign 


60 


Captain 


34 


Ensign 


G2 


Lieut. 


GO 


Captain 


15 


Major 


95 


Major 


27 


Lieut. 


15 


Captain 


15 


Ensign 


44 


Lieut. 


44 


Captain 


26 


Major 


26 


Chaplain 


26 


Captain 


21) 


Lieut. 


44 


l Hl Lieut. 


22 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Lt. Col. 


60 



25 December, 1770. 

18 July, 1764. 

13 February, 176C. 

23 September, 1772. 

12 December, 1756. 
2^-April, 1760. 

20 May, 1752. 
1755. 

13 July, 1760. 
28 July, 1762. 
18 April, 1766. 

25 December, 1770. 

27 July, 1761. 

10 October, 1768. 
13 February, 1762. 
13 February, 1762. 
5 May, 1757. 
10 June, 1760. 
10 October, 1766. 

24 April, 1762. 

1 December, 1756. 

25 September, 1759. 

28 December, 1755. 
10 April, 1764. 

10 January, 1756. 
10 May, 1757. 

15 November, 1765. 

13 April, 1768. 
12 October, 1771. 

2 September, 1756. 

29 July, 1765. 

14 September, 1760. 
10 August, 1764. 

25 December, 1755. 

30 November, 1756. 
22 January, 1755. 

22 March,* 1761. 
24 July, 1762. 

30 September, 1757. 

2 May, 1762. 
14 May, 1757. 

8 August, 1758. 
12 May, 1759. 

7 September, 1768. 

23 February, 1741-2. 

[1766]. 
4 November, 1755. 

9 March, 1764. 

24 July, 1758. 
6 May, 1761. 

10 May, 1764. 

3 November, 1769. 


























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' 































































































. 












58 



\tish Officers serving in America. 



[Jan. 



Prevost, Augustine 



Provost, James 

Prevost, Marcus 
Price, Arthur 

Price, George 

Price, Herbert 
Price, Joseph 
Price, Stephen 

Price, William 
Prideaux, Edmund 
Prideaux, John 
Prideaux, Sir John Wilmot 
Prince, Joseph 
Pringle, Royle 
Pringle, Francis 
Pringle, Henry 

Pringle, James 
Pringle, Robert 

Pringle, 

Proby, Thomas 
Pryce, David 
Pulleine, Henry 
Purcell, Toby 
Rainsford, Andrew 

Ralfe, James 

Ramsay, Hon. Malcolm 



Ramsay, William 

Randall, Thomas 
Rattray, George 
Ratzer, Bernard 
Ray, Joseph 

Raymond, William 
Rea, Daniel 
Rend, James 
Rend, William 
Reed, John 
Reid, Alexander 
Reid, John 



Major 


C2 


Lieut. Col. 


GO 


Lieut. Col. 


CO 


Lieut. 


GO 


Col. Com* 


G2 


Maj. Gen. 




Captain 


62 


Lieut. 


47 


Captain 


47 


Ensign 


GO 


Lieut. 


GO 


2 d Lieut. 


94 


Lieut. 


95 


2 d Lieut. 


94 


1 st Lieut. 


94 


Ensign 


46 


Ensign 


18 


Colonel 


55 


Ensign 


18 


Captain 


62 


Ensign 


27 


Lieut. 


62 


Capt. Lt. 


27 


Captain 


27 


Lieut. Col. 


59 


Ensign 


14 


Ensign 


27 


Major 


55 


Ensign 


44 


Major 


16 


Lieut. 


43 


Lieut. 


9 


Capt. Lt. 


9 


Ensign 


62 


Lieut. 


60 


1 st Lieut. 


21 


Capt. Lt. 


21 


Captain 


21 


Ensign 


60 


Lieut. 


60 


Ensign 


52 


Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


62 


Lieut. 


62 


Q r . M r . 


60 


Ensign 


18 


Captain 


21 


Ensign 


59 


Ensign 


95 


Lieut. Col. 


34 


Captain 


42 


Captain 


42 


Major 


42 



9 January, 1756. 

20 March, 1761. 

13 December, 1765. 

25 June, 1771. 
28 October, 1761. 

3 June, 1762. 

17 January, 1756. 

26 June, 1754. 

27 May, 1760. 

18 May, 1761. 

4 October, 1770. 

21 Julv, 1760. 
7 March, 1760. 
12 January, 1760. 
2 January, 1762. 
26 July, 1758. 

12 January, 1770. 

20 October, 1758. 
23 December, 1767. 
16 January, 1756. 
23 October, 1761. 
31 December, 1755. 
2 February, 1757. 

21 July, 1758. 
21 March, 1765. 
26 December, 1770. 
G September, 1762. 
21 December, 1755. 
1 July, 1763. 

15 June, 1764. 
9 April, 1756. 

1 September, 1756. 
25 March, 1765. 

24 January, 1756. 

25 May, 1757. 

16 January, 1765. 

6 October, 17G9. 

25 December, 1770. 

7 December, 1756. 

26 July, 1758. 

3 June, 1771. 

19 July, 1757. 

20 February, 1756. 

4 February, 1756. 
18 August, 1756. 

11 September, 1765. 

2 January, 1765. 
28 January, 1763. 
25 November, 1760. 
7 January, 1762. 

21 July, "l 758. 

3 June, 1752. 

1 August, 1759. 














































" 






























. 








































































. 




















. 






































































1805.] Harvard University. 59 



HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 

College Presidents and the Election of Messrs. Quincy and 

Eliot. 
By the Hon. Wm. A. Richardson (II. U. 1843), LL.D., Chief-Justice Court of Claims. 

[The following article from " The University Magazine" for 
December, 1891, is republished as a valuable contribution to 
history, and an Interesting and appropriate tribute to President 
Eliot in addition to the exercises at Harvard Commencement last 
.June in commemoration of his successful administration of the 
presidency during more than twenty-five years.] 

When I contemplate the vast changes that have taken place in all 
brandies <>f the University, in the undergraduate department and in the 
professional schools, as well as the growth developed during the past twenty 
years or so, considered with reference to their origin, the wisdom of their 
conception, the energy of their execution and the grand success which has 
attended them, I am more impressed than ever with what I have long since 
observed : that a university in this country is just what its president makes it. 

All the professors and instructors combined, however learned, cannot 
advance the prosperity of a college as an able President, adapted to the 
times, may do by his genius, energy and inspiration; so great is his in- 
fluence on the affairs of the institution. 

Prof. Bryce, in his recently published work, "The American Common- 
wealth," says: "A visitor from Europe is struck by the prominence of the 
president in an American university or college, and the almost monarchial 
position which he sometimes occupies towards the professors as well as 
towards the students. Far more authority seems to be vested in him, far 
more to turn upon his individual talents and "character than in the univer- 
sities of Europe. Neither the German Pro-Rector, nor the Vice-Chancellor 
in Oxford or Cambridge, nor the Principal in a Scottish university, nor the 
Provost of Trinity College in Dublin, nor the head in one of the colleges 
in Oxford or Cambridge is anything like so important a personage in re- 
spect to his ollice, whatever influence his individual gifts may give him, as 
an American college President." 

Institutions are not exceptions to the natural law of growth and decay 
which pervades the entire universe. A college that is not progressing is 
more or less rapidly running behind, as though touched by a withering 
hand. The genius of a President may infuse such life into it as to cause 
its prosperity to continue for several years after his retirement, as wheels 
set in motion by an active power continue to roll on after the power is re- 
moved, but a time comes when the stored force becomes exhausted and the 
wheels must stop unless the power be renewed. 

Other colleges than Harvard have furnished marked instances of the in- 
fluence of the strong individuality and genius of some of their Presidents. 
Union College came into prominence under the long term of Rev. Dr. Nott, 
the distinguished, popular and beloved President of that, institution, which 
he raised from a feeble condition to the', front rank of the colleges of his 
time. Williams College had new life and vigor infused into it by Dr. 
Hopkins, who greatly increased the number of students by his magnetic 
attraction, endeared himself to a large body of men educated under his in- 



GO Harvard University. [J;m. 

fluence, and left the college flourishing and in the highest state of prosperity. 
The College of New Jersey (popularly known as Princeton), advanced 
under the inspiration of the Rev. Dr. McCosh, whose strong mind and will 
have left their impression upon all its aifairs. 

In early, as well as in recent years. Harvard has been controlled to a 
large extent by Presidents, who, exactly suited to the times, successfully 
carried the college through dilliculties and dangers which disturbed its use- 
fulness and sometimes even threatened its very existence. John Leverett 
was president from 1707 to 1724, a period when party strife raged with 
great bitterness among the friends of the institution, and with such ability, 
discretion and skill did he pilot the college amidst all its troubles, that Mr. 
Quincy, in his History of Harvard, was led to express his views of the in- 
fluence of the heads of colleges in these general terms, but with special 
reference to President Leverett: "Institutions among the tumults of 
party discord, like ships among the strife of warring elements, are often 
urged onward with accelerated force by the tempest, which at first retarded 
their progress, and even threatened their destruction. Success in both 
cast's depends on the firmness and skill of the pilot." 

Hut, modern instances are the special subject of this article. I remember 
many years ago, that after Mr. Quincy had left the Presidency and was 
living in dignified retirement in Boston, he attended a commencement din- 
ner, at which, of course, he was called out among the first speakers. 

Rising from his seat, he began by stating that, as he was expecting to be 
called upon for an extemporaneous speech; he had prepared himself for it by 
writing out what he had to say. at the same time producing a fully written 
document, which lie proceeded to read. II is memory had for some years 
been gradually failing, and he feared to trust himself to make an extern- 
poraueoiis Speech in any other way. 

lie went on and told the alumni present the circumstances leading to his 
election as President of the college, and they were, as I now remember 
them, substantially as follows: Judge Story and Mr. Bowditch, the great 
mathematician, both of the corporation, of which they were a committee 
for that purpose, came to his house and said they wanted him to take the 
Presidency of Harvard College, then recently vacated by the resignation of 
the Rev. Dr. iCirklaud. Said he, " X should not have been more astonished 
had I been called to the pastorate of the Old South Church, for up to that 
time the heads of institutions of learning had always been selected from the 
clergy, who had come to regard them as the prizes of their profession 
alone." The committee explained to him why they wanted him to under- 
take the duties of the office. Under the administration of Dr. Kirkland, 
a godly and easy-going man, the discipline of the college had fallen into a 
low state, and the finances were in a loose and disordered condition, both of 
which they were sure he could improve. He still hesitated and raised 
objections, but all were overcome, and he was made President of the college 
in January, 1821). 

Mr. Quincy had great experience in affairs. He had held many offices, 
the most recent being that of Mayor of Boston, which he had held for six 
successive terms, the last, of which had expired the December previous, 
when he declined re-election. As mayor, ho had displayed great ability and 
force; of character*, which marked him as the man for the occasion to improve 
the condition of the University. His administration was a success for the 
time., and under the circumstances. Abolishing the "Med-Fac Society" 
and the " Engine Club," nurseries of insubordination, lie introduced a 
severe and stern method of discipline, adapted to the then existing order 












■ 



< 
■ 


















i 



1805.] Harvard University . 61 

of things, but wholly different from the self-reliant system and the refined 
standard which prevail to-day. The finances, too, were put in a healthy 
condition. 

On the whole, the college is greatly indebted to Mr. Quiney for what he 
did, and he must be considered as one of its great Presidents. 

The election of John Leverett, in 1707, might seem to be an exception 
to Mr. Quincy's statement that none but clergymen had previously been 
elected Presidents. It is true that Mr. Leverett was also a judge, but he 
had studied theology, was a theologian identified with the clergy, and it was 
upon him, in 1GD2, that the college first conferred the degree of bachelor 
of Divinity. In early colonial times, when there were few or no lawyers, 
exclusively educated as such, it was not uncommon for clergymen to be 
appointed judges.* 

It was a well known fact that Rev. Cotton Mather all his life labored 
under a burning ambition to become President of the college, which would 
place him at the head of the clergy, and so make him the most influential 
person in public affairs in those days when the clergy ruled the colony. In 
1724, the corporation and overseers elected as President Rev. Joseph 
Sewall, who, however, declined the appointment. The day after this 
election Cotton Mather made this remarkable entry in his diary : "I am 
informed that yesterday the six men who call themselves the Corporation 
of the College, met, and, contrary to the epidemical expectation of the 
country, chose a modest young man, of whose piety (and little else) every 
one gives a laudable character. I always foretold these two things of the 
Corporation : First, that if it were possible for them to steer clear of me 
they will do so; secondly, that if it were possible for them to act foolishly 
they will do so. 

" The perpetual envy with which my essays to serve the kingdom of God 
are treated among them, and the dread that Satan has of my beating up his 
quarters at the college, led me into the former sentiment; the marvellous in- 
discretion with which the affairs of the college are managed led me into the 
latter." 

Cotton Mather was, withal, something of a demagogue, between whom 
and the corporation there could be little sentiment in common. At all 
periods of time the corporation has had upon its board men, the wisest, 
most broad-minded and most liberal to be found in the community, and 
such men could have no sympathy with Rev. Cotton Mather. He never 
obtained the object of his ambition, and died without having been President 
of Harvard College. 

In September, 1868, the office of President became vacant by the resig- 
nation of the late Rev. Dr. Thomas Hill, (my beloved classmate and friend): 
the corporation had the responsibility cast upon it of finding a suitable 
successor. Two members of the Board were and long had been connected 
with the Merrimac Manufacturing Company, whose works were at Lowell 
«* — lion. .John A. Lowell and lion. Francis 15. Crowninshield, the former as 

one of the directors and the latter as treasurer. In the practical organi- 
zation of the Massachusetts manufacturing companies the treasurer is the 
general manager upon whose skill and judgment the success of the corpora- 
tion depends, as much as does that of a college upon its President. He is 

* The Court of Oyer and Terminer, organized in 1692 l>y the Governor of Massachusetts 

without authority of law, to try persons accused of witchcraft was composed of two elergy- 

fc men, two physicians, and three merchants, with a merchant for Special Attorney. General. 

Nathaniel Sa'ltonstall, first named as one of the Judges, then a distinguished military man 

* v and afterwards Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, " refused to proceed in the trials in 

which i he court was engaged," and a merchant was appointed in his place. 

VOL. XL1X. G* * 









' 









' 









, 















62 Harvard University. [.Tan. 

a well paid officer, while the directors, of wliom the president is little more 
than a figure-head, serve without compensation, and usually give little 
attention to the business except when called together by the treasurer for 
consultation in relation to important movements and extensive changes. 
Messrs. Lowell and Crowninshield were able and astute men who had the 
interests of the college deeply at heart. 

Three years and a half before that time it had become necessary to 
appoint a new superintendent (locally called agent) of the mills at Lowell. 
This position is one of great difficulty} requiring not only thorough know- 
ledge of business, but capacity to manage a great body of operatives, keep 
them satisfied and contented, and obtain the greatest product from their 
intelligent labor. In importance he is second only to the treasurer, to 
whom he is adjutant and assistant. It is not easy to determine upon which 
of the two the success of the corporation more largely depends. It is im- 
portant to the treasurer that he should have an able and skillful superin- 
tendent, and a new appointment is always a matter of anxiety to him, of 
solicitude to the directors and of interest to the stockholders. 

By some means, while Mr. Eliot was tutor and assistant professor at 
Harvard, the treasurer and directors had formed a high opinion of his 
executive ability and his skill in the general management of affairs. The 
superintendency was offered him at a salary of $5,000 a year and the use 
of a house. This was a large compensation for the times, two-thirds more, 
in money, than the then established salary of the President of Harvard. 
The offer was a tempting one to a young man thirty-one years of age, and 
of limited means. Mr. Eliot was in Rome when the offer was received. 
After a week's reflection he decided to stick to education as the business of 
which he knew the most and for which he thought himself best fitted, and 
the appointment was declined. A few weeks later he was invited to a 
professorship in the then newly established Institute of Technology, to be 
opened in Boston, October 1, 180,3, with a much smaller salary; and that 
offer being in the line of his studies and his ambition, it was accepted. 
Thus the Merrimac Manufacturing Company missed a valuable superin- 
tendent who might have increased the dividends of the stockholders, and 
there was reserved to the college one who was destined to become its 
President with a long and brilliant administration. 

It was natural that Mr. Crowninshie'd and Mr. Lowell, who had become 
impressed in 1805 with Mr. Eliot's capacity and capabilities, should in the 
winter of 1868-9 bring him before the corporation of the college as a 
suitable person for President. To the four other members of that body 
Mr. Eliot was well known, and I apprehend it was an easy matter to obtaiu 
their unanimous vote for his election. He was also somewhat known to 
the Overseers, being himself a member of the Board, to which he had been 
elected by the alumni on Commencement Day, 1868, under the then newly 
adopted system of election. 

In February and March, 1869, while the presidential vacancy still re- 
mained Unfilled, there appeared in the Atlantic Monthly two articles on 
"The New Education," which were kr.own to have been written by Mr. 
Eliot. These articles were so full of deep thought and progressive ideas 
that they made a decided impression on the Overseers and friends of the 
college and unmistakably marked their author as the man for President. I 
have i always though! that those articles contributed largely, if not to his 
nomination, at least to his ultimate confirmation by the Board of Overseers. 

lie was elected by the corporation March P2, and nominated to the 
Overseers March 18, 1869. Many of the Board doubted the expediency of 



1 



181)5.] Harvard University. G3 



trusting so great responsibilities to so young a man. Ilia age was much 
below that of any former President, except the first, Henry Dunster, who 
held the office in the day of small tilings for the college, during whose whole 
fourteen years of service there were graduated but seventy-four persons. 

The nomination, on the day of its presentation, was referred to a com- 
mittee of four, who made their report April 7, unanimously recommending 
that the election be confirmed. Still a majority of the Board hesitated. 
The matter was put over to an adjourned meeting, April 21. On that 
day it was voted kk that the communication from the corporation in refer- 
^ ene'e to the election of Mr. Eliot as President of the University be referred 

back to the corporation." 

Subsequently, May 19, the corporation replied that " they remain 
unanimously of the opinion that their action in electing Mr. Eliot is adapted 
to promote the best interests of the University." In the meantime a 
majority of the corporation had evidently come to the consciousness of the 
fact that youth is an objection to which time is constantly applying a 
remedy, while age is always advancing with increasing infirmities and disa- 
bilities. Old men will go on very well in the beaten track they have 
travelled for years, but for enterprise and vigorous action young men of 
ambition and elements of growth are much better. 

An informal vote was taken at that meeting and resulted fifteen in the 
affirmative and nine in the negative. On a formal ballot, which imme- 
diately followed, the nomination wp,s confirmed by a vote of sixteen to 
m r eight, and Mr. Eliot was declared elected. 

The wisdom of the choice has been proved by more than twenty years of 
successful administration, during which the college has prospered as it never 
prospered before, 
d What I have written in relation to Mr. Eliot is drawn from personal 

knowledge. About the time he was offered the position of superintendent 
of the Merrimack Mills I was one of the directors of the company, of whom 
I am the last survivor, and the offer is now known only to himself and to 
me. When he was chosen President of the college I\vas one of the Board 
of Overseers, serving the last year of my first term by election of the Leg- 
islature, under the old but not the oldest system. Having been re-elected 
by the alumni under the new system, I continued to serve on the Board for 
six years thereafter while he was preparing the ground, planting the seed 
and developing of his ideas, the steady growth of which I have ever since 
watched with deep interest and with great pride for my Alma Mater. 

Mr. Eliot, with becoming modesty, attributes much of the success of the 
college during his administration to the circumstances of the times and the 
development of the nation in wealth, self-reliance and intelligence. It is 
no doubt true that the condition of affairs has been favorable for his work, 
but that detracts nothing from the credit due to him, nor lessens the true 
estimate of his ability. Me may be regarded as the fortunate man who, 
j^J taking the college at the flood-tide of affairs, has led it on to fortune, while 

in other less skillful hands it might have been "bound in shallows and in 
miseries." The success of real ability is often attributed to good luck, but 
the difference between the lucky and the unlucky man is that the former 
takes advantage of opportunities and makes the most of them, while the 
latter lets them pass by unobserved and unused. 

Success always springs from the contact of favorable circumstances with 
faculty, as does the spark from the sudden contact of a flint with the steel. 
Talent works in rich and fertile fields, while dullness is doomed to scratch 
in barren places. 



1. 



G4 Shawe. [Jan. 

It was my intention in this article to point out the growth of the Univer- 
sity in all its departments, giving in detail the numerous changes, additions 
and improvements iniroduced during the past twenty years, and I collected 
much material for that purpose. But the quantity proved so great that I 
have not found time to spare from my official and public duties to properly 
digest and arrange the same, and have, therefore, concluded to lay it aside 
for the present, and to publish the article as it is. 



SHAWE. 

Communicated by Hon. M. F. King, of Portland, Maine. 

Mr. J. IIorsfall Turner, of Idel, Bradford, Eng., contributes 
the following extracts from the Halifax, York, Register of baptisms 
of persons by the name Shawe. 

James filius Anthony do Ovenden Dec. 6 1590 
Anthony filius Anthony de Ovenden July 16 1592 
Joseph filius Anthony de Ovenden July 25 1593 
Anthony filius Anthony de Ovenden July 6 1595 
Mark filius Anthony de Ovenden March 12 1597 
John filius Anthony de Ovenden March 16 1599 
Susannah filia Henry de Ovenden March 1587 
Joshua lilius Henry de Ovenden June G 1591 
Ruth filia Henry de Ovenden May 29 1595 
Grace filia Henry de Ovenden March 16 1599 
Ruth filia John de Ovenden March 9 1588 
Benjamin lilius John de Ovenden February 1585 
Susan lilia Cuthbert de Ovenden November 1586 
Martha lilia Thomas de Overden September 9 1599 
Mary lilia Gabriel de Halifax Oetober 28 1599 
Richard lilius Richard de Midgley December 1594 
Mary lilia Richard de Wailey 1588 

John lilius Uichard de War ley Aug 26 1599 
Richard lilius Richard de Warley December 1 1601 
John lilius Thomas de Hipperholme August 1586 
Klfan lilius Thomas de Hipperholme May 2 1588 
William lilius Edward de Hipperholme March 1587 
Edward lilius Edward do Hipperholme January 30 1596 
Sarah lilia Thomas de Northouram April 9 1592 
Joseph lilius Thomas de Northouram June 13 1596 
Mary lilia Thomas de Northouram August 8 1596 
Jonas lilius Thomas de Northouram June 5 1597 

He also notes the burial of children of Abraham Shawe, Martha 
born 1023, on March 31, 1G25, and John born 1628, on April 12, 
1621). 

The wile of Abraham Shawe was Briggit, daughter of Henry 
Best of Ovenden, baptized April 9, 151)2. She had sister Mary, 
bapt. Aug. 1-1, 1586, and brother John, bapt. March 10, 1587. 



r 






1805.] English Ancestors of John Bent. 65 



THE ENGLISH ANCESTORS OF JOHN BENT, OF 

SUDBURY. 

By E. C. Felton, Esq., of Steelton, Pennsylvania. 

John Bknt, the first of the surname in New England, settled in 
Sudbury* and shared in the first and seeond divisions of hind there 
in 1631) and 1640.* He is said to have been one of Maj. Simon 
Wiitard's troopers in the fruitless expedition against Ninigret in 
October, 1654. f His name appears in 1656 as one of the peti- 
tioners to the General Court for a grant of the land which subse- 
quently formed the town of Marlborough. J He died in Sudbury, 
27 September, 1672, and seems to have been a prosperous and 
public-spirited man. His descendants settled during the seventeenth 
century in Marlborough, Framingham and Milton. The following 
details in regard to his English ancestors will certainly be of interest 
to his numerous descendants in America. 

The difficulty which exists in establishing the English homes of 
many of the early emigrants to New England does not confront us 
in the case of John Bent. His name occurs on the list of passengers 
sailing in the ship Confidence from Southampton, 24 April, 1638, 
now on file in the Public Record Office in London. § The record 
is as follows : — 

35. John Bent of Penton in the County of South' Husbandman. 
MaVt'Ko; his wife; Robert, Will him, Peter, John and Aim their children; 
ull uiuVcr yo ago of xij yeures.J] 

There is further mention of him in Lctchford's JVote Booh. 9 ^ 
"John Bent of Sudbury in New England late of Waybill in the 
County of Southampton husbandman makes a letter of Attorney 
unto his brother-in-law Will 111 Baker of New Sarum in the County 
of Wilti's 1 Mummer to receive & recover of and from Will" 1 Cole of 
Waybill aforesaid husbandman the summe of twenty pounds of law- 
ful money of England w ch he owes him by bond now in the hands 
of my sayd Attorney."** 

On this side of the Atlantic the files of the Middlesex County 
Courtff and of the Salem Court|| give clear evidence as to the 
English home of John's mother Agnes. 

* Harry's History of Framingham. 

f Ibid. This may have been John's son John, who at tho time of the expedition was 
nineteen. The father was fifty-eight, and it hardly seems probable that he was one of the 
expedition. 

X Hudson's History of Marlborough. 

$ State Papers, Colonial, vol. ix., No. 99. 

j| The agos given in the shipping list are incorrect. John was forty-two instead of thirty - 
five, mi'd his eldest son thirteen at the date of their emigration. 

II Pago -2'Xi o!' the printed nliil..n. 

** In ihe shipping list John Bout is mentioned as being of Penton, while Letrhlord makes 
him of Waybill. Waybill is the nnmo of a parish in which the hamlet of Penton or Pen- 
nington Grafton is situated. 
\ ft Harry's History of Framingham, 

%X Putnam's Monthly Historical Magazine, April— May, 1891. 









" 






























66 English Ancestors of John Bent. [Jan. 

The dwelling place of the emigrant in England being thus con- 
clusively established, an examination of the Parish Registers at 
Waybill and of the Bent wills in the Registry at Winchester give 
very lull and satisfactory information as to at least three generations 
of the family to which John Bent belonged. The Registers of the 
Parish of Waybill as now existing begin in 1564./ The following 
are the entries which are of interest : 



1564. Edith Bent daughter of John Bent was baptized 16. September. 
15G6. Edward Bent was buried 19. May. 

Robert Bent son of John was baptized 29. September. 
1568. David Bent son of John Bent was baptized 13. October. 
1570. Joan Bent daughter of John Bent was baptized 23. November. 

John Bent was buried 3. December. 
1572. Maria Bent was baptized. 13. January. 
1574. Anna Bent widow was buried 15. July. 

Joan Bent daughter of John Bent was baptized 12. November. 
1577. Richard Bent son of John Bent was baptized 5. February. 
1579. Alice Bent daughter of John Bent was baptized 7. June. 
1582. Agnes Bent daughter of John Bent was baptized 27. February. 
158 1. Henry Bent and Thomasen Gowers were married 5. October. 
1585. John Bent was baptized 19. September and was buried 26. Sep- 
tember. 
15*7. John Bent was buried 12. July. 

1588. Joan Bent widow was buried 7. September. 

1589. Robert Bent and Agnes Gosling were married 13. October. 

1590. Margery Bent daughter of Robert Bent was baptized 28. March. 

1591. Maria Bent daughter of John Bent was buried 30. January. 

1592. Richard Bent son of Robert Bent was baptized 7. May. 
1596. John Bent son of Robert Bent was baptized 20. November. 
1598: Maria Bent daughter of Robert Bent was baptized 24. September. 
1599. Maria Bent daughter of Robert Bent was buried 2. February. 

Dennis Bent daughter of Robert Bent was baptized 10. December. 
1602. Peter Bent was buried 18. May. 

Agnes Bent daughter of Robert Bent was baptized 16. July. 
1624.* Robert the son of John Bent bapt. Jan. 10. 
1626. William Baker and Dennis Bent married May the eighth. 

William Bent the son of John Bent was baptized the 24 of Oc- 
tober. 

1629. Peter the son of John Bent was baptized the 14 day of April. 

1630. Richard Barnes and Ann Bent Were married the 11 th day of 

April. 
Richard son of Richard Barnes was baptized the 20 th of February. 

1631. Robert Bout was buried the 29 day of -July. 

1635. John the sou of John Bent was baptized the 24 th of Jan. 

The three wills following, which are given in abstract only, will 
be found to supplement and render clearer the entries on the Parish 

Registers. 

* 'I lie Register is evidently defective for 1GI&, 1620, 1(521 and 1G22, as thorc are but three 
entries in the lour years. 















. 















• 









1895.] English Ancestors of John Bent. G7 

John Bent of Penton Grafton in the parish of Waybill, 10. June 1588. 
Proved 1H. Sept. 1588. To the parish church at Wayhill twelve pence. 
To the poor man's box six shillings eight pence. My son Robert Bent. 
David Bent my son. Richard Bent my son. Edith Bent my daughter. 
Marie Bent my daughter. Joan Bent my daughter. Alice Bent my 
daughter. Agnes Bent my daughter. My son David aforesaid. My 
wife Edith Bent executrix. Overseers my loving friends John Grace 
and Richard Cole. Witnesses Walter Waight, Robert Man-field, Henry Fan. 

Inventory £13. 0. 6. Consistory Court of Winton. 

Edith Bent of Calne in the county of Wilts widow, 15. June 1G01. 
Proved 30. Sept. 1601. To the parish church at Calne four pence. To 
the pool' man's box there four pence. My son Richard Bent. My cousin 
Richard Bent son of Robert Bent. My son in law John Williams wheat 
at Waybill. My daughter Ann Street. My daughter Joan Nash.* My 
son David Bent executor. Overseers Robert Tarrant of Clanlield and 
Richard Cole of Pennington Grafton. Before Philip Roche vicar there, 
Richard Fowler clerk. Henry Pears, Nicholas Gawen, Richard Pester 
with others. Consistory Court of Winton. 

The inventory, dated 19 June, 1601, describes the testatrix as of 
Penton Grafton. 

Robert Bent of Penton Grafton in the parish of Wayhill. (No date and 
no Probate Act.) To the church a noole. To the poor ten groats. My 
son Robert Bent. My son John Bent. His son Robert. William the son 
of said John Bent. Peter son of said John Bent. A^nes daughter of said 
John Bent. William Baker my son in law. My daughter Dennis his 
wife. Elizabeth Baker daughter of said William. Obadiah son of said 
William Baker. Their mother my daughter Dennis. My daughter Agnes 
Barnes. Her son young Richard Barnes. My daughter Jane wife of 
Robert Plimpton. Robert Plimpton their son. Thomas Plimpton their 
son. William Plimpton their son. Jane Plimpton their "daughter. Eliza- 
beth Plimpton daughter of said Robert five pounds. My aunt Drew. My 
sister Agnes Street. Joan Noyes my sister wife of William Noyes. Rest 
of goods to wife (not mentioned by name) whom I make "executor." My 
son William Baker and his wife. My daughter Jane. The live pounds 
given to my cousin Elizabeth Plimpton. Neighbors Peter Noyes and 
Henry Tuncks overseers. Agnes Bent daughter of Richard Bent. Mary 
Bent daughter of Richard Bent. Witnesses George Tarrant Minister of 
Wayhill, Peter Noyes, Henry Tuncks. Consistory Court of Winton. 

Inventory dated *30. Aug. 1:63>1. Amount £107. 1. 2. 

There are other Bent wills in the Registry at Winchester which 
have not been examined. That of Edward Pent, dated 1558, may 
be the will of the father of John, the grandfather of the emigrant 
John. The data given above will, however, make it easy lor any 
one interested to construct a reasonably complete genealogy of the 
English forefathers of John Pent for the two generations preceding 
his coming to New England, besides establishing relationships with 
several families which emigrated at about the same time as he.'f' 

* rrokibly a mistake of copyist for Noyes. See Will of Robert. 

t A genealogy <>f tlVo early geireVaiioiiB of the New England family of Rent, by Allen II. 
Bent, Esq., is printed in the Rkgistku for July, 1894, page !2S8. — Editoe. 



G8 BeUcnap. [Jan, 



BELKNAP. 

By Akthur Amort Cobman, Esq. 

Tins name appears to have been originally Bealhnap. Jamie- 
son defines Beale or Beal, "a passage between hills; a narrow 
pass." Knap is a low hill or knoll. There is, perhaps, somewhere 
in England, in the immediate vieinity of a "narrow pass," a little 
hill which bears, or which once bore, the name of the Bealhnap, and 
which gave rise to this surname. "The Book of Dignities "mentions 
"1374 Robt. de Bealknap, aft. Sir R." In Rymer's Fcedera, vol. 
vi., p. (523, is found the name of Robertus Bealknap, one of the 
King's "dilectes ei ftdeles" under date of A. I). 13(59, An. 43. 
E. 3. In the same 'work, vol. x., p. 204, A. D. 1422, An. 10. 
II. f>, mention is made of Johane Bealknap, as the first-mentioned 
of four " I )amoiselles de nostre Trcschcre Compaigne " — evidently 
maids of honor to the Queen. Tn the same volume, p. 3N7, ap- 
pears the name of (Irisell Bealknap. Tlie.se ladies were probably 
daughters of Sir Robert, generally spoken of as Sir Robert Belknap 
— the only man of the name, of his generation, of whom I find 
record. Hume says, "Sir Robert Bclknappe, Chief Justice of the 
Common Pleas," was one of the Judges appealed to by Charles II. 
to decide as to his right of restoration to the crown, and who be- 
cause they decided in the King's favor were declared guilty of high 
treason by the House of Peers, "after a very short interval, without 
hearing a witness, without examining a fact, or deliberating on one 
point of law." Sir Robert Bealknap, Bclknappe, or Belknap, was 
the first of four generations of knights, his son Hamon or Hamond, 
grandson Henry, and great-grandson Edward, having each been 
knighted. The blood of the first three of these flows in the veins of 
some of the best families of England, but unfortunately for the in- 
terest of the American Bclknaps, they are, apparently, not descended 
from Sir Robert, for I find mention of only his son Sir Hamon ; — 
it is however, possible, of course, that Sir Hamon may have had 
brothers. Sir Hamon had three sons, but only one of them left an 
heir. "Sir Hamon Belknap left three sons, John, William and 
Henry, each of whom successively inherited this manor. The lat- 
ter, on the death of his brothers, s.p., becoming possessed of it, 
resided at Bcccles in Sussex. He died in (he third year of the 
reign of King Henry VII. leaving a son Kdward and four daughters, 
lie' Whs succeeded in this manor by Edward, his son, who became 
a great warrior and a man of much public action, and was of the 
privy-council both to King Henry VII. and VI 1 1, lie resided at 
Weston in Warwickshire, and was afterwards knighted, and died in 
the 12th year of that reign, without issue ; on which his four sisters 
* became his co-heirs." (//asled's ULst of Kent.') 















- 






1895.] .Probate Courts of Massachusetts. 69 

There are numerous references to the name of Belknap in the two 
histories of Kent, PInlipott's and Hasted's, and occasionally in Home 
of (lie oilier County [Iistories^ but they almost all refer to this 
knightly line who held a great number of manors. The only other 
Belknaps of whom I find mention in England are the following: — 
Philip Belknap, Mayor of Canterbury, died 14,57, leaving, appa- 
rently, no son. Symon Belknap "of Knole, in Kent," is mentioned 
in the Visitations of Essex, but Hasted has no mention of him. 
In Bloinefiekl's Norfolk, in the account of the church of Wmeham, 
is mentioned the following inscription on one of the upper or cleres- 
tory windows, in old English lettering: — 

"Orate pro anima Willielmi Attehill. 

Pray for the soul of John Belknap, Gen." 

At Somerset House is the Will (dated 1599) of Josias Belknappe 
"of Sebridg wth eo. of Harford" — Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire. 
He mentions his brother, Bennett Belknappe, but no wife or child. 



PROBATE COURTS OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

By Hon. George White, A.M., LL.B., Judge of Probate and Insolvency for Norfolk 

County. 

Tin-: article on the "Probate Forms of Massachusetts," in the 
Rkuisteu for duly, 1894, reminds me of another important change 
in relation to the Probate Courts effected by legislation emanating 
from the same source. 

Before 1859 the Judges of Probate were fixtures in their respec- 
tive counties ; as no provision of law existed for transacting official 
business in their absences. In earlier days when the business was 
small and the times lor holding court, fixed by the Judges them- 
selves, were few and far between, the inconvenience was little felt ; 
and several judges continued in office for more than thirty years 
without absence from their duties by reason of illness or otherwise 
to any troublesome extent. 

But when the business was enormously enlarged by the great in- 
crease in population and wealth, and by additional jurisdiction from 
time to time conferred by the Legislature, the inconvenience became 
real and serious. This was much intensified when, in 1858, the 
Legislature united the offices of Judge of Insolvene.y (established 
in 1856) and Judge of Probate, providing for one judge in each 
county to be ex-officio Judge of the Probate Court and Court of 
Insolvency. 
* The Revised Statutes of 1836. contained a provision (Ch. 83, 

l 915) that when a Judge of Probate was interested in any case, the 

vol. xlix. 7 



70 Probate Courts of Massachusetts. [Jan. 

same should be transferred to the most ancient adjoining county, 
except in Nantucket and Dukes County when it should be trans- 
ferred to Barnstable County. The Act' of 1856, Ch. 284, establish- 
ing Courts of Insolvency, with one judge in each county, contained 
the following provision : 

Sec. 5. If any of said judges shall, from sickness, absence or other 
cause, be unable to perform the duties required of him, in any case arising 
within 1 1 Is jurisdiction, or shall be interested in any such case, the duties 
required of him shall, if such case shall arise in the county of Dukes 
County or Nantucket, be performed by the judge of the insolvency court 
of Barnstable County; and if such case shall arise in any other county than 
DukeS County or Nantucket, such duties shall be performed by the judge of 
the insolvency court of that adjoining county having the least number of 
inhabitants according to the next preceding decennial census. (Acts and 
Resolves of Mass., 1856, Chap. 2Si, Sec. o.) 

But this did not meet the difficulty, even for the courts of insol- 
vency, to which alone it applied. The Judge must still be present 
to attend to his Probate business. 

When he was unable, by reason of sickness, absence or other 
cause, to perform his insolvency business, or was interested, the 
only judge who could take bis place in the Court of Insolvency was 
the judge of that adjoining county having the least number of 
inhabitants, or in Dukes county or Nantucket by the judge of 
Barnstable County. 

A plan was devised by William A. Richardson, last Judge of 
Probate, and the first Judge of Probate and Insolvency for the 
county of Middlesex, by which the judges might interchange services 
and perform each other's duties, according to their mutual conveni- 
ences and arrangements, thus making the Probate Court and the 
Court of Insolvency, to a greater extent, impersonal courts, one of 
the most important distinguishing features of courts of record. 

This released the judges from being kept for life to their re- 
spective counties and enabled them to take vacations, with journeys, 
for health or recreation, to Europe or elsewhere, and provided for 
cases of long continued illness without worry and annoyance to 
themselves, and without disarranging or disturbing the business 
of the people. During the more than twenty-five years since that 
provisiou was enacted few of the judges have not felt and appre- 
ciated its great benefits. 

It required considerable effort to secure the passage of an act to 
make the change. Judge Richardson drafted a Bill for carrying 
the plan into effect, and his friend and class-mate, Hon. John W. 
Bacon, then a senator from Middlesex county, introduced it into 
the Senate, where it passed exactly as drafted with the omission of 
an immaterial repeal section. "When the Bill reached the House of 
X Representatives some opposition; was encountered. The allowing of 



18D. r >.] The Snow Genealogy. 71 

judges, vvlio had always been regarded as holding personal courts 
in their own names, to interchange services and perform each other's 
duties at pleasure, seeined so novel that many representatives at, first 
Could not agree to it. The Committee of Probate and Chancery 
reported it in a new draft, which was nothing more than the exact 
provisions of the fifth section of the act of 1856, establishing the 
courts of Insolvency above quoted, limiting the holding of courts in 
any county in the case of absence, &c, to tin; judge of that county 
having the least number of inhabitants. The new draft was re- 
jected by the Senate and its own Bill adhered to. On return to 
the House the doubting members having been induced by further 
consideration and explanation to withdraw their opposition, the Bill 
passed and became a law. This legistation was combined in the 
General Statutes with the pre-existing provisions on the same sub- 
ject, as it now stands in the Public Statutes, Chapter 158, Sees. 
3 and 1. 

While the Bill was in preparation and during its passage, Judge 
Richardson was earnest in devising the plan and zealous in securing 
its adoption by the Legislature. To Judge Richardson the people 
of Massachusetts are greatly indebted for its Probate system — for the 
simplicity and efficiency of its forms ami proceedings, and for the 
enlarged jurisdiction of these Probate Courts which now have 
exclusive original jurisdiction in almost all questions arising in the 
settlement of estates. 

For the past twenty years Judge Richardson has been a Judge 
of the Court of Claims, and has done much to extend the jurisdic- 
tion and increase the usefulness of the distinguished Court, and is 
at present its Chief Justice. 



THE SNOW GENEALOGY. 

By Mrs. Chakles L. Alden, of Troy, N. Y. 
[Continued from vol. xliil., page 190.] 

15. Thomas 3 Snow (Mark? Nicliolac 1 ), son of Mark and Jane (Prence) 
Snow, horn in Easfcham, August G, 1668, and died after 1732, for 
in that year his son Thomas Snow, Jr., is spoken of. lie married 
first, Hannah Sears, daughter or Lieut. Silas and Anna Seal's; she 
was horn in Eastham, Decetnher, 1G72, and died before September 
30, 170G, when he married his second wife, Lydia (Sears) Ilamblin. 
She was daughter of Paul and Deborah (Willard) Sears. She was 
born in Yarmouth, October 24, 1GGG, and married first, Eleazur 
Ilamblin, son of James Ilamblin, 2d, of Harwich, born April 12, 
1GG8. They had one child Elisha, born January 26, 1G97-8, mar- 



A\). 


n. 




iv. 




v. 


50. 


vi. 


51. 


vii. 


52. 


viii 




ix. 



Trie Snoiv Genealor/i/, [Jan. 

ried Elizabeth Mayo. Lydia outlived her husband Thomas Snow, 
and died early in the year 1748. We find no will or settlement of 
estate, and we can not give many particulars in regard to the first 
wife's children. kk Hannah Snow, wife of Thomas Snow, admitted 
to Harwich Church June 1"), 1701," and her son Khenezer was the 
first child baptized, March ;}0, 1701. " Lydia Snow was admitted 
to the Church July 7, 1707." Children, by the first wife: 

Elizabeth, 4 -!), in Eastham, Oct. 25-0, 1G03. Perhaps married her 

cousin Josiali 3 Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), Oct. 20, 1719. 
Mary, b. in Harwich, May 1(5, 1696; 
Josiah, b. in Harwich, Jan. 27, 1699. 
Ebenbzku, b. in Harwich, Feb. 14, 1700. 
Hannah, b. in Harwich, March 21, 1702-3. 

By second wife : 

Lydia, b. in Harwich, July 24, 1707. 

Thomas, b. in Harwich, June 15, 1709. 

Aabon, b. in Harwich, Feb. 15, 1710-11. 

Ruth, b. in Harwich, Feb. 23, 1712-13; d. July 15, 1717. 

Harwich was incorporated 1694; began to be settled by settlers 
from Plymouth and Eastham as early as 1G47. I would like further 
particulars in regard to this family. 

1G. Lt. Prence 8 Snow (Mirk, 2 Nicholas 1 ), son of Mark and Jane 
(Pre nee) Snow, born in Eastham, May 22, 1G74; died in Harwich, 
July 7, 1712. He was selectman thirteen years. lie married 

Hannah , ''whose father gave her land in Mansfield, Conn." 

Lt. Pieiice Snow, in his will, speaks of kt Beloved wife Hannah & 
she is to have the laud her father gave her in Mansfield, Conn. 
His daughter Mary Burgess to have half the lot I bought of brother 
INieholas Snow. To granddaughter Hannah JSnow, daughter of 
Samuel Snow, dee'd. To grandson Mark Snow — son of son Jabez 
— my gun. To grandson Prence Snow * * * he to pay to grand- 
daughter Mary Snow &c. To son Jabez. To son Jonathan." 
Samuel Snow, his son, died in 1730, and his father was made 
guardian of his daughter Hannah, which guardianship after the 
death of Prence Snow, Sen., was transferred to his son Jabez. lie 
was lieutenant, in militia. He contributed £G towards building the 
church at Harwich. They had, all born at Harwich: 

Jabez, 4 b. Nov. 7, 1699. 

Hannah, b. Nov. 29, 1701; probably d. uum. before 1742. 

Samuel, b. Dec. 16, 1703. 

Mehcy, b. Nov. 18, 1705; d. June 29, 1736. Published in Harwich, 
July 16, 1735, to Benjamin Sears, son of Samuel and Sarah (Mayo) 
Sears. He was b. in Harwich, Mass., June 16, 1706, m. in 1731, 
1st, Lydia Ryder of Yarmouth, who d. 1733-4 ; m. 2d, Mercy Snow, 
who d. in 31st year of her age. See gravestone in Brewster. She 
had son lleman* Sears, b. Harwich, June 18, 1736, bapt. June 20 
and d. Aug. 15, 1737. Benjamin Sears in. 3d, Abigail (Burgess) 
Sears. 

Prence, b. Oct. 15, 1703 (certainly a mistake, probably 1707). 

Jonathan, ) , ^ 22 1709 ])avid pro bably d. uum. before 1742. 
David, f . ' l J 

Mary, b. Sept. 10, 1712. 

For all Scars items I am indebted to Sears Gen., S. P. May. 



53. 


i. 




ii. 


54. 


iii 




iv 



55. 


v. 


56. 


vi. 


57. 


v i i . 
v i i i 















- 




































1895.] Notes and Queries, 73 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 

Notes. 

Oapt. Tiios. Hobby's Company No. 6 cf the Second Regiment of Connec- 
ticut. — 





» 


Sei 


ved 




Entered Service. 


Discharged. 


weeks. 


duys. 


Sums due. 


Apr. 10, 1761 


Elisha Tor ry Dec. 7, 1701 


34 


4 


17 5 8 1 


" 12, 17G1 


Abel Sherwood Sept. 28, 1701 


24 


2 


12 5 10 1 


" 11, 17(11 


Andrew Sherwood Sept. 2!), 1701 


24 


4 


12 5 8 1 


" 8, 17G1 


Nemiab Sherwood Dee. 7, 1701 


34 


G 


17 8 G i 



The above Abel Sherwood, b. Dee. 20, 1720, son of David (Isaac, Thomas) 
and Sarah (Meeker) Sherwood, died in the army between April 15 and Novem- 
ber, 1701, leaving issue Elijah, Abel, Hannah, Jernsha and Polly, and a widow 
Hannah, who before Feb. 12, 1702, married the above Elisha Terry, by whom 
she had Chloe, Milla, John, Amy and Anna. 

The above company was mustered at llorseneck, in May, 1701, and consisted 
of 100 effective men.' 

The above Elisha Terry served in Bcardsley's Company from Jan. 7, 1777 to 
April 5, 1781; and residence was North 1 airfield, lie Mas paid Jan. 1, 1781 to 
April 5, 1,781. lie was considered too old for active Service, and so was placed 
on guard duty. William A. E. Thomas. 

Trinity College, Hartford, Ct. 



Joy. — P. A. True of Salisbury, Mass., has found among the papers of the 
late Samuel Blaisdell Joy, a power ol* attorney executed, May 27, 1740, before 
Caleb Gushing, Jr., J. P., by which Samuel Joy of Salisbury, yeoman, consti- 
tutes his son Benjamin Joy, also of Salisbury, to be his true and lawful attorney 
to take possession of tin; lands in Ilingham, Mass., "which were granted or 
laid out to my Grandfather Mr. Thomas .Joy late of said Ilingham, Dec'd." 
The executor of this paper was doubtless Samuel, 3 son of that Samuel 2 of Bos- 
ton whose widow Ann (Pitts) married Benjamin Eastman of Salisbury in 1078, 
when Samuel, 3 her only child by the first marriage, was .but seven years old. 
This Samuel 3 was the ancestor of the Joys of Salisbury and Amesbnry, and 
also of the Joys of Southeastern New Hampshire (Durham, Newmarket, Ports- 
month, New Durham and Madbury). James Uiciiabd Joy. 

I'lninndd, N. J. 



Queries. 

Sxow, &c— Who were the parents of Sarah Smith who married, 15 Dec. 1090, 
Joseph 3 Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 )? He died in 1704-5. Did she marry again? 
('an any one give the births and deaths and marriages of their children? Ben- 
jamin 3 Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), born 1G73, married Thankful Borcman, June 
10', 1700. Who were her parents? When and where was she born and where 
did she die? They had Elizabeth, Thomas, James, Seth, Benjamin, Betty Match, 
Mary Pepper, Susannah Smith, llebecca Snow, Jane Snow, Thankful Pitts. 
When were they born and whom did they marry, and what families did they 
have? Sarah Snow 3 (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), born 1077, married 10'J'J, Benjamin 
Young, and had Thankful 1700, John 1702, Daniel 1704. Were there any more? 
1 would like further particulars whom they married, ami their families. Ruth' 
Snow 3 (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), born 1070, married James Brown 1701, and had 
Joseph. Jesse, Zilpha, lluth, Jane, James, George, Rebecca, Benjamin. All 
these in Kiisthnm. I would like dates and further particulars as above. Who 
were the parents of James Brown? Stephen 3 Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), mar- 
ried 1705, Margaret Elkins, and had Margaret, Stephen, Lyclia, Sarah, Elkins, 
Jane, Robert, John, Mercy, Ruth. When were these born, whom did they 
marry and what families did they have? Lydia Snow 3 (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ) 
VQL. XL IX. 7* 



74 Notes and Queries. [Jan. 

married 1714, " James L'mkhorncw " (afterwards called Lincoln), and had James 
1710, Lydia 1718. Were there any others and what Avas their history? James 3 
Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), executor of his father's will 1717. Is there nothing 
more of him? Jane 3 or Mary 3 Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ) married a Hamilton 
and had at least Rebecca before 1717. Who was he, who were his parents and 
what family did they have? 

Who were the parents of Tryphena Austin? Married Eliphalet Spencer of 
Suflield, Ct., and lived in Great Barrington, Mass.; parents, among others, of 
the prominent 'lawyer, Hon. Joshua Austin Spencer. Family tradition says 
Tryphena was daughter of Joshua Austin. If so, who was her mother and their 
parents? 

Who were the parents of Benjamin Clough? Served in Revolutionary war, 
tradition says from Hampshire Co., Mass. He had a son Setli and a son Reuben 
married Docia Parks of " a Massachusetts family." They went to New York 
State and settled first in Homer. He was a member of the " Washington Be- 
nevolent Society." I would like to know more of this Society. 

Who were the parents of Hannah Beckwith who married George Chappell 
near 1744. They had a daughter Ruth, married Simeon Taylor. What was the 
attitude of this Chappell family towards the Revolution, friendly or otherwise? 

Just where is Joseph 2 Alden (John 1 ) buried? Will no one try and find it and 
copy the inscription? How many daughters had he, and who were they? He 
mentions none of them in his will, but this was not unusual. Nicholas Snow r , 
Mark Snow and others only speak of their sons, but Mitchell, in his History of 
Bridge-water, gives hi in two. I am inclined to think Sarah who married Joseph 
Grossman, and possibly Mercy who married John Burrill of Weymouth and 
Abington, were his daughters, though Mercy may belong to David. When 
Jonathan 2 Alden (John 1 ) died he left no will, but his estate was divided into seven 
parts, Two parts to John, eldest sor ; and three sons and three daughters are 
spoken of. I have just found a deed acknowledging that they had received 
their share Of their lather's estate, to John from Andrew, Jonathan, Sarah wife 
of Thomas Southworth, and Elizabeth wife of Edmund Chandler. Where was 
the third daughter? Was she dead? The descendants of this Sarah have sup- 
posed her daughter of David. See Supplement Alden Memorial. Who was 
this Edmund Chandler? Mrs. Charles L. Alden. 

■1 Gale Place, Troy, X. Y. 



Mai/ihy, Perry, Fountain, Ciiask and Bakkr. — 

1. Joseph Maltby was born about 1300, in Leeds, England; m. June 9, 1830, 
by Noah Levings, in the old Sands St. Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., to Betsey Gold- 
smith Chase (b. Oct. 1805, in Danbury, Ct.), dan. of Obadiah and Amy or Ru- 
hamah (Terry) Chase. Mr. Wm. Hirst of Leeds was the witness. This Joseph, 
about 1S32, went to Baltimore, Md., and then started to visit his brother Wil- 
liam in Tennessee. Any information regarding this Joseph and his ancestors 
will be thankfully received. Also any information as to when and where he 
died will be thankfully received. 

2. Can any one tell me who was the first husband of Ruhamah or Amy 
Perry, daughter of Elisha and Hannah (Fountain) Perry? She had a daughter by 
this marriage named Harriet, who was adopted by her second husband, Obadiah 
Chase. Ruhamah d. April 13, 1802, in New York City, aged 88 yrs. mos. 25 
days, and she is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N. Y., with her 
daughter Mrs. Betsey Goldsmith Maltby, who died Oct. 10, 1870, in Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

3. The following entries appear on the Church Records of Fairfield, Ct. : 
Hannah, Fountain bap. May, 29, 10i)8 

Samuel son to Aaron Fountain bap. May, 20, 1008. 

Aaron & Moses sons to Aaron Fountain bap. June 5, 1098. 

Hannah dau. to Aaron Fountain bap. June 5, 1098. 

Aaron Fountain bap. May, 20, 1700 

Aaron Fountain bap. May, 2, 1702 

Hannah Fountain wife of Aaron Fountain admitted into full communion May, 
20, 1098 

This was during the ministry of Joseph Webb. 

Can any one state if the above Aaron was the same person, or the son of the 
person, who was in New London in 1083? 



. 












. 












. 















1895.] JSFotes and Queries. 75 

On the Fairfteld Land Records there is further mention of a John and a Wil- 
liam as sons of Aaron. 

Any information concerning what became of the above family will be thank- 
fully received. 

4. Francis Baker, b. 1G11 ; m. 1(511, Isabel, dan. of William Twining. Was 
she the daughter of William and Annie (Doaue) Twining, or of William and 
Elizabeth (Deanc) Twining? 

5. Page 521, Voi. II. Bolton's Westchester, 1848, says that Isaac Chase m. 
Mary 4 Holmes, dan. of Jonathan 3 (Jonathan, 2 David 1 of Bedford, 1710) and 
Dorothy Holmes. Can any one tell me if this Isaac was the son of Isaac Chase, 
and if he had Obadiah, Hannah, Isaac, Phebe, Mary, Sarah and John? 

0. Can any one tell me "who the following married and where they were born? 
Isaac* Chase, b. March 28, 1714. 
Isaac" Chase, b, Oct. 20, 1750. 

The line of the above runs William, 1 William, 2 John, 3 Isaac, 4 Isaac,* Isaac, 6 
Obadiah who was dead July 1, 1811). 

7. Elizabeth , in. between 1720-1720, Aaron Fountain. Can any one 

tell me who she was? 

8. Can any one state who the following married? They were the issue of 
Elisha and Hannah (Fountain) Perry: Milla or Millicent, John, Chloe, Ann. 
They lived somewhere near Danbury, Conn. Ann m. 1st, Nov. 20, 17%, Lieut. 
James, 5 son of James 4 and Mary (Norton) Lockwood. The name of her second 
husband is especially desired. William A. E. Thomas. 

Trinity College, Hartford, Ct. 



Murray. — Information of any kind regarding the following persons is desired. 

Joseph Murray married Hannah Pattison, April 10, 1724. Children: Eliza- 
beth, b. Jan. 24, 1725; James, b. May 19, 1727; John, b. July 2, 1729; Mary, b. 
Oct. 2, 1731; Elisha, b. March 19, 1734; Hannah, b. July 27, 1730; Ruba, b. 
March 12, 1739; Parthena, b. June 7, 1H1 ; Joseph, Jr., b. Feb. 27, 1744, d. 
Jan. 18, 1815; Philemon, b. Aug. 2, 1740; Eunice, b. July 10, 1749. 

Joseph Murray, Jr. married Isabella Burntt. Children: Andrew, b. Ancr. 8, 
1770, d. March 18, 1853; Lucy, b. Feb. 8, 1772; John N., b. Nov. 5, 1773; Sally, 
b. May 28, 1775; Harriet, b. Dec. 2, 1770; Anna, b. May 19, 1778; Betsy, b. 
May IK, 1780. 

Andrew Murray, son of Joseph, Jr., married Polly Bartlctt, daughter of 
Iclmbod Uurliett and A/.uba Norton. They married and lived in Addison, Vt. 

120 Jvftilemon X(., Drvokti/n, A'. Y. Ahcuihald Murray, M.D. 



Parkntagk ov Mary and Suzanna Knowles. Information wanted. — The 
former, b. In 1705, d. August 11, 1792, and is buried at Brooklyn, Conn. She 
married Francois Crestir Le Roy, a " French gentleman," about 1780, and had 
issue: Mary Frances-Loquare-2dly Consolye; Suzannah Knowles-Metz ; Har- 
riet-Donnelly ; Francis Cu-sar, d.s.j)., and his twin sister Terese Mary Charlotte- 

de lloule. Monsieur Le Roy married 2dly, Eunice, daughter of Monlton 

of , Mass. or Stafford, Conn., by whom there were seven daughters and 

three sons, some of whom were born at Sawpitts, Ct. , now East Chester, N. Y., 
and others in New York City. 

A grand-daughter, Caescrine Metz, married a cousin, Charles Monlton, banker 
of New York and Paris, and their daughter Helen is the wife of Count Paul von 
Ilatzfeld, German Embassador at the British Court, by whom there are Helen- 
to Prince Maximillian llohenlohe-Oehringcn ; Mary-to his brother Prince Fred- 
crick; and Herman, unmarried. 

Suzanna Knowles, b. 17434, d. at Bristol, Ct., May 10, 1842; m. Vine, son of 
Paul Holt, 6 and his wife Sarah Welch, b. Feb. 20, 1770, at Hampton,— moved to 
Bristol, Conn., and died while temporarily absent at Willington, Ct., April 9, 
1828. As their eldest child, Josiah, and their second, Mary Scovill, were bap- 
tized at Brooklyn, Conn., in 1790 and in 1797 respectively, and their youngest, 
Ziba, at Bristol, Ct. in 1800, it Is probable that they were married at or in the 
vicinity of the former place, but imperfect records fail to disclose such as a fact. 

It is surmised that Suzanna and Mary were children of Captain Charles 
Knowles, who served during the Revolutionary war. He entered service as 
quartermaster of the Second Connecticut (Spencer's) regiment, May 9th, and 
I 









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76 JSTotes and Queries. [Jan. 

served until Dec. 10, 1775. The regiment was raised at or from the vicinity of 
Micl'dleto.wn, Connecticut, but Captain Knowles's place of birth or residence was 
not recorded on the regimental muster rolls. Subsequently he served in Knox's 
and Crane's regiments of Continental Artillery (Massachusetts), from Sept. 
1770 to 1781, and later was transferred to the Corps of Artillery, and continued 

in service until Nov. 3, 1783. (Died , 179G), but all efforts to discover 

where he was born, where died, or where buried, have been fruitless so far. 

Any information to throw light on these points will prove invaluable towards 
perfecting the pedigrees of the descendants of the Knowles-Le Roy and Moul- 
ton-Le Roy marriages, and will be gratefully acknowledged by 

5S Cedar Street, 'Chicago, III. B. J. D. Irwin, U. S. A. 



Kent. — In Dwight's Genealogy the statement is made that " Col. Elihti Kent, 
born Dec. 15; 1757, went with his father [Major Elilm Kent] into the revolutionary 
army and was captured on Long Island by the enemy, and confined for a long 
time as a prisoner of war in the old Sugar House in New York, where he suf- 
fered greatly. He was a farmer at Sullield and kept a public house. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Filch of Lebanon, Conn." 

The above statement as to the birth and marriage of Col. Elilm Kent is en- 
tirely accurate. In the " Recorde of Connecticut men in the war of the Revo- 
lution," however, no mention of Col. Kent's service is made, though the service 
of his father, Major LTihu Kent, is recorded. Can anyone give the authority 
for the statement in Dwight? (Miss) Emma C. King. 

" The Kingdom," Acuta, Ohio. 



Josi.vu Wood. — Information concerning the relatives of Josiah Wood who 
went to Dorchester, New Brunswick, about 17!)0 to 1800. His father's name 
was Josiah Wood, and his mother's maiden name was Ruth Thompson. He 
had a brother Charles, a sister Eunice who married a clergyman, and two other 
sisters names not known. His mother, Ruth Thompson, was a daughter of 
Robert Thompson. Robert Thompson had a grant of lands in Nova Scotia, and 
his family (so far as known) consisted of a son Robert and three daughters, 
Desire, Ruth and Martha. Martha married Eaton Murray. The families are 
believed to have lived in Connecticut, probably in New Haven or neighborhood. 

Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. Josiah Wood. 

James Jerauld, a Huguenot physician, came to this country and Anally set- 
tled in Mi'diield, Mass., the town reeords of which give the names and birth 
date of all his known children but one. When did he arrive in America? 
Where did he first settle, ami where and when was his first child James born? 
His wife was Martha Dupee. When and where (.lid he marry her? Address 
Rev. S. L. Geiiould, Holds, N. H. 



Siiepaud. — Proof wanted of the covrectness of Savage's statement, that 
Thomas Shepard of Maiden, Avho married, Nov. 19, 1G5S, Hannah Ensign of 
Scituate, was probably, or Wyinan's positively, son of Ralph Shepard of Wey- 
mouth, &.c, who died Sept. 11, 1093, aged 90, and is buried in Maiden. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. Lucius M. Boltwood. 



Nkw ton. — Information is desired concerning the ancestry and military record 
of John Newton Whom tradition locates in Roxbury, Mass., Ellington, Conn, or 
Stafford Springs, Conn. His wife was Ruth Bradley; one of his daughters was 
Hannah, who married for her second husband, Oct. 13, 1810, John Bowker King 
of Sullield, Conn. Hannah (Newton) King died Aug. 8, 1872. 

" The Kingdom," Xenia, Ohio. (Miss) Emma C. King. 



CnuiUUi.- Can any one give me the date and place of birth, parentage and 
marriage of Simeon Church who died in Chester, Conn., Oct. 7, 1702, in 81th 
year; ;ind of Jonathan and Samuel Church, early settlers of Granville, Mass.? 

tlmnd Rapids, Midi. Lucius M. Boltwood. 















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1895.] Notes and Queries. 77 

Ghkkn. — Who can give roe the birth place, parentage, early residence and 
birth of children of Timothy Green, born Aug. '.), 1723, who married Eunice 
KllsworUi, born March 21), 1717, and died in Amherst, Mass., Nov. 1, 17!)(>, a. 
73? It is only known that he had a son Timothy, born .Ian. 4, 1718, who died 
in Amherst, Mass. 1 , Sept. 7, 1821* a. 73. Lucius M. Boltwood. 

Grand Jiapids, Micji. 



DICKINSON. — Wanted, the date and place of birth and parentage of Esther 
Fowler, who married, Jan. 15, 1701, Nathan Dickinson of Amherst, Mass., and 
there died March 1."), 1803, a. G3. Lucius M. Boltwood. 

Grand Itapids, Mich. 



Pjxlky. — Information wanted of descendants from Isaac Pixley, who died 
at Great Harrington, Mass., about 1791, leaving several children. His house at 
Great Harrington was burned in 1788. E. Hooker. 

289 Gates Ave. Brooklyn, if. Y. 



Barnes. — Correspondence is solicited from the descendants of Timothy Barnes 
or JJams } who Avas born iu 1741, at Hartford, Conn., and died in 1825, at Litch- 
field, in the same state. His wife's name was Eunice Munson. 

Shej)ield, Pa. Bykon Barnes Horton. 



Richauoson-Clark. — Asa Richardson and his wife Lucy Clark lived at Nor- 
wich, Conn., about the time of the Revolution, and later (perhaps about 1800) 
moved to Vermont, and settled at Montpelier with their children. Asa Richard- 
son had been a soldier in the Revolution in a Connecticut regiment. I should 
be glad to learn who were the parents, etc., of the above-named. 

SO Washington Square, New York, iV. Y. S. Sherwood. 



Clay. — Information is desired of the parentage and birthplace of Captain 
James Clay who married at Rehoboth, Mass., i) February, 1744, Lydia Walker, 
and represented that town in the General Court of Massachusetts, 17G3-17G1). 
He was later of Putney, Vermont, where he died 3 August, 1798. 

Too Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. J. Granville Leach. 



Catiiaimne Ransom. —Can anyone supply the ancestry of Catharine Ransom 
who married in 1735 Samuel Lord, born 1705, son of Thomas and Mary (Lee) 
Lord of Lyme, Conn. GEORGE E. Maltjjy. 

Xcw 1 la ccn, Conn. 



Replies. 

bit. Ezkiciel Dodge Gushing. — In looking over an article by Ebenezer Aldeu 
upon Dr. Lzekiel Dodge Gushing, that appears on page 180 of the Register for 
April, 18-17, I find it stated that John Cushing, born in 1(527, son of Mathew, 
married Sarah, daughter of Nicholas Jacob. I am very sure that this is an 
error, as by my record of the Cushings I find that John Cushing married Sarah, 
a daughter of Mathew Hawke, and that it was his brother Mathew who mar- 
ried Sarah, a daughter of Nicholas Jacob. 

Thinking this error might perhaps mislead parties who read the article, and 
were in search of some genealogical fact, I have taken the liberty to correct the 
error. L. B. Cushing. 

Xeioburyport, Mass. 



Historical Intelligence. 

Genealogies in Preparation. — Persons of the several names are advised to 

furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 

and other information which they think may be useful. We would suggest that 

all facts of interest illustrating family history or character be communicated, 












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78 /Societies and their Proceedings. [Jan. 

especially service under the U. S. Government, the holding of other offices, 
graduation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and 
dales of births, marriages, residence and death. When there are more than one 
christian name they should all be given in full if possible. No initials should 
be used when the 1 full names are known. 

Bangs, — The History and Genealogy of the Bangs Family is being compiled 
by Dean Dudley, Esq., of Montrose, Middlesex County, Mass. This notice has 
been published in the IIegisteii before, as Mr. Dudley is a family historian of 
long experience, and has been gathering material for the Bangs family book 
ever since 1849. 

lie inserted a tabular pedigree in the Register, vol. viii., page 309, and an- 
other genealogical article of the Bangses in vol. x., pp. 157-9. This work will 
be well illustrated and bound in one volume. 

Jinnies. — The descendants of Timothy Barnes, or Barns, of Connecticut are 
requested to correspond with Byron Barnes Ilorton, Sheffield, Pa. 

Cleveland of Cleaveiand.— Edmund J. Cleveland, Hartford, Ct., has now ready 
for the press a genealogy of this family. The work is the result of years of 
labor, and a large outlay of money. It will be printed, when enough sub- 
scribers to defray the expense are obtained, in two volumes, illustrated with 
portraits, and the edition will be limited to six hundred copies. The work 
will make about 2000 pages, printed on line paper, large octavo, and will be 
handsomely bound in cloth, gilt top, and will be furnished to subscribers 
at $15 a set. Subscriptions should be addressed to Edmund J. Cleveland, 43 
Beacon St., Hartford, Ct. 

Livingston. — The Rev. William Farrand Livingston, 187 State Street, Augusta, 
Maine, is preparing a history and genealogy of the Livingston family in America. 
Any information relating to the ancestry of the family and descendants, both 
living and dead, will be gratefully received. Correspondence is solicited from 
all persons interested, and those able to furnish material are requested to for- 
ward names, dates and other facts to Mr. Livingston for incorporation in the 
volume. 

Mason. — A genealogy of the descendants of Major John Mason, first deputy 
governor of Connecticut, is in preparation. Communication from members of 
the family is desired. L. B. Mason, 00 Lexington Ave., New York City. 

Munson. — The Munson Record, a family history, was begun in 1882, and since 
then, excepting about two years, it has been the one employment of the his- 
torian, Kt'v. Myron A. Munson. A prospectus has been issued by the Committee 
on Publication, of which Richard II. Greene of New York is chairman, for 
publishing the work by subscription. It is estimated that the work will make 
about 1250 pages. The work will be handsomely printed and illustrated. It 
will make two volumes, and the subscription price will be $10 in cloth, or §9 
in paper. Subscriptions received by the treasurer, .Tared II. Munson, secretary 
of the committee, No. GO Broadway, New York City, who will send applicants 
a detailed circular. 

Street; — Mrs. Mary A. Street, Exeter, N. II., corresponding secretary of the 
Street Family Association of England and America, has compiled for the asso- 
ciation a genealogy of this family which is ready to put into the printer's hands. 
The book will make 500 pages, including the index. Mrs. Street will send cir- 
culars to applicants. 



SOCIETIES AND THEIR PROCEEDINGS. 
Neav-England Historic Genealogical Society. 

Boston, Massachusetts, Wednesday, October 3, 1S04. — A stated meeting was 
held this afternoon at three o'clock, in the hall of the Boston University, 12 
Somerset sireet. In the absence of President Claflin, Hon. Peleg Emory Aldrich, 
LL.D., was chosen president pro tern. 









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18#5.] Societies and their Proceedings. 79 

Edwin D. Meact, editor of the New England Magazine, read a paper on •' New 
England and the English Commonwealth." Remarks were made by Rev. Anson 
Titus. Seven resident and one corresponding members were elected. Reports 
of the Council were read by the secretary, Geo. A. Gordon. 

John Ward Dean, the librarian-, reported that I volumes and 84 pamphlets 
had been presented to the Society since the last meeting. 

Rev! K. 11. Byliigtpn, D.D., the historiographer, reported the deaths of four- 
teen members, namely, ira J. Patch, of Salem, who died June 7 ; Charles A. 
Greene', M.D., of Arlington, who died June 15, aged 70; Rev. John Cordner, 
D.D., of Boston, died .June 22, aged 78; David Eulsifer, A.M., died at Augusta, 
Me.', 'Aug. '.', iv. 02; Joseph Burnett, of Southboro', died Atfg : . 11, aged 74; 
Matthew A. Stickuey, of Salem, died Aug, 12, aged 89; James VV. Converse, of 
Boston, who died Aug. 2(5, aged 86; Willhim Edward Collin, of Boston, who 
died Aug. 27, aged 82; Daniel Kavenel, of Charleston, S. C, who died Sept. 4, 
aged GO; Elisha C. Leonard, of New Bedford, who died Sept. 7, aged 75; lion. 
Ariel S. Thurston, of Elinira, N. Y., who died Sept. 23, aged 84; Samuel II. 
(iookin, of Boston, who died Sept. 23, aged 74; Frederick D. Allen, of Boston, 
who died Sept. 28, aged 86: Rev. Grindall Reynolds, D.D., of Concord, who 
died Sept. 30, aged 72. 

November 7. — A stated meeting was held at 12 Somerset street, at 3 o'clock, 
P.M. 'The Rev. Edmund F. Shifter, D.I)., was chosen to preside. 

William R. Thayer, A.M., editor of the Harvard Graduates Magazine, read a 
paper on "'John Harvard and the Founding of Harvard College." Remarks 
from Rev. 10. II. Hyington, \).\)., followed. 

The report of the Council was read by the secretary. 

Eight resident members were elected. 

The librarian reported the receipt of 20 volumes and 21 pamphlets as donations. 

The historiographer reported the death of three members, namely, James 
Anthony Kroude, LL.D., of England, who died Oct. 20, aged 76 ; Peter Thacher, 
A.M., of Newton, who died Oct. 21, aged 84 ; Samuel II. Russell, of Boston, 
who died Oct. 24, aged 71. 

X)e.cemher o. — A stated meeting was held at three o'clock this afternoon. Col. 
Ebt-n I 1 '. Stone was chosen president -pro tem. 

Clnii'les S. Ensign, LL.B., read a paper on " Jonathan Gilbert, the grandfather 
of Gov. Jonathan Belcher." Remarks were made by George Ivuhn Clarke, LL.B. 

Il<>n. Alexander II. Rice, LL.D., offered resolutions on the death of lion. 
Robert ('. NYinthrop, which he introduced with some remarks, which are 
puMLhed in full in the Huston Transcript, Dec. 7. The resolutions were unani- 
mously adapted by a rising vote. 

Ten resident members were elected. 

A nominating committee, consisting of George S. Mann, Ihornas Weston, 
A.M., Aaron Sargent, Warren 1>. Ellis and Charles E. Mason were elected by 
ballot. Au»ttn .1. Coolldge and Henry E. Woods were appointed a committee 
to audit the treasurer's account. 

William S. Stevens, M.D., the corresponding secretary, made his report. 

The librarian reported that II volumes and -57 pamphlets had been presented 
during the last month. 

The historiographer reported the death of one member, lion. Robert C. Win- 
tliroj), LL.D., of Boston, who died Nov. 16, aged 85. 

Old Colony Historical Society. 

Taunton, Mass., Tuesday, July 31, 1804.-— A quarterly meeting was held in 
Historical Hall this evening, the president, Rev. S. Hopkins Emery, D.D., in 
the cluii r. 

Fourteen members were elected. 

Mr. Edward W. Porter, the historiographer, reported the deaths of three 
members, namely, Henry Hay lies, who died at Maiden, Dec. 15, 1803, aged 71 ; 
Capt. William Mason Hale of Taunton, who died July 2, 1801, in his 72d year; 
and Alfred Wood Raid of Dightou, died July 2:5, 1894, in his 72d year. 

Capt. John W. D. Hall, tin; librarian, reported the quarterly donations. 

Friday, Oct. 25. — A quarterly meeting was held this evening, President Emery 
in the chair. 

The president made a brief address. 



80 Societies and their Proceedings. [Jan. 

The historiographer read memorials of Horatio Leonard Cushman, who died 
Sept. 12, and of Messrs. Mason and Paul, whose deaths were reported in July. 
The secretary read a notice of Mr. Baylies; Leonard 15. Ellis read a biographi- 
cal sketch of Elisha Clarke Leonard of New Bedford, who died Sept. 7, in his 
75th year; and the president read notices of Mrs. Delight Carpenter Reed, who 
died May 11, in her 66th year, and Mrs. Eleanor Sherbourne, who died June 10, 
in her 78th year. 

Resolutions were passed on the deaths of Messrs. Leonard and Cushman, two 
of the trustees of the Society. 

Ten members were elected, and a nominating committee was appointed. 

The librarian made his report of donations received during the last quarter. 

Maine Historical Society. 

Portland, Thursday, September 6, 1894. — This Society enjoyed its annual 
Field Day excursion by a trip to Pemaquid, by invitation of the Lincoln County 
Historical Society. 

The morning train from Portland brought a large number of members of the 
Society, and additions to the party were made at Wiscasset and Newcastle. At 
the latter place carriages were in waiting, and soon after ten o'clock the long 
procession started for Pemaquid. After a ride of fifteen miles the party reached 
Pemaquid at about noon. At the Jamestown Hotel a most excellent dinner was 
provided by the Lincoln County Historical Society. After dinner an oppor- 
tunity was given for inspecting the old ruins which are now the property of 
the Pemaquid Monument Association. Much work has been done by way of 
excavation to show the method of construction. At the old fort a platform had 
been built on the top of the great rock in the centre of the corner bastion. 
Here President John M. Glidden of the Lincoln County Society, in a brief 
speech introduced President James P. Baxter of the State Society. Mr. Baxter 
thanked the Lincoln County Society for its hospitality. He read a letter from 
Hon. James W. Bradbury of Augusta, regretting his absence on the occasion. 
Speeches were made by Hon. Rufus K. Sewall, secretary, and Hon. Henry In- 
galls, president of the Pemaquid Monument Association; and by llev. E. C. 
Whitteniore, representing the Lincoln County society. 

The party returned to Newcastle, where a meeting for the reading of papers 
was held the next day, Sept 7th, in the Congregational Church. In the absence 
of President Baxter, (Jen. John Marshall Brown presided. . 

Rev. Dr. Henry S. Barrage, editor of 2 ion's Advocate, Portland, read a paper 
on "The First Mention of Pemaquid in History " ; and Rev. Henry O. Thayer 
one on " The Facts Definitely Known concerning Pemaquid p$ior to 1G25." 

Hiiode Island Historical Society. 

Providence, Tuesday, October 2, 1894. — A quarterly meeting was held this 
evening, the president, lion. Horatio Rogers, in the chair. 

Ten members were elected. 

The action of the library committee in securing copies of Rhode Island manu- 
scripts in the Archives division of the U. S. Department of State at Washing- 
ton, was rtpp.ro ted j 

The president of the Society, Judge Rogers, commended the publication com- 
mittee for printing copies of two manuscripts having a direct bearing on the 
question why Rhode Island took no part in the Constitutional Convention of 
1787. 

The librarian announced the gift to the Society of a remarkable collection of 
New York and Boston newspapers. 

October 30. — A stated meeting was held this evening, President Rogers in the 
chair. 

Thomas II. Murray, editor of the Lawrence Sun-Ameiican, read a paper en- 
titled " Some Early Irish Members of the Society of Friends in Rhode Island." 

November VS. — A stated meeting was held this evening. 

Rev. Oliver Dyer read a paper on "The Presidential Career of Andrew 
Jackson." 






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1895.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society, 



81 






NECROLOGY OF THE NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC 
, GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Prepared by the Historiographer, Rev. Ez'HA Hoy t Byingtqn, D.D., of Newton, Mass. 

Tuk sketches of deceased members prepared for the Register are of 
necessity brief, because the space that can he appropriated is quite limited. 
All the materials for more extended memoirs which can be gathered are 
preserved in the archives of the Society, and they will be available for use 
in preparing the " Memorial Biographies," of which four volumes have 
been issued and a fifth volume is in press. The income from the Towne 
Memorial Fund is devoted to the publication of these volumes. 

Robert Charles Wintiirop, A.M., LL.D., of Boston, a. Life Member of this 
Society, was born in Boston, May 12, 1809, and died in Boston, November 10, 
1S!M. He was a descendant in the sixth generation from the great Puritan 
Leader, Governor John Winthrop, the true founder of the Colony of Massachu- 
setts Hay. The family of Winthrop was an ancient and honored family in 
England. Groton manor, near Lavenham, came into the possession of Adam 
"Winthrop, the second of the name, in 1518. This manor descended to Governor 
.John Winthrop, who is said to have had an income, when lie left England, 
equivalent in our day to between three and four thousand pounds per annum. 
His son, commonly called "John Winthrop the younger," was one of the most 
accomplished scholars of his time, and for nearly twenty years Governor of 
Connecticut. His son, Chief Justice Whithrop, is spoken of by Judge Sewall 
in his diary as " the great stay anil ornament of the Council, a very pious, pru- 
dent, courageous New England man." His son was an active member of the 
Royal Society, a graduate of Harvard College of 1700. and died near London in 
1717. .John S. Winthrop, of the next generation, was an excellent business man, 
who -Was graduated from Yale College 1737, and died in New London 177(>. 
Lieut. Governor Thomas Lindall Winthrop was born in New London, March 6, 
174*0., graduated from Harvard College in 1780, and died in Boston, Feb. 21, 1811. 
lie Was for six years Lieutenant (Jovernor of Massachusetts, and for many years 
President of the Massachusetts Historical Society. I do not know that we have 
bad in New England so remarkable a family history — such a'suceession of men 
of great ability, for half ;i dozen generations — graduates of Harvard or of Yale; 
n succession which shows us in the sixth generation one of the most eminent 
and accomplished men of his time — the eloquent orator, the statesman of broad 
and comprehensive views, the philanthropist, the man of letters. 

Mr Winthrop entered the Boston Latin School in 1818, and was graduated 
at Harvard College in 1828,. He studied law in the otllcool Daniel Webster, and 
was admitted to the bar in ls;U. In is;'»4 he was chosen a representative to the 
General Court, and four years later was elected Speaker of the House of Repre- 
sentatives. He was a mem her of Congress for ten years from 1810, and in 
18 Is 'J was Speaker. He was defeated as a candidate for Speaker in 1850, by 
two votes, after more than sixty ballotings. The same year he was appointed 
a senator by Gov. Davis to succeed Daniel Webster, lie was an unsuccessful 
candidate for Governor of Massachusetts in 1851, and in 1851 he was chosen 
one of the Presidential Electors. This was the last political otlice which he 
held. 

lie published '/The Life and Letters of John Winthrop," in two volumes, 
and three large volumes of speeches and addresses. These are one hundred 
and eighty in number, covering the period from 1835 to 1871). Among the most 
notable of his public addresses was the oration on the laying of the corner-stone 
of the National Washington Monument in 1818; on the Life and Services of 
James Uowdoin in 1811); the Obligations and Responsibilities of Educated Men, 
before the re-union of Harvard University in 1S52, and the oration at Yorktown 
on the onedmndredth anniversary of the Surrender of Lord Cornwallis. The 
oration on the completion of the Washington monument. A recent privately 
printed volume of reminiscences. In 1815 he made his great speech in Congress 
against the Annexation of Texas, and in 1850 he delivered his last important 
speech in the Senate in opposition to the fugitive-slave law. 

VOL. XLIX. 8 



82 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

Mr. Winthrop was President of the Massachusetts Historical Society for 
thirty years: President of the Peabody Education Fund; a member of the 
American Antiquarian Society, The Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a large 
number of other societies. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from Bowdoin College, and from 
Harvard University', and at a later date from the University of Cambridge. 

Mr. Winthrop was thrice married. Two sons and a daughter by ins first 
marriage survive him. 

At the meeting of tins Society Dec. 5, 1894, the Hon. Alexander II. Rice, LL.D., 
made some remarks on Mr. Winthrop's character, and offered the following 
resolution," which was passed : — 

Resolved, That the New-England Historic, Genealogical Society desires to 
place upon its records its high appreciation of and testimony to the exalted 
character, intellectual endowments and disinterested usefulness of its recent 
member, the Honorable Robert Charles Winthrop, whose long connection with 
this society was one of honor and usefulness; and to express its mournful 
sympathy not only with his surviving relatives, but with the people of Massa- 
chusetts and of the whole country, in the loss of a citizen universally beloved 
and renowned. 

James Anthony Froude, M.A., LL.D., of London, was born in Darlington* 
Devonshire, England, April 23, 1818, and died October 20, 1891. 

Like most other distinguished literary men in England, of this generation, Mr. 
Fronde was very much interested in this country. He made two visits to the 
United States, the one most remembered in 1872, when he made an extended 
lecturing tour. He was a membor of a number of societies in America. He 
was elected a corresponding member of this Society, December 1, 1886, and an 
honorary member October 1, 1890. 

Mr. Froude was the son of a clergyman, Archdeacon Froude, of Totnes, and 
was educated at the Westminster School, and at Oxford, where he took his 
bachelor's degree in 1840, and won the Chancellor's English prize essay in 1842, 
the subject being " The Influence of the Science of Political Economy on the 
Moral and Social Welfare of the Nation." He was elected to a Fellowship in 
1812, and was ordained a deacon in the Established Church in 1844. lie was at 
that time interested in the tractarian movement' at Oxford under Newman, and 
•the other great leaders, and he contributed to its literature in his "Lives of 
ithe Saints." Hut there came a sudden change after a few years, and in 1848 he 
published "Nemesis of Faith," a book which made a stir, «'tud lost its author 
the Fellowship, and a valuable position as an educator, and brought him the 
condemnation of the Church. He had little interest in clerical work at any time, 
but continued "in orders" until 1872, when the passage of the Clerical Disa- 
bilities Act gave him the occasion for a formal renunciation of the ministry. 

For the larger part of his life Mr. Froude. was devoted to literature. Few 
men of his time were more fully equipped than he, and he was able to work with 
great rapidity. He produced a large number of books, some of them of the 
first rank. He made his mark first as a writer for Eraser's Magazine, and his 
brilliant articles were collected in the volumes entitled " Short Studies on Great 
Subjects," which were eagerly read by thoughtful young men twenty-five years 
ago. His Magnum Opus, the " History of England from the fall of Cardinal 
Wolsey to the defeat of the Spanish Armada, a work in twelve volumes, 
•occupied him about fifteen years, to the year 1870. These volumes are especi- 
ally valuable for the minute information which they give of the condition of 
the English people of that period, and for the abundant use. -which he made of 
original documents from the English Archives. They are among the most de- 
lightful histories in our language, although they have not led the readers of 
history to adopt his views in respect to Queen Elizabeth, or to reverse their 
own judgments concerning Henry VIII. A recent critic has said that "Mr. 
F^roude's portrait of the King represented him as an exemplary gentleman who 
had six very bad wives." 

Of his later historical works I should mention his " Divorce of Catharine of 
Arra^on," the "Spanish Story of the Armada," " Becket," "Caesar," "The 
English in Ireland in the Eighteenth Century," and "The Life of Erasmus," 
published just before his death. He was also the author of several volumes of 
a different character, such as " Oceanica," a narrative of his voyage to Austra- 
lia ; the " English in the West Indies," " John Bunyan," "Lord Beaconsficld," 



1805.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 83 

" Reminiscences of Thomas Carlyle," "The First Forty years of the Life of 
Thomas Carlyle," and " Carlyle's Life in London." 

Mr. Fronde deserves to rank among the foremost of the great English his- 
torians of this century, Maeanlay, Stnbbs, Freeman, and Green, all of whom I 
believe have now passed away. His period of authorship extended over ilfty 
years, and the number of his volumes was not much short of sixty. He wrote 
too rapidly to do the best work. He was industrious and enterprising in his 
researches, but he lacked the judicial mind so essential to a historian. He was 
constitutionally a partizan, and his views of the events of history were apt to 
be colored by his personal prejudices. 

He was made the rector of St. Andrew's in 1809; and he was appointed by 
Lord Salisbury Begins Professor of Modern History at Oxford in 1892, after 
the death of Prof. E. H. Freeman, who had succeeded Prof. Stnbbs. Lord 
Bosebery will not find it an easy task to select a man worthy to succeed, in that 
chair, three such historians as Stubbs, Freeman and Fronde. 

Francis Minot Weld, A.M., M.D., of Jamaica Plain, was born in Dalton, 
New Hampshire, January 17, 1840, and died at Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, 
December 31, 1893. He was elected a resident member of this Society, Novem- 
ber G, 1889, the second of the same name on our roll. 

Dr. Weld traced his family line through four generations. His father was 
Thomas Swan Weld, of Dalton, N. II. His grandfather was William Gordon 
Weld. His great-grand-father was Eleazer Weld. And his ancestor of the 
next generation was John Weld. His parents removed from New Hampshire 
to Jamaica Plain while he was a boy. He was prepared for college at the Eliot 
School, and entered at Harvard College in 185G. He was graduated with high 
rank in 18G0. He entered the Medical School and pursued his studies there 
about two years, when he entered the service of the United States as a 
surgeon. He served at the Naval Hospital, Chelsea, and at the Port Hospital, 
Grafton, West Virginia. In January, 18G3, he was assigned to the monitor 
Nantucket. In December he was ordered uo the frigate Wabash. He thought it 
best, however, to resign his commission, and take time to complete his medical 
studies. He was graduated in March, 18G4, and was soon after commissioned 
as a surgeon. He served in General Grant's campaigns of that year. He was 
with General Terry's corps at Fort Fisher, and then joined General Sherman's 
army near Raleigh. He was at different times brigade and diyision surgeon, 
and had charge of various held and port hospitals. 

When he was mustered out of service, September 21, 1865, he returned to 
Jamaica Plain and began the practice of his profession. A year later he en- 
gaged In business in New York. After a time he returned to the practice of 
medicine, and was attending and consulting physician in various hospitals and 
dispensaries. 

In 1872 (April 11) he married Fanny Elizabeth Bartholomew, who survives 
him. They had three children, two sons and a daughter. 

He retired from practice in 18S7 and made his home in Jamaica Plain. He 
was a member of a number of organizations, to which he gave much of his 
time. flu was especially active in the formation of the New York Harvard 
Club, and served as Its president. From 1882 to 1889 he was an overseer of 
Harvard College. He received the degree of M.A. in 1871. 

Samukl Jamics Bhidgk, A.M., of Boston, a resident member of this Society, 
was born in Boston, June 1, 1809, and died at the Norfolk House, Koxbury, 
November G, 1893. 

Like so many other eminent men of Boston, Mr. Bridge was descended from 
a Puritan ancestry. John Bridge, the first of the name in New England, came 
with the Hraintree Company, and was assigned to Cambridge in 1G32. lie was 
born in Essex County, England, about the year 1578. He was a near kinsman 
of a distinguished non-conformist divine of Norwich, who was an author, and 
a prominent member of the Westminster Assembly. He became a leading man 
in Cambridge, — was the first deacon of the church, organized in 1635; and was 
for twelve years one of the "Townsmen," as the selectmen were then called. 
In 1G37 he represented the town in the legislature, and was a member of that 
body four successive years. He was frequently employed in the settlement of 
estates, and in determining the boundaries of towns. The subject of this sketch 
presented to the City of Cambridge a bronze statue of his ancestor, the old 






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84 JSfecrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

Puritan, Avhic-h stands in that part of Cambridge Common near the junction of 
North Avenue and Waterhonse Street, looking toward the College; grounds. It 
is believed that this "was the lirst statue of a Puritan pioneer erected in New 
England. 

Tine live generations between John Bridge and Samuel James Bridge included 
a large number of eminent men. Matthew of the second generation lived in 
Lexington, and was a large landholder there, and an active and public-spirited 
citizen. His son "was a soldier in King Philip's Avar, and was prominent in the 
church and in his native town. One of them was a pioneer-in the settlement 
of Dresden, Maine. The Bridge Genealogy includes in its direct and collateral 
branches, "eminent lawyers, clergymen, physicians, an attorney general of the 
United States, judges of\the highest courts, foreign ministers, a member of the 
cabinet, and a president of the United States. 

Samuel James Bridge was the son of Samuel Bridge, who was born in Dres- 
den, Maine, November 14, 1778. He lived in Boston for many years, and was 
a member of the firm of Shaw, Baker & Bridge. Later in life he removed to 
his native town of Dresden, Maine. His son Samuel James was educated in 
the public schools, and was sent at the age of twelve to Wiscasset, Maine, and 
placed under the tuition of Lev. Dr. Packard. He completed his preparation 
for college in the Latin School in Boston, but the lack of money prevented him 
from entering. He became a. business man in Boston, and accumulated a large 
fortune, which he used in promoting various important public enterprises. In 
IS 11 he Avas appointed Principal Appraiser in the Custom House in Boston. 
After twelve years' service there he Avas made Appraiser General of the Pacific 
Coast, and continued to serve seven and a half years. His Avork consisted of 
t',-e supervision of all the customs on the Pacilic Coast, including California, 
Oregon and Washington. 

Lie retired from business a number of years ago, and spent his summers at 
the old home in Dresden, Maine, lie travelled extensively in all parts of the 
world. 

He Avas never married. Harvard College conferred upon him the degree of 
Master of Arts in 1880. 

David Bkainahd Weston, of CharlestoAvn, Massachusetts, wa-v born in Lon- 
donderry, Vermont, May 29, 1815, and died in Boston,' Dec. 22, 1893. He Avas 
educated in the public schools, and at LaAvreuce Academy, Grc/ton. His father 
died when he was very young, and he Avas left, more than most young men, to 
make his own way in tin; world. He became a useful and prosperous citizen 
of CluirlestoAvn, and Avas elected to positions of responsibility and of honor 
from year to year, until Oharlestown became a part of Boston. lie married 
Lucy Hutchinson, daughter of Dr. Ilczekiah and Lucy Hutchinson, May 30, 
1853. They had one son, Rev. Henry C. Weston. 

lie Avas elected a resident member of this Society, April 5, 1882. 

Low \ni> Dukfikld Neill, A.B., D.D., of Minneapolis, a corresponding mem- 
ber of this Society, elected February 7, 1877, Avas born in Philadelphia, August 
9, 1823, and died in Minneapolis, Minnesota, September 2(5, 1893. lie Avas the 
son of Dr. Henry Neill and Maria Diiffielcl. His grandfather, also a physician, 
Avas Dr. John Neill, Avhose father, John Neill, an Irish laAvyer, settled in LeAvis 
County, Delaware, in 1739. 

lie entered upon his college course at the University of Pennsylvania, but Avas 
graduated at Amherst College in 1842. He Avas a student at Andover Theological 
Seminary one year, and completed his theological studies under Lev. Albert 
Barnes and Lev. Dr. Thomas Brainard of Philadelphia, lie was ordained in 
Illinois, April 20, 1818, and organized the First Presbyterian Church in St. Paul, 
Minnesota, in 1849, and remained its pastor till IS;")."). In later years he left the 
Presbyterian Church and was connected with the Reformed Episcopal Church. 

The most important work of his life A" as done in connection with schools and 
colleges, and with historical literature. He took the lead in establishing schools 
in St. Paul, and in 1853 founded the Baldwin School, and later the College of 
St. t'aul, of which he was president. Me was chancellor of the University of 
Minnesota, 1858-G1. During the War he served as chaplain of a Minnesota 
Regiment, and in 1864 he became one of President Lincoln's private secretaries. 
In IH(!9 he Avas appointed consul to Dublin, Ireland. He resigned this position 
after two years, and returned to his adopted State. lie founded Macalister Col- 



1895.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society, 85 

lege and was its president from 1872 to 1884. Later ho served the same college 
as professor of History, Literature and Political Economy. lie was an enter- 
prising and successful president and professor. 

lie became known as an author early in life. In 1858 he published a " History 
of Minnesota." In 1867 he published " Threads of Maryland Colonial History." 
The next year he brought out " Virginia Vetusta"; and in 1871 " English Col- 
onization of America"; in 1870 " Founders of Maryland"; in 1885 " Virginia 
Under James the First"; and the next year " Virginia Carolorum." He was a 
prominent member of the Minnesota Historical Society, and made many contri- 
butions to its publications. 

Lafayette College conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity in 
18(H). 

Dr. Neill married Nancy Hall, of Snow Hill, Maryland, October 4, 1847, who 
survives him. 

Joskimi Buknktt, Esq., a life member, elected June 7, 187G, was born in 
Southborough, Massachusetts, November 11, 1820. lie was one of five chil- 
dren of Charles and Keziah (Pond) Burnett, and passed the iirst few years of his 
life in the old homestead near Southville. lie received his early education in 
the district schools of his native town and afterwards attended the English and 
Latin School, at Worcester, where he lived for two years after he was fifteen. 

In 1837, he moved to Boston and was associated as clerk and as partner with 
Theodore Metcalf on Tremont street. He left this business in 1854 and estab- 
lished the well known firm of manufacturing chemists, Joseph Burnett & Co., 
at 27 Central Street. 

In 1818, he married Josephine, daughter of Edward and Ruth (Torrey) Cutter 
of Boston, by whom he had twelve children: 1. Edward, Harvard '71; Repre- 
sentative in Congress 1880-88; married Mabel, daughter and only child of Hon. 
James Russell Lowell. 2. Harry, Harvard '73, and 3. Robert Manton, assoc- 
iated in business with their father. The latter married Margaret Hall. 4. Rev. 
Waldo, Oxford Univ., B.A. 1878; rector of St. Mark's Church, Southborough. 
5. Josephine, wife of Charles A. Kidder. 6. Esther, wife of George Peabody 
Gardner. 7. Ruth, a sister in the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Albany. 8. 
Charles Cutter, with the N. Y., N. II. & H. R. R. ; married Ethel Raymond 
Mason. 0. Richard Torrey, died 1807. 10. John Torrey, assistanbpost-master 
of Huston. 11. Louisa, wife of Charles F. Choate, Jr. 12. Elinor, at home; 
unmarried. ' 

In Is.'jO, he built " Deerfoot," on the extensive lands of Deerfoot Farm which 
lie then owned, and on which lie kept one of the finest herds of Jersey cows in 
tills country. He was a pioneer in high-bred stock and was among the first 
Importers from the Channel Islands. 

In 1862, he built ami gave to the parish the stone Church of St. Mark's, in the 
centre of the village of Southborough. An ardent churchman, he soon after- 
wards founded and gave St. Mark's School, a school for boys under Church 
manuuement. Mr. Burnett was during his life vestryman of St. Paul's, Ilopkin- 
ton ; St. John's, Fram Ingham; Holy Trinity, Marlborough; and was a member 
of the original corporation of the Church of the Advent, Boston. 

In 1878 and 1870, he was president of the Boston Druggists' Association.. 
He was appointed prison commissioner by Governor Rice, and was chairman 
of that body which built the Reformatory Prison for Women at Sherborn. It 
Would be Impossible* in so short a notice, to speak of the many offices he has 
held. 

He died from the effects of a carriage accident on Saturday, August 11, 1894, 
and was buried in the churchyard of the church he built, on Wednesday, August 
15th, when the Bishop of the Diocese and many distinguished clergy and laity 
were present. Mr. Burnett's life was one constant effort to do good and to 
benefit his felloAvmen. He will long be remembered as a sincere and devout 
churchman, a strictly honorable man of business, a, liberal promoter of high- 
class education, a most generous friend of the poor and oppressed whom he 
never failed to help with counsel and money. It has been written of him that 
he leaves behind him a record without a blot. 

liij lim. Waldo Burnett, A.M., of /Southborough, Mass. 

Professor Eijen Norton IIorsfokd, A.M., M.D., was born July 27, 1818, at 
Moscow in Western New York. His father, Jerediah Horsford, came from 
Vermont to Moscow as a missionary to the Seneca Indians. This early asso-- 
VOL. XLIX. 8* 















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i 
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8G Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

ciation of the son with the red men doubtless had much to do with his later 
interest in the study of the Indian dialects. II is mother, before her marriage 
Charity Maria Norton of Goshen, Connecticut, traced her descent from John 
Mason, the famous captain in the Pequot war. Her father, Ebenezer Norton, 
and her grandfather, Colonel Ebenezer Norton, served in the War of the Revo- 
lution. Both parents of Professor Horslord were persons of strong character 
and generous spirit, and exerted decided influence for good in the young com- 
munity where they had made their home. The mother especially seems to have 
had much literary taste and fondness for books. The son inherited these ten- 
dencies, and was known among his playmates as a marvel of general information. 
It was his favorite amusement to collect the fossils which abounded on his 
father's farm. He was 'sent to the best schools, and at the age of nineteen 
graduated as a civil engineer from the Rensselaer Institute of Troy, New York. 
He was then employed on the Geological Survey of the State of New York, and 
from 1840 to 1844 was Professor of Mathematics and the Natural Sciences in 
the Albany Female Academy. One of the most highly valued of the tokens of 
success which from time to time came to him, was a gold medal, received in 
1841, from the Young Men's Association of Albany, for a prize essay on " The 
Mechanical Powers." In December, 18+4, he went to Germany to study chem- 
istry, and spent two years at Giessen under Baron Liebig. On returning to 
America he was elected to the Rum ford Professorship of the Application of 
Science to the Useful Arts, in Harvard University, lie filled this position with 
enthusiasm and success for sixteen years. His investigations in chemistry led 
to inventions, which proved to be of large use and of great commercial value, 
and in 18(>3 he retired from the Rum ford Professorship and gave his attention 
to manufactures based upon these inventions. In 1847 lie was elected a Resi- 
dent Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His election as a 
Resident Member of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society was in 
1800. In 1873, he was United States Commissioner to the Vienna Exhibition. 
In 187G, he served as a juror at the Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia. He 
was twice appointed an Examiner of the United States Mint. He was one of 
the board of malingers of the Sons of the Revolution. He visited Norway in 
1880, and was at Carlsbad in 181)0. After leaving the Rum ford Professorship 
he continued to reside in Cambridge until his death, January 1, 181)3. 

Professor Horsford married in 1847, Mary L'llonimedieu Gardiner, daughter 
of Hon. Samuel Smith Gardiner of Shelter Island, New York., Four daughters 
were born of this marriage, Lilian, Mary Katharine, Gertrude Hubbard, who 
married Andrew Fiske, Esq. of Boston, and Mary Gardiner, who married the 
late Judge Benjamin R. Curtis, and herself died in 181)3. Mrs. Mary L'H. Hors- 
ford died in 1855. In 1857 Professor Horsford married her sister, Phoebe Day- 
ton Gardiner, who survives him. The only child of this marriage is a daughter, 
Cornelia. After the death of Mr. Gardiner, his large estate at Shelter Island 
came into the possession of Professor Horsford, and he usually spent his sum- 
mers there, in the old manor-house. He interested himself in studying the an- 
tiquities of the island, and erected a monument to the Quakers who found 
shelter there from Puritan persecution. In the comparative leisure of his later 
years, he became deeply interested in endeavoring to trace the routes of the 
Northmen, who early visited this continent. With unwearied zeal and patience 
he studied the sagas, pored over the ancient charts, explored the coast of New 
England, and at length became assured that he found in Cambridge the location 
of the house built by Leif Ericson, and that at Watertown on the Charles River 
he discovered the long lost Norumbega, the settlement of the Icelandic voyagers 
who after Leif Ericson visited V inland. Here he erected a substantial stone 
tower to mark the spot. The results cf his researches in this direction were 
embodied in a series of monographs, richly illustrated with copies of ancient 
charts and maps. In 181) 1, the Scandinavian societies of North America, in 
testimony of their appreciation of Professor Ilors ford's efforts to demonstrate 
the discovery and colonization of America by the Northmen, presented him in 
their annual assembly, an engrossed address, framed in wood from Norway, 
elaborately carved by a Norwegian lady. In 181)2 the King of Denmark created 
him a Knight Commander of the third grade of the Order of Dannebrog. In 
the same spirit the Scandinavian societies of Boston united in a special memorial 
service for Professor Horsford a few weeks after his decease. 

His publications include the following volumes : — " Discovery of America by 
Northmen," with illustrations and maps; "Discovery of the Ancient City of 



1805.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society, 



87 






Norumbcga," with map and phototypes; " The Problem of the Northmen," with 
phototypes and maps; " The Defenses of Norumbega," with 100 maps and 20 
heliotypes; "The Landfall of Leif Erikson " ; " Leif's House in Vinelaud," 
published since his decease. Two other volumes are yet to be published under 
the care of Miss Cornelia Horsford. Besides these volumes he published a 
large number of pamphlets, and printed articles in the scientific periodicals. 
When the Cochituate water was introduced in Boston, he prepared a paper con- 
taining the results of an exhaustive investigation into the best material for 
water-pipes, and when he refused to receive pecuniary compensation was pre- 
sented by the city with a handsome service of plate. 

lie made generous use of the wealth which came to him as the fruit of his 
Chemical inventions. Wellesley College was, so far as is known, the object of 
his largest benefactions. He was, from the beginning, president of its Board 
of Visitors. He established there, by a large endowment, the system already 
known at Harvard University, by which the leading professors, without loss of 
salary, are to have every seventh year as a period of rest and European travel. 
lie enlarged and endowed the library, provided a fund for scientific apparatus, 
and in many other ways studied to promote the attractiveness and elllciency of 
the institution. 

Professor Horsford was a cheerful, cordial, genial man. His high sense of 
honor, his large-hearted and generous public spirit, his unquestioned honesty of 
purpose, — these are among the characteristics which impressed those who knew 
him. He was an enthusiastic teacher, an ingenious and persistent investigator, 
a devout Christian, a man who sought to make life brighter to his fellow men. 

Jhj Jiev. George M. Adams, D.D., of Anburndale, Mass. 

General Edward Winslow Hincks was born in Bucksport, Maine, May 30, 
1830. His father was Elisha Hincks. His mother was, before her marriage, 
Elizabeth Hopkins Wcntworth. 

lie could trace his descent through the Winslows to the Mayflower. He re- 
ceived a common school education in his native town, and at the age of fifteen 
went to Bangor, where from 1845 to 1849 he was an apprentice in a printing 
office. He then went to Boston, and was in the printing and publishing busi- 
ness until 18")(i, when he was appointed to a position in* the office of the Secretary 
of the Commonwealth, and prepared for publication the State Census of 1855. 
He was a representative from Boston in the Legislature of 1855, and was also 
a member of the City Council from Ward 3. In 1850 he rem6ved to Lynn, still 
retaining his position in the Secretary's otllce, and studying law with the en- 
couragement and assistance of Hon. Anson Rurlingame. In 1859 he was ap- 
pointed adjutant of the Eighth Regiment of Massachusetts militia. 

In Dcecmber, 18G0, when Major Anderson was holding Fort Moultrie and 
expecting attack by the forces of South Carolina, Mr. Hincks offered his services 
for the defence of the Fort in a letter which brought grateful acknowledgment 
from Major Anderson. On this ground Gen. Hincks has been spoken of as the 
lh>t volunteer of the war. April 15th, 1861, on receipt of the news of the capture 
of Fort Sumter and of President Lincoln's call for troops, Mr. Hincks hastened 
to Boston ami urged the Governor to accept the Eighth Regiment as part of the 
Massachusetts quota of 1,500 men called for by the President. Gov. Andrew 
accepted the proposal, and Mr. Hincks rode the same evening to Lynn, Salem, 
Beverly and Marblehead, and sent messages to Newburyport and Gloucester, 
notifying the men to rendezvous in Boston. The next morning, April 10th, he 
inarched into Eaneuil Hall with the three companies from Marblehead. On the 
17th he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the Eighth Regiment, and on 
the 18th left with the regiment for Washington. Three days later a detachment 
from his regiment, under his command, boarded the frigate Constitution, lying 
aground at Annapolis, lightened her of her guns, floated her and worked her to 
sea. The next day, with a picked detachment from his regiment, he took pos- 
session of the rolling stock of the Baltimore ami Washington Railroad. The 
engines had been disabled and the tracks torn up, but the skilled mechanics of 
his command soon put the engines and road in running order. For these ser- 
vices Col. Hincks and his regiment received the thanks of Congress. April 20th 
he reached Washington, and was the same day appointed second lieutenant of 
cavalry in the regular army, that being the only grade in which an officer could 
enter the regular service at that time. 

The principal engagements in which Gen. Hincks participated were the battle 



88 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [Jan. 

of Ball's Bluff, the siege of Yorktown, the battles of West Point, Fair Oaks, 
Oak Grove, J 'each Orchard, White Oak Swamp, Chantilly, South Mountain, 
Antlctam, and the assault on Petersburg* June 15, 18G4. lie was wounded at 
White Oak. -Swamp, and at Antietam was carried off the held, supposed to be 
mortally wounded. After this battle he was brevetted colonel in the regular 
army, and after the assault on Petersburg he received the brevet of brigadier- 
general in the regular army. After the close of the war, retaining his position 
in the army, he held important commands until December, 1870, when he was 
retired from active service for disability resulting from his wounds. In 18GG, 
his home was changed from Lynn to Cambridge, Mass. From 1870 to 1880, he 
held the position of governor of the Soldiers' Homes, llrst at Hampton, Vir- 
ginia, and then at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After his return to Cambridge he 
was repeatedly chosen on the Board of Aldermen of the city. He was twice 
married, and had two children, but neither wife nor child survives him. A 
very lovely and brilliant daughter, Bessie Hincks, a student at the Harvard An- 
nex, now Raclcliffe College, died in 1885, at the age of twenty. Gen. Hincks 
left by will to Radcliffe College a library fund in memory of his daughter. 

The only near relative that survives him is an older brother, Capt. Elisha 
Hincks, who as well as Gen. Hincks was dangerously wounded at Antietam, 
and who faithfully nursed the General iu the last months of his life. 

General Hincks died Feb. 14, l<s;)4, after a long and painful illness, resulting 
from the wounds received in battle. He was elected a resident member of this 
Society, Jan. 3, 1872. 

By liev. George M. Adams, D.D.^ of Auburndale, 3Iass. 

James Wiieaton Converse was born in Thompson, Connecticut, Jan. 11, 
1808. When he was six years old he removed with his parents to Woodstock, 
Conn., and two years later to Dover, Mass., and from there to Needham, Mass. 
At the age of thirteen he came to Boston, a slender lad, but full of energy and 
ambition. His uncles, Joseph and Benjamin Converse, gave him employment, 
and seven years later assisted him to commence business for himself in the 
Boylston Market. In 1832, he entered into partnership with William Ilardwick 
in the boot, shoe and leather business. In 1833, he joined Isaac Field to 
conduct a hide and leather business at 43 and 45 Broad St., under the Arm 
name of Field & Converse. Five years later Isaac Field retired, and his brother 
John Field took his place. For nearly forty years the firm of Field & Converse 
was widely known and honored in this country and abroad. In 1870 Mr. Con- 
verse retired from the business to give attention to his growing railroad, bank- 
ing, real estate and other interests. 

He was one of the directors of the Mechanics Bank of Boston, from its 
organization in 183G, and its president from 1847 to 188G. In 1870 he was ap- 
pointed receiver of the old Hartford and Erie Railroad, now the New York and 
New England, and piloted that corporation through a perilous time. He was 
at a later day president of the Boston Rubber Shoe Company, of the Colorado 
Smelting Company, and of the Boston Land Company. He had large invest- 
ments at the West, especially in and around Grand Rapids, Michigan. 

Mr. Converse married in 1833, Emeline Coolidge, daughter of Nathan Coolidge 
of Boston. She died a few years before her husband. They had three children, 
James \V . Converse, Jr., who was a lieutenant in the 24th Massachusetts Regi- 
ment in the late war, and who died in 187G ; Costello Coolidge Converse; and 
Emma Maria Converse. At the age of thirteen, Mr. Converse joined the Charles 
Street Baptist Church in Boston. He w r as one of the original members of the 
Federal Street Church, and in 1837 became one of its deacons, an office which 
he held also in other churches with which he was afterwards connected. At 
the time of his death he was senior deacon of the First Baptist Church in Bos- 
son. He was chosen a resident member of the New-England Historic Genea- 
ological Society, June 1, 1870. 

Dea. Converse was liberal in his gifts to the needy and to educational and be- 
nevolent institutions. It has been said that in the latter part of his life he gave 
away not less than lifty thousand dollars a year. But more than this, — he gave 
his time, his effort, his sympathy in large pleasure. He died at Swampscott, 
Aug- 2G, 1894. He leaves behind an honored name, a fragrant memory, and a 
noble example. 

By Jiw. George M. Adams, JJ.D., of Aiiburudale, Mass. 



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1895.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 89 

Colonel Charles Colcock Jones, Jit., LL.l)., was born in Savannah, 
Georgia, Oct. 20, 1831, and died at his home, Montrose, near Augusta, Georgia, 
July 11), 185)8. fie was the son of the Rev. Charles Coleoek Jones, I). I)., a 
distinguished writer and minister of the Southern Presbyterian Church. His 
great-grandfather, Major John Jones, served in the revolutionary army, and 
lost his life at the siege of Savannah in 1775). Me graduated at Princeton Col- 
lege in 1852, and at the law school of Harvard University in 1855. Returning 
to Savannah, he entered upon the practice of his profession, and soon became a 
leader at the bar. Me enjoyed the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens 
to a degree amounting to positive affection, resulting in his elevation to the 
mayoralty in '18(50. At the end of his term in 1861, the state of the country was 
such that he preferred to serve his section of the dissolved Union in a military 
capacity, and declining a second nomination as mayor, he entered the service of 
the Confederate States as an officer of the Chatham Artillery. During the whole 
of the war he was connected with the ordnance department of the service, 
holding at the close of hostilities the ollice of Chief of Artillery for the military 
district of (Georgia and the third military district of South Carolina, with the 
rank of colonel. Mis knowledge of what took place in the section of country 
over iyhich his command extended, is well displayed in his excellent account of 
the siege of Savannah in December, 1864, and other writings of his which re- 
late to that period of our country's history.. 

After the war Col. Jones removed to New York, and was engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession there until 1877, when he returned to Georgia, and was in 
legal practice at Augusta (ill the end of his life. His career as a writer on 
arcTuuo logical and historical subjects began in the year 1850, when he delivered 
the address at the twentieth anniversary of the Georgia Historical Society, of 
wliieh he was then a member, and which he subsequently served as correspond- 
ing secretary for several years. His subject on that occasion was " The Indian 
Remains in Southern Georgia." From that time until his death he was pretty 
constantly engaged in literary work of some sort. A list of his very numerous 
published works may be found in the annual reports of the American Historical 
Association,. 1880-185)3. The most important of them are: "History of Geor- 
gia"; "Dead Towns of Georgia"; " Antiquities of the Southern Indians"; 
" Myths from the Georgia ("oast"; "Life of Commodore Josiah Tatnall " ; 
" Historical Sketch of the Chatham Artillery"; " Ancient Tumuli ou the Savan- 
nah River"; "Siege of Savannah in 1770"; " Siege of Savannah in December, 
Is''.!"; " Historical Sketch of Toino-chi-ehl " ; "Biographical Sketches of the 
Delegatei from Georgia to the Continental Congress." Two volumes of his 
History of Georgia, were published in 1883, bringing the narrative down to the 
erection of Georgia into an independent State. Me had collected the materials 
for two other volumes which would "deal with Georgia as a Commonwealth." 
Besides the reputation which he acquired as a lawyer and a man of letters, 
Colonel Jones \vus known as an indefatigable collector of autographs., and of 
objects of interest in the Held of arclucology. He was a useful member of 
many of the historical and scientific societies in this country and in Europe. 
His connection with the New-England- Historic Genealogical Society, as a cor- 
responding member, dated from April 4, 1883. Me was married twice: in No- 
vember, lSfiS, to Miss Ruth Berrien Whitehead, who after a short period of 
married life, died leaving a daughter; and in October, 18G3, to her cousin, Miss 
Eva Berrien Eve, by whom lie had a son. 

As has been well said of him, " lie was a gallant soldier, a line jurist, an able 
writer and a brilliant scholar." 

Abridged by Iiev. George, M. Adams, D.t>., of Aubnrndaie, Mass., from a sketch 
furnished by William Harden, Esq., of Savannah, (fa. 

William Frederick Poole, LL.D., a corresponding member, elected Feb. 1, 
188-j. was born in Salem, Mass., December 21, 1821, the son of Ward and Eliza 
(Wilder) Poole, being descended from John Poole, who in 1G35 was the leading 
proprietor of Reading in the same state. Ward Poole had one daughter and six 
sons, of whom William was the second, the third being Henry Ward Poole 
(A.M. Vale), who was for many years professor in the National College of 
Mines in the City of Mexico, and was a recognized authority on the physical 
properties of musical sounds. 

William attended the common schools of Danvers, to which town the portion 
of Salem in which he was born was soon afterwards set off, and prepared for 












• 






I 






.'. 






90 



Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 



[Jan. 



college at Leicester Academy. He entered Yale College in 1842, but his studies 
being intermitted for three years, while he taught school to earn money for 
their completion, he graduated in 1849, President Timothy Dwigllt being a 
classmate. 

His life work was determined, perhaps not consciously, while he was only a 
sophomore in college, by his becoming assistant librarian and then librarian of 
his society, the Brothers in Unity. Developing in his work as a student, the 
disposition, so characteristic of his literary work in later years, to e: plore new 
territory, his attention was soon called to the great amount of valuable material 
contained in the bound sets of reviews, with which the Brothers' library was 
well furnished, and to the need of some key to their contents. Without thought 
of its publication he commenced an index to these periodicals, and working with 
his customary diligence soon completed it. A demand immediately arose for 
its publication, and the first edition appeared in 1848, while he was a junior. 
The work attracted much attention in Europe as well as in this country, and 
Mr. Boole was soon induced to begin the preparation of a much enlarged edition. 
In 1851 he became assistant librarian (under Charles Folsom) of the Boston 
Athcmeum, and in 1853 librarian of the Mercantile Library of Boston. In the 
same year the second edition of his Index was published, a large octavo of 520 
pages. In 1855 he was recalled to the A then scum as librarian, where he re- 
mained until 18G8. Engaging for some months in special work as a library 
expert, he assisted in the organization of several libraries, and in 18G9 became 
librarian of the Cincinnati Public Library, which he left in 1873 to undertake 
the building up of the Chicago Public Library. His work in that position was 
a marked success, and led to his being appointed in 1887 to take charge of the 
ucav Newberry Library in Chicago. The selection and purchase of this line 
library and the planning of the building gave full scope to his ripened powers, 
and was a fitting crown to his life work. He was quite suddenly called away 
just after he had superintended the removal of the books to the new building. 
The third edition of his Index was published in 1882, with the collaboration 
of many other librarians, a truly monumental work of nearly 1500 pages, fol- 
lowed since by two " five-year" supplements. 

He was one of the founders, and for two years president, of the American 
Library Association, and a constant contributor to its organ, the Library Jour- 
nal, and was looked to as a leading authority on all library matters, lie did 
more than any one else to revolutionize library architecture in the interest of 
convenient arrangement, wholesomeness for the occupants, and good light. 
But with all this work in his chosen profession, Dr. Poole combined a constant 
succession of literary labors. He had a keen relish for the study of obscure 
and controverted points in American history, and became a pioneer in the held 
of exact and scientific historiography. In Ford's Bibliography of members of 
the American Historical Association, of vvhich Dr. Poole was president in 1887, 
will be found a list of his writings; it is worth while now merely to recall some 
of the subjects elucidated by them : — The Popham Colony in Maine; Witchcraft 
and the Mathers; Early Anti-Slavery Opinions; The Ordinance of 1787, and 
the Early History of the West and Northwest; The Kentucky and Virginia 
Resolutions. His last work in this line was a trenchant review in The Dial, of 
Adams's Massachusetts ; its Historians and its History. 

He received the degree of Doctor of Law r s from the Northwestern University, 
and was a member of its Corporation at the time of his death. In 1893 he de- 
livered an able address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society in that institution on 
The University Library and the University Curriculum. 

Dr. Poole was of commanding stature and line presence. His health was per- 
fect, and he was thus able to accomplish the onerous tasks that fell to his lot 
without friction or any sense of being burdened, lie was always happy in his 
work, and his sunny temperament and disposition won him the esteem and af- 
fection of all who w r ere associated with him. Morally and spiritually he was 
akin, as he was by descent, to the Puritans whom he loved to defend against 
their detractors, and his character, unsullied by any breath of reproach or sus- 
picion, won him the sobriquet of " the good Doctor," which attached to him in 
Ins last years. 

By IP. I. Fletcher, A.M., Librarian of Amherst College. 

Hon. Aiuel Standish Tiiukston, who became a member of the New-England 
Historic Genealogical Society June 3, 1868, died Sept 23, 1894, in West Brad- 
dock, Pa. 








































. 
























1805.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 01 

Tic was the only son of Stephen and Philomelia (Parish) Thurston, and was 
born June 11, 18i0, in Goffstowrt, N. H. Mr. Thurston prepared for College 
In the Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, N. 11. He was admitted in 1828 to the 
freshman class of Amherst College, but left at the end of one year and entered 
upon the study of law, being engaged, meanwhile In teaching school, lie en- 
tered upon the practice of his profession in 183(5, and settled in Elmira, N. Y. 
lie soon won a local reputation and had a wide and lucrative business as a partner 
of the law firm Wisner & Thurston. In 1850 he was appointed Judge and 
Surrogate of Chemung County. He retired from this position af >r live years, 
and in 1859 he was appointed by Governor Morgan State Assessor a..d a member 
of the Board of Equalization. He served as a Supervisor of the erection of the 
County buildings, and for'a long period as one of the Board of Managers of the 
New York Reformatory. At the suggestion of Mr. Brockway, the Superin- 
tendent, he drew the Act providing for indeterminate sentences to that institu- 
tion, which has become known as the " Elmira system." Later, Judge Thurston 
was senior partner of the law firms of Thurston, Hart & Benn, and also of 
Thurston, Hart & McGuire, which had the largest practice of any in the county. 
After retiring from these partnerships he still had his law-office and continued 
to practise his profession. 

At the age of eighty-four years he was vigorous in body, his mind clear and 
alert, his hand carried a steady pen, and he retained all his faculties unim- 
paired. His death was occasioned instantly by a fall, while on a visit to his 
grand-daughter, in West Braddock, Pa. 

Judge Thurston in general appearance was tall, well built, and of commanding 
presence. His carriage was erect, his stop elastic, his greeting hearty, and his 
mind a store-house of ready information. He was respected for his sterling 
integrity, honored for his kindness, and beloved for his gentleness and kindly 
deeds. Mr. Thurston married first, Sepi,. 8, 183G, Miss Julia Clark Hart, who 
died April 17, 1844; by this marriage there were three children. He married 
second, May 7, 1846, Miss Cornelia Sophia Hull, who died June 27, 18G5; by 
this marriage there were live children. 

Judge Thurston married third, April 12, 18G7, Mrs. Georgiana Gibson nee 
Converse, who with live of his eight children survive him. 

By Jitv. E, 0. Jameson, Boston, J\faas. & 

Bkknauh Bkmis WniTTKMonE, A.B., was a son of Bernard and Jane (Holmes) 
Whltteinore, and was born at Boston, May 15, 1817, his grandfather being 
Nathaniel Whittemore, a Revolutionary soldier. His boyhood days were spent 
at lVterboro', N. II., where his parents removed in his infancy. His college 
preparatory education was at Phillips Exeter Academy, and he graduated from 
Harvard College in ls;i:>. Mr. Whittemore studied law and was admitted to the 
Hillsboto' Count v bar in 1842. After practising law a short time at 1'almer, 
Mih> , and Afnher.sti he removed to Nashua, New Hampshire, and here his real 
life >vork wast taken up. 

With his brother P. 1'. Whltteinore, he purchased the Weekly Gazette, and 
assumed the editorial charge Nov. 2(5, 184(1. For nearly forty-three years he 
was the editor of that paper. Sept. 1, 1872, a daily edition was first put out, 
which he and his brother continued to publish in connection with the weekly 
until July 1, 188'J. Mr. Whltlemorc then retired frem the active duties of a 
newspaper man, after being continuously at the helm for over forty years. He 
was an able, fluent, graceful, forcible writer, whose liberal education had been 
continually added to by constant study. His fund of general information was 
marvellous, and on all subjects he was a writer of ability. An uncompromising 
democrat, he advocated the cause of that party with no uncertain pen, and did 
yeoman service for it for over two-score years. 

At the incorporation of the City of Nashua in 1853, he was the first democratic 
candidate for mayor, and although his party was not victorious, he received a 
highly complimentary vote. In 1852-53 he was a member of the New Hamp- 
shire senate. He was an alderman of the city in 1800, and city treasurer in 
1MI1. He was a trustee of the public library, from the day of its formation to 
his death, and for many years was a constant attendant at the Unitarian church. 
Quite recently he published a genealogy of the Whittemore family. He never 
married. He died March 5, 1893, in Cambridge, Mass., of heart failure, at the 
house of Judge Nathaniel Holmes, where he was on a visit. 

Mr. Whittemore, when at Exeter Academy, as he wrote, laid down one rule 



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02 Necrology of Historic Goiealoyical Society. [Jan. 

for himself: to work "diligently but not vehemently," or as Goethe has it, 
" Ohne I Inst, ohne Itnst"' ; and this rule he apparently kept through life. 

lie was a quiet, unassuming man, who did not care for public office, but 
pursued the even tenor of his way through all the vicissitudes of a country 
editor's life. As a lawyer lu; was one of the best informed in the bar of the 
count)' where he practised, as at his death he was, if not the oldest, next to the 
oldest member in the county. 

Ills opinion was much sought for, and always showed the result of careful, 
conservative judgment. To his friends he was a genial man, whose rare fund 
of information was being continually drawn upon. Fie was a gentleman of the 
old school, and did noble service for the up-building of Nashua. 

For much of the material in this sketch 1 am indebted to an article in the 
Nashua Gazette. .^r* 

He was elected a corresponding member of this Society, November 1, 18o4. 

By Caleb W. Loring, A.M., of Boston. 

Rev. Riciiakd Manning Ciiipman, a corresponding member of this Society, 
elected in October, 1848, died in Devon, Pa., Aug. 15, 1893. lie was born in 
Salem, Mass., Jan. 12, 1806, son of Richard Manning and Elizabeth (Gray) 
Chipman. Thomas Cliipman of Dorchester, England, about 1567-1623, was an- 
cestor of the American family. His son John 1 came early to this country, and 
died April 7, 1708, aged 94. The line continues through Dea. Samuel, 2 Rev. 
John, 3 born in Barnstable, II. G. 1711, and pastor in North Beverly sixty years, 
till his death March 23, 1775, aged 84; Capt. Samuel, 4 of Beverly, 1726-61 ; 
John, 5 born in Ipswich 1740, and died 1819 : Dea. Richard Manning, 6 born 1786; 
Richard Manning. 7 Fuller and interesting details of this Chipman line may be 
found in a record furnished by our associate member to the l^ssex Institute (Col- 
lections, Vol. 11, page 283). 

Throughout life his interest and skill in genealogical studies was unabated. 
His mind was alert and keen, his memory was a rich store-house, and he did 
honor to his membership, which he highly prized in our Society. He was edu- 
cated at Kimball Union Academy, Dartmouth College (1832), and Princeton 
Theological Seminary. Pastor at Ilarwinton, Ct., 1S35-9; Athol, Mass., 1839- 
51; Guilford, Ct., 18o2-8 ; acting pastor, Wojeottville, 1859-01; MUldle Haddam, 
1861-3; Hyde Park, Mass., 1864-6; East Granby, Ct., 1866-70; Lisbon, 1871-9; 
without charge, Hyde Park, Mass., 1879-83; Philadelphia, with his son Richard 
Harrison Chipman after'. 

lie married, June 1, 1835, Mary, daughter of Rev. Frederick and Elizabeth 
(Bunnell) Harrison, of Itoxbury, Ct., who died March 28, 1893. 

Besides the Chipman article above alluded to, he published (1) A Discourse 
on Ecclesiastical Prosperity, 1839; (2) On Free Discussion, 1839 ; (3) On the 
Maintenance of Moral Purity, 1841; (4) Memoir of EU Thorp, 1842: and (5) 
History of Ilarwinton, Ct., 18(H). 

By lie v. lluiry A. lla.ren, I). I)., of Auburndale, Mass. 

Ethan Nelson Cobukx, son of Lemuel and Hannah (Post) Coburn, was born 
at Fairlee, Vt., 13 April, 1821, and married, 23 April, 1845, Iluldah Ellen Bruce. 
They had six children. 

Mr. Coburn was an undertaker at Charlestown, Mass., and long prominent as 
a citizen. For many years he was a member of the board of overseers of the 
poor, and, in 1873, was a member and chairman of the Common Council — that 
being the last separate city government of Charlestown. lie was one of the 
committee which edited and printed the two volumes of the late Thomas B. 
Wyman, on " The Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown." Mr. Coburn de- 
voted much attention to the collection of genealogical and historical works, and 
was profound in his knowledge of published Americana. His library was well 
selected and became valuable, lie was a great reader, fluent in conversation 
and widely conversant with Charlestown history, in which he manifested an 
abiding interest. His numerous critical and careful articles on that subject 
made his opinion authoritative. 

Mr. Coburn was in feeble health for the last year or two of his life; gave up 
business and retired to the home of his boyhood, now West Fairlee, Vt. The 
hoped-for improvement in health was not realized, and he returned to Charles- 
town, where he died 13. July, 1893. 

Mr. .Coburn became a resident member of the New-England Historic Genealo- 
gical Society, 1 February, 1871, and life member the same year. 

By Geo. A. Gordon, A.M., of Somerville, Mass. 






: 









1895.]- Book Notices. 93 



BOOK NOTICES. 

[The Editor requests persons sending books for notice to state, for the information of 
readers, the price of each book, with the amount to be added for postage when sent by 
mail.] 

The, Grasshopper in Lombard Street. By John Biddulpii Martin. London: 
The Leadenhall Press, Ltd. : Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, Kent & Co., Ltd. 
New York: Scribner & Welford. 1892. Crown 4to. 

This is a book of history, not of entomology. Tt. deals with the grasshopper 
as an, emblem, or, more preeisely, as a golden image and business sign. As a 
history it sets forth the experiences during three hundred and fifty years or 
more of one of the principal banking houses in London, known to fame, and 
for a long period to sight, by its projecting sign on Lombard street, the figure 
of a grasshopper. Other banking houses in the neighborhood were in like 
manner made manifest by signs, as the "Plough," the " Unicorn," the " Three 
Squirrels," the " Marigold," etc. The sign of the " Grasshopper" disappeared 
during a reconstruction of the bank building in 1794; though the Indication of 
the cut on page 230 of the book is that a copy of it yet exists within the build- 
ing, martially arrayed upon a metallic framework with six guns and eight pistols 
of the time of the Georges. These weapons are supposed to have been procured 
to put tin; bank in a state of defence against a city riot or like peril. The author 
does not \\x the date when the " Grasshopper" as an institution had its begin- 
ning, but it may be referred to the year 1C37, when Sir llichard Gresham was 
knighted by Henry VIII. and was granted a coat of arms, the crest of which is 
a grasshopper in gold. Gresham was one of the Company of Mercers and seems 
to have ranked as a goldsmith, in the financial meaning of that word. At any 
rate, he is recorded in the king's cash book as having been paid £100 for "a 
eheyne of flyne golde," a purchase incident to the fourth wedding of Henry VIII. 
That he was what would now be called a financier there is no doubt. He was 
an accredited agent of the English government in the Low Countries, and was 
frequently employed there in its money transactions. In that$ experience he 
saw the advantage of a bourse or money exchange, and projected such an in- 
stitution for London. It was not established, however, in that reign. That 
Sir liichard had an office in Lombard street may be regarded certain, for that 
W&n the sjtreet where the goldsmiths congregated; and as that was not an age 
of lettered signs; and as the title or style of the bank, the " Sign of the Grass- 
hopper," Is of immemorial date, its beginning must be held to be coeval with 
the famous Henry. That Sir Richard was a resident in London subsequently 
to Ids stay In Flanders is shown by the fact that he was Lord Mayor in 1537, 
which was two years before the sale of the chain of fine gold. 

It was, however, during the lifetime of his son, Sir Thomas Gresham, that 
the grasshopper as an emblem or image rose to fame above all contemporary 
Images of like quality. The bank premises have always been the spot now 
numbered 68 of Lombard street, and it is of record that Sir Thomas had his 
shop or office there In a building which was also his residence until his accu- 
mulated wealth enabled him to erect a dwelling house on Bishopsgate street, 
spacious enough and grand enough for the entertainment of royalty itself. 

The great fire of 1666 destroyed so many records public and private, includ- 
ing those of the Grasshopper, that its fortunes cannot be distinctly traced dur- 
ing a period of nearly one hundred years after the decease of Sir Thomas 
Gresham. But our author has, with indefatigable zeal, gathered information 
from remote sources, largely family histories, by which the succession of 
partnerships, or at least prominent members thereof, is traced. As to these 
persons and their transactions he makes up a curious and entertaining narrative, 
with abundant allusion to current events of their lifetimes. Throughout the 
author has touched here and there upon collateral themes, giving evidence, both 
In this and in his immediate task, of painstaking in his search and of fidelity to 
the facts. Within its field, which is given a proper amplitude, the book thus 
becomes a valuable one for reference, being furnished with a good index. To 
VOL. XLIX. 8 



94 Booh Notices. [Jan. 

this end it may well be kept in mind by any engaged in studying phases of Lon- 
don life from the period indicated down to comparatively recent times. It is 
handsomely bound and printed and contains thirty-seven illustrations, com- 
prising portraits, views, etc., pertinent to the subject. There are also plans of 
the Lombard street vicinity, showing among other things that the Grasshopper 
site is two hundred and forty-three feet distant from the entrance to the Royal 
Exchange on Cornhill. As an appendix is reproduced in antique type, with title 
page in facsimile, a rare pamphlet of the year 1G7G, entitled "The Mystery of 
the New-fashioned Goldsmiths or Bankers," etc., which might have had given 
it an alternative title, "A Counterblast against usury, coin-clipping and all 
sorts of nigging in money transactions." 

In the multiplicity of his allusions the author does not omit to inform Lon- 
don readers, for whom the book was especially written, of our grasshopper. 
He says : " Visitors to Boston (U.S.A.), may notice a grasshopper, serving as 
a vane, on the summit of Faneuil Mall, the cradle of liberty venerated by all 
Americans, and one of the oldest buildings in that city"; and he names our 
Sexton of the Old School as his authority in saying that the Boston grasshopper 
is an imitation, " a plagiarism," of that of the London Exchange. This refer- 
ence has seemed to make opportune for this number of the Register some 
remarks upon the Boston grasshopper, which appear on an earlier page. 

By Daniel W. Baker, Esq., of Boston. 

British Family Names: Their Origin end Meaning, with Lists of Scandinavian, 
Frisian, Anglo-Saxon and Norman Names. By Henry Barber, M.D., Author 
of " IP urn ess and Cartmel Notes," " The Cistercian Abbey of Maulbronn," 
"Some Queer Names," "The Shrine of St. Boniface at Eulda," "Popular 
Amusements in Germany,'* etc. London : Elliot Stock, G2 Paternoster Row, 
E. C. 1894. 1 Vol. 8vo. pp. 235. 

This interesting and valuable volume will be found to contain much useful 
information for those curious in the origin of family names, difficult of easy 
attainment elsewhere. The introductory essays to each list of British, Old 
Norse Personal, Frisian, Family and Personal, names are uncommonly learned 
and intelligent. Beside these are lists of the names from the i>omesday Book 
of Edward the Confessor, including landholders, tenants in chief and under- 
tenants, and the Roll of Battell Abbey. These occupy a third of the well printed 
volume, and deserve the unqualified approbation of the scholar in nomenclature. 
The remainder of the volume is devoted to an alphabetical list of British sur- 
names, of which more than eight thousand are cited, a remarkable monument 
of industry and careful investigation. The identity of names with geographical 
location is full and comprehensive; but we do not find the sources of origin or 
meaning of surnames equally satisfactory. To be sure a conception of such, 
to be adequate, would require its author to be familiar with the usages, cus- 
toms, habits and thoughts, as well as all the dialects, from the Euskarian to the 
Norman, appropriate to the various tribes and peoples that have left their 
impress on the names that have come down to the present. We do not under- 
stand Dr. Barber to profess any such encyclopaedic knowledge. The reader 
must not, therefore, be surprised to And a general lack of occupative deriva- 
tions, and of names individualized from some personal peculiarity, disposition, 
manners or appearance. Our author seems satisfied with an apparent locative 
derivation, when it is notorious that the reverse may be true, the location re- 
ceiving its proprietor's name or title. So of the Scandinavian mythology, a 
prolific source of Danish and Norse names. Many of the cited surnames are of 
Keltic or Cymric derivation, rather than of locality. Agglutination, transposi- 
tion, and other phonetic mutations have obscured the history of a vast number 
of names; and, in this respect, the British, probably from the great variety of 
races entering into their national composition, have been conspicuous. The 
honorable, resounding, proud names of one century have been clipped and de- 
graded in descent, till the arch-angel becomes Muggins ; and the Taillefer, de- 
rived from the prowess and strength of arm, which could drive the battle ax 
through a bar of iron, becomes that of a dozen negroes, pressing tobacco in a 
Virginia factory. The influence of custom or fashion has shown itself more in 
the baptismal than in the surname. The latter often survives, while the other 
perishes. Arthur, Owen, Alan, survive from the Cymric; Edward, Edwin, Al- 



189f>.] Book Notices. 95 

fred, from the Saxon ; Harry and Ralph from the Scandinavian; but they are 
almost the sole representatives of the iEthelreds and TKlf wards, the Olafs and 
Erics, the Merlins and Ofhis of the times before the conquest. As foreigners 
have been absorbed into the English race, their names have served to swell the 
vocabulary. In America, we have added a few from the Indian and the negro, 
races, and may, hereafter, from the Asiatics of late immigration. 
By Geo. A. Goi'don, Esq., of Somerville, Mass. 

Proceedings at the. Public Opening, September 28, 1803, of the Nexo Haven Colony 
Historical Society Building, erected by Henry F. English as a Memorial of 
James E. and Caroline F. English. Published by the Society. Tress of 
Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor. New Haven, Conn. 8vo. pp. Dl. 

This book contains the addresses delivered upon this occasion by Mr. Simeon 
E. Baldwin, the President of the Society; by Mr. Horace Day, the first 
. Secretary of the Society; and by Mr. Thomas H. Trowbridge, Secretary of 
the Society, All of these addresses are marked by careful thought and re- 
search, and contain many important facts in regard to the history of this 
early settled section of New England, from the time (1G43) when the articles of 
confederation were entered into by which the Colony of New Haven joined on 
equal terms with the colonies of Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, and Connecti- 
cut, in constituting the first American Union (the "United Colonies of New 
England"), down to the present. But the history of the New Haven Colony 
goes even farther back than the year 1643. Mr. Horace Day stated in his ad- 
dress that " for nearly a quarter of a century prior to its union with Connecticut, 
New Haven had an independent civil and political organization (although with- 
out a charter) and was the solitary instance of an absolutely independent state 
on the American continent." Mr. Simeon E. Baldwin, in his address, rightly 
lays much stress upon the great importance of the work our various historical 
societies are doing. I believe it is hardly possible to over-estimate the far- 
reaching effect of the thorough work that has been done and is being done by 
them ; in gathering arid preserving a wealth of material for the historians of 
our own times and of the future; and in implanting and stimulating in the 
minds of its members (and through them of the great multitude of our read- 
ing, thinking people) interest in and love for American and English history. 
And surely it will be admitted by all thoughtful people that 'historical studies 
have a very Important place in the mental development of man. 

jly Jlt'O. Daniel Bollins, of Woodsvilie, N. 21. 






Etibory of Jiaih and Environs, Sagadahock County, Maine, 1607-1894. With 
Illuntratintii. Hy Taukku McColm Rkkd. Portland, Me.: Lakeside Press, 
Trlntera. 1MH. hvo. pp. $2G. Trice $5. Sold by the author, Hath, Me. 

The render will derive from these pages much interesting information about 
n locality of peculiar historic Interest. The early voyagers who visited these 
shores are noticed, and a good account of the settlement of Bath and its vicinity 
is given. The book is partleularly full in biography, and portraits of many rep- 
resentative men of the place illustrate the work. Other engravings give views 
of buildings, ancient and modern. Shipbuilding is the principal industry of the 
place at the present time, and due attention is paid to it here. 

The Jfaking of the Ohio Valley States. By Samukl Adams Drake. With many 
Illustrations and Maps. New York: Charles Scribuer's Sons. 181)4. 1vol. 
It! mo.; pp. 2GD. Price, $1.50. 

The story of the white man's occupancy beyond the Alleghanies is told by 
Mr. Drake in three epochs, viz. : the conquest, the advance, the progress. Each 
epoch is subdivided into interesting descriptions of the natural features of the 
country, thrilling relations of the deeds of the pioneers, the permanent grasp 
of the armies, the resistance of the Indians, the struggle between the rivals; 
all tending to the rise and growth of the Great West!" It is the white man's 
story. The red man is seen, precisely as the natural features of the land are 
seen ; and serve to add variety to the illustration. The cuts of scenery, por- 



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96 Book Notices. [Jan. 

traits, buildings, curiosities and the maps arc excellent. We know of no work 
which so happily tells this history within moderate compass as this modest 
volume. Authorities are quoted and references given for those who desire to 
extend reading or study. 
By George A. Gordon, A.M., of Somerville, 3Iass. 

Diary of Anna Green Winslow, a Boston School Girl of 1771. By Alice Mouse 
Eaule. Boston and New York: Houghton, Mifiiin & Co. 12mo. pp. 121. 
Trice $1.25. 

Mrs. Earle of Brooklyn, N. Y., the editor of this work, is the author of " The 
Sabbath in Puritan New England," and " Customs and Fashions in Old New 
England," noticed in previous volumes of the Register. The " Boston school- 
girl" who kept this diary was a daughter of Joshua Winslow of Marshfleld 
and his wife Anna, daughter of Joseph Green of Boston. Her father was a 
descendant of John Winslow of the Mayflower, and her mother traced her an- 
cestry to Percival Green, concerning whom and his descendants the Hon. Samuel 
A. Green, M.D., contributed an article to the Register for April, 18(51, which 
was reprinted with additions. The diary extends from Nov. 1771, to May, 1772. 
It gives us glimpses of life in Boston just previous to the opening of the Revolu- 
tionary Avar. The editor has done her work thoroughly. In her " Forewords " 
she has given much matter relating to the diarist and her relatives. Her " Notes " 
at the end of the volume are filled with interesting facts concerning people men- 
tioned in the diary. The engravings Which embellish the volume truly illustrate 
it. They are a portrait of Miss Winslow from a miniature now owned by Miss 
Elizabeth C. Treat of Niagara Falls ; a fac-simile of a portion of the original 
diary, with her signature; a Wedding Party in Boston in 175G from tapestry 
now owned by the American Antiquarian Society; and portraits of General 
Joshua Winslow, Ebenezer Storer and Hannah Green Storer, the first from a 
miniature, and the others from portraits painted by Copley. There is also an 
engraving of a cut-paper picture executed by Mrs. Sarah Winslow Deming, 
aunt of the diarist. 

The book is a valuable contribution to the personal and public history of 
provincial Massachusetts. 

The History of Holden, Massachusetts, 1684-1894. By DaYid Foster Estes. 
Published by the Town. Worcester, Mass. : Press of C. F. Lawrence & Co. 
1894. 8vo. pp. X.+447. Price $3.50. 

On the 30th of November, 1840, the town of Holden celebrated its One Hun- 
dredth Anniversary. Samuel C. Damon, a native of the town and a member of 
Andover Theological Seminary, afterwards the Rev. Samuel C. Damon, D.D., 
of Honolulu (see Registkr, vol. 39, pp. 398), was invited to deliver an histori- 
cal address, which he did. The address was embodied in a History of Holden 
by him, published in 1841 in a volume of 154 pages. Dr. Damon's history has 
been incorporated in this volume. 

The present book does credit to the author, Mr. Estes, and to the town of 
Holden, at whose charge it has been published. The history of the town for 
over two hundred years is here narrated in an interesting manner. The volume 
is embellished with forty-two portraits and eight views, and contains also a plan 
of the town. It is well indexed. 

No town can spend money to better advantage than in preserving its annals 
in print. 

Record of my Ancestors. Bailey's Photo-Ancestral Record (with Supplement). 
Designed and Published by the Rev. Frederick W. Bailey, B.D. New 
Haven, Conn., and Worcester, Mass. Second Edition. Enlarged and Im- 
proved. 4to. (10 in. by 12£ in.). 

In our number for July last we noticed two recently published books for re- 
cording the ancestors of an individual. We then referred to other books for 
this purpose, and among them named the first edition of the book before us. 
Rev. Mr. Bailey has made some improvements on his book which will render it 
more useful. Besides the blanks for recording one's ancestors, provision is 
made for preserving photographs and for miscellaneous notes. 





















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1895.] 



Booh Notices. 97 



Biographical Review. This volume contains Biographical Sketches of Leading 
Citizens af Columbia County, New York. Boston : Biographical Review Com- 
pany. 1804. Quarto, pp. 003. Turkey moroceo, gilt edges. Price $15. 
Biographical Review. This volume contains Biographical Sketches of Leading 
Citizens of Broome County, New York. Boston : Biographical Review Com- 
pany. 181)4. Quarto, pp. 837. Turkey morocco, gilt edges. Price $15. 
This series of volumes, of winch the titles of two volumes are given above, is 
preserving much biography of the State of New York. The volumes are hand- 
somely printed on line white paper, and are illustrated with portraits engraved 
in a high style of the art. The biographies are carefully written, and the de- 
tails are fully given. The following extract from the preface to the first 
volume will apply to both: " The subjects Df these brief biographies have been 
selected from the world's busy workers — tillers of the soil, merchants, manu- 
facturers, tradesmen, journalists, members of the learned professions, civil en- 
gineers, and so forth, representative men and women of the country, useful 
and honored in their day and generation." We trust that the enterprise will be 
liberally patronized. 

Watertown Records, comprising the First and Second Books of Town Proceedings, 

with the Lands, Grants and Possessions; also the Proprietors' Book, and the 

First Book and Supplement of Births, Deaths and Marriages. Prepared for 

Publication by The Historical Society. Watertown, Mass.: Press of Fred 

G. Barker. IBM. 8vo. pp. vi.+lUl+li)9-f81. 
The. Farly Records of Dedham, Massachusetts, J 659-1 673, being Vol. IV. of the 

Printed Records of the 'Town. Edited by the Town Clerk, ])on Gleason Hill. 

Dedham, Mass.: Printed at the office of the Dedham Transcript. 1804. 8vo. 

pp. x. +304. 

We are glad to see the Early Records of the Ancient Town of Watertown in 
print in the volume before us. They have been printed at the expense of the 
town, and under the direction of a committee of the Watertown Historical So- 
ciety. The committee in an Introduction give a history of the publication and 
the services rendered by those who have aided in the work; and a description 
of the written records now preserved by the town. x 

The volume before us contains: 1, Record of Town Proceedings ; 2, Lands, 
I Grants and Possessions, including the Proprietors' Book; 3, Rec6rds of Births, 

Deaths and Marriages. Each of these parts is separately paged with separate 
Indexes* Kac-sliniles of some of the entries are given. Maps of portions of 
the town have been added from the Massachusetts Archives. The committee 
state that It has been their aim to "procure a copy verbatim et literatim of the 
original records. Nothing has been taken for granted. All doubtful passages 
have been placed In brackets, and editorial comments or additions have been 
enclosed In parentheses, an it li reference to authorities where necessary." Much 
pains has evidently been taken to reproduce the original record faithfully. The 
committee deserve credit for this. We hope editors of records of other towns 
will follow their example. 

Tlie fourth volume of the Dedham Records Is also before us. The previous 
volumes have all been noticed by us. Tho same care has been bestowed by Mr. 
Hill on this volume as he bestowed on them. 

Publications of the Rhode Island Historical Society. New Series. "Vol. II. No. 

3. October, 1804. Providence, R. 1. : Published quarterly by the Society.. 

Price §1 a year. Single copies 50 cents. 

With this number, the secretary of the Rhode Island Historical Society, Amos 
Perry, LL.D., takes the editorship of this serial. He shows that he has admir- 
able qualifications for the position. We have in this number some valuable 
Rhode Island manuscripts from the National Archives. They are literal copies 
of the originals preserved at Washington. Then follow communications from 
William D. Ely, on "Roger Williams's Key, Beanesvs. Barnes"; from Virginia 
Baker, " Glimpses of Ancient Sowams"; from Henry F. Richards, "The Great 
Gale of Sept. 23, 1815," by Mr. Lardner; and from John 0. Austin's "Genea- 
logical Notes" on several families. The number concludes with Genealogical 
Notes and Cullings. 

The matter here printed is of especial interest to Rhode Island people, and' 
the citizens of that State and natives of it residing in other parts of the Union 
should see that the periodical is liberally supported. 
vol. xlix. 8* 














































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98 Booh Notices. [Jan. 

Lincoln County Probate Records. Compiled by William D. Patterson. Port- 
land : Maine Ilistorienl Soeiety. 8vo. Published in monthly parts of 1G 
pages each, on the 15th of every month, commencing Nov. 15, 1893. Price 
25cts. a part. Twenty parts will make a volume, and a title, preface and 
index will be furnished. 

Eigfet numbers of this serial were noticed by us in July, 1894. Thirteen num- 
bers have now been issued, and are before us. They form a valuable addition 
to the local and family history of Maine. Mr. Patterson of Wiscasset, the 
editor of this w r ork, made a statement a year or two ago to the Maine Genealo- 
gical Society, relative to the probate records of Lincoln County. There are 
about 150 wills on the records of the county before the division. The records 
up to the incorporation of Kennebec County in 1799, are in eight volumes. 
There are many records of intestates, and some records of partitions of real 
estate. There are some wills that were not recorded as they were not allowed. 
There are some papers of the records missing, as it is probable that in early 
times the registers of probate kept their records in their own houses. Mr. 
Patterson is doing a good service in preserving in print the records now in the 
Lincoln County office, and we hope the missing records may be recovered and 
placed in their rightful depository. 

The publication is deserving of a libcrnl patronage. It contains matter of 
interest to others besides the citizens Of Maine. 

The. American Historical Register ; a Monthly Gazette of the Patriotic Hereditary 
Societies of the United States of America. Philadelphia: The Historical Pub- 
lishing Company, 120 South Gth St. 8vo. Price $3 a year. 
This magazine was commenced in September last, and the fourth or December 
number has reached us. The editor-in-chief is Charles H. Browning, the author 
of " Americans of Royal Descent." There are a number of associate editors in 
different parts of the country. Much interesting matter is contained in these 
monthly issues. They are illustrated with many fine engravings, some of which 
are in colors. 

Magazine of the Daughters of the Revolution. New York City: Published quar- 
terly at 64 Madison Avenue. 8vo., price $1 a year, single copies 30 cts. Vol. 
II. January to October, 1891. 

The first volume of this magazine was noticed by us in July last. The second 
is now completed. It contains a similar variety of matter relating to the order 
and interesting to its members. It is well printed, and illustrated by engravings. 

The Maine Historical Magazine. Edited by Joseph W. Porter. Bangor, Me. : 
C. 11. Glass & Co., Printers. Vol. IX., Nos. 7, 8 and 9, July, August and 
September, 1894. Price $2 a year. 

Hon. Mr. Porter's Historical Magazine has been noticed before by us, and 
our readers know that it is tilled with valuable historical matter relative to 
Maine. "We notice the announcement in this number, that though the work has 
been published at a loss, if " its friends will kindly interest themselves by pro- 
curing new subscribers it will be continued," otherwise it will not be published 
after the end of 1891. We trust that those who appreciate the work will exert 
themselves in its behalf, so that so useful a work may be continued. 

Rose Neighborhood Sketches, Wayne County, New York, with Glimpses of the 
Adjacent Towns, Butler, Wolcott, Huron, Sodus, Lyons and Savannah. By 
Alfred S. Roe. Published by the Author, Worcester, Mass. Royal 8vo. 
pp. xvi. -f 441. Price $3. 

Mr. Roc, the author of this work, a native of Rose, says in his Preface, " This 
volume represents summer vacation work for eight years. Born of ancestors 
who were among the very first to redeem Rose soil from the wilderness, I can- 
not remember the time When the story of early adventure and hardship was not 
heard. Grandparents and great-grandparents tilled my childish ears with 
aneedote and incident, so that when they had passed on it seemed fitting to give 
the narrative more permanent form than that of mere legend and tradition. 
This was the prompting to write for the Clyde Times in 188<J,t he lirsl of the 





















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1895.] Booh Notices. 99 

series, taking my native district No. 7. When that was ended, friends and 
relatives in the adjoining districts said, 'Yon must tell the story of Nos. 5 and 
G.' Accordingly they followed in successive issues of the Times." 

From these extracts and the title page; the reader "will have a good idea of 
the contents of the book. The author has made a valuable and readable volume. 
It is well printed, illustrated by engravings, and is well indexed. 

llie Crafts Family. A Genealogical and Biographical History of the Descendants 
of Griffin and Alice Crafts of Roxbury, Mass., 1630-1890. Compiled by 
James M. Crafts and William 1<\ Grafts. Northampton, Mass.: Gazette 
Printing Company, 1893. 8vo. pp. 803. To be had of William F. Crafts, 
1079 Tremont St., Boston. Price $7.50. 

Early Days in New England. Life and Times of Henry Burt of Springfield and 
Some of his Descendants, Genealogical and Biographical Mention of James and 
Bichard Burt of Taunton and Thomas Burt, M.B., of England. By Henry 
M. Hurt and Silas W. Burt. Springfield, Mass. : Clark W. Bryan Co., 
Printers. Trice $3.50. To be had of Henry M. Burt, Springfield, Mass. 

Tlie Genealogy of the Hitchcock Family who were descended from Matthias Hitch- 
cock of New Haven, Conn., and Luke Hitchcock of Wethersfield, Conn. Com- 
piled and published by Mrs. Edward Hitchcock, Sr. Arranged for the 
Tress by Rev. D.wight W. Marsh, D.D., Amherst, Mass. : Tress of Carpenter 
& Morehouse. 1'894. 8vo. pp. vii-f 555. Trice $5. 

A Genealogical Account of the Descendants of James Young, Merchant Burgess of 
Aberdeen, and Rachel Cruickshank his Wife, 1697-1893. With Notes as to 
Many of the Families with which they are connected. Aberdeen : Printed at 
the University Tress. 1894. lloyal ^vo. gilt top, pp. 204. 125 copies, pri- 
vately printed. 

1275-1894. History of the Trubee Family. By Harriet Trubee Garlick. 
Bridgeport, Conn. : Printed by Marigold Printing Company. 1894. Limited 
Edition. Trice, $5. To be obtained of S. M. Garlick, M.D., 31G State St., 
Bridgeport, Conn. 

Ralph Shrpard, l^tritan. By Ralph Hamilton Siiepard. Triufbd for Trivate 
Circulation. Dedham, Mass. : 1893. Royal 8vo. pp. 50. 

Gleanings fmm Barker liecords, A.D. 1271-1893. By AVilliam Thornton 
1'aickku, M.D., Groveland, Mass. Haverhill, Mass. : Tress of Chase Bro- 
thers. )S!U. WideSvo. pp. 51. 

Family Notes respecting the Bradley Family of Fairfield and our Descent there- 
from ; \rith Notes of Collaterid Ancestors on the Female Side. For the use of 
viy Children. Written in August, 1883. By Joseph T. Bradley. Edited 
ami published by his son, Charles Bradley. Newark, N. J.: Amzi Tear- 
son vt Co.-, Printers; IHiM. Royal 8vo. pp. 09. 

The Peine Family Record. 1687-1893. A New Edition. With Appendix. 
By E. W. West. New York: Bradctreet Press. 1894. Sm. 8vo. pp. 97. 

Genealogy of Bedford Old Families, xoith Biographical Notes. By Abram En- 
glish Brown. Bedford : 'Published by the Author. 1892. Royal 8vo. pp. 52. 

Family Record of James and Sarah Gibbs of Bristol, Mass. 

Bedigree of Odel. United States and Canada. 1639-1894. Six Lines of De- 
scent. Traced by Rufus KinCx, Esq., of Yonkers, N. Y. 1894. Tabular 
Pedigree, 25 inches by 3G in. 

Hooe-Barnes of Virginia and Maryland. (From *' Virginia Genealogies"). By 
Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, M. A. Wilkes-Barrc. 8vo. pp. 4. 

Dade of Virginia. (From " Virginia Genealogies.") By Rev. Horace Edwin 
Haydkn, M.A. Wilkes-Barrc. 8vo. pp. 3. 

Fov-ke. (From •» Virginia Genealogies,") By Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, 
M.A. Wilkcs-Barre. 8vo. pp. 4. 

Some Account of the Temple Family. By Temple Prime, Huntington, N. Y. 
Second Edition. New York. 1894. 8vo. pp. 111. 

Some Account of the Bowdoin Family. With Notices of Portage, Lynde, New- 
gate, Erving. By Temple Prime. Second Edition. New York. 1894. 8vo. 
pp. 32. 















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100 Booh Notices, [Jan. 

Descent of John Nelson and of his Children, with Notes on the Families of Taller 

and StOu/j/Uon. By Temple Prime. Second Edition. New York. 181)4. 

8vo. pp. (.SI. 
Family of John Savage of Middletown, Conn., 1652. By James Francis Sav- 

agk. Boston: David Clapp & Son, Printers. 1894. 8vo. pp. 2G. 
Hie Needham Branch of the Tolman Family. By Anna Maria (Tolman) Pick- 

ford. Dedham, Mass. 1804. 8vo. pp 29. 
History of the Shepard Family. By Chester Brown. Montpelier : Printed by 

the A runs and Patriot Co. 1894. 8vo. pp. 10. Published by the Author, 

East Hard wick, Vt. Price 15cts. 
Genealogy of Lewis B. Parsons. Oblong 8vo. 8 leaves. 
Sprayue Family Items. By Dwigiit H. Kelton, LL.D., of Montpelier, Vt. 

Oct. 20, 1894. 8vo. pp. 6. 100 copies printed. 
Historic Records of an Old Family. 1890. 

We continue in this number our quarterly notices of works relating to gene- 
alogy recently received. 

The Crafts Family, the first on our list, is an excellent specimen of books of 
this kind. It is carefully compiled, well arranged, handsomely printed on fine 
paper, well indexed, and well bound. " It has forty-one full page illustrations. 
It contains the family records of over eleven hundred families of the name of 
Crafts, and of probably as many more bearing other names." Particular atten- 
tion seems to have been paid to biography, the details of which are very full. 
The hook contains a Journal of the Siege of Louisburg from April 24th to Sept. 
5th, 1745, by Benjamin Craft; A Journal of the Siege of Boston, from June 15th 
to Nov. 16th, 1775, by Lieut. Benjamin Crafts; and a Journal of Burgoyne's Sur- 
render, kept from Sept. 9th to December 2d, 1777, by Major Eleazer Craft. 
Much other matter of historic interest appears in this book, making it of value 
to others besides those of the name. 

The next volume, on the Life and Times of Henry Burt of Springfield, and 
some of his Descendants, is an ably compiled work, and contains much matter 
that will interest all New Englandcrs. To those of the name or blood it is in- 
valuable. The book is illustrated with portraits, maps and autqgraphs. It is 
well indexed. Much labor has evidently been spent in compiling the book, 
which makes over six hundred pages. It is well printed and bound. 

The Hitchcock Family, by Mrs. Hitchcock, is another work of a high order of 
excellence. Matthias Hitchcock, the emigrant ancestor, came from England at 
the age of twenty-five, in the spring of 1G35, in the Susan and Ellen (Register, 
xiv., 309), and settled in "Watertown, Mass. A few years later he removed to 
New Haven Colony, where he died Nov. 16, 1GG9. Mrs. Hitchcock has suc- 
ceeded in gathering a very satisfactory record of his descendants, and those of 
Luke Hitchcock of YVetherslleld, Ct. "The aim of this book" she says in the 
Introduction, " has been to preserve the records of a portion of the Hitchcock 
family, as far as they could be secured from town and church records, records 
of Probate Courts and Registries of Deeds, and from family records," a large 
number of which have been personally examined. In arranging the work she 
has been aided by Rev. Dr. Marsh of Amherst. The book is well printed, and 
has a very full index. It is handsomely bound, and illustrated by many fine 
portraits. 

The next book, the Descendants of James Young of Aberdeen, Scotland, is 
by Lieut. -Col. William Johnston, Brigade Surgeon of the Army Medical Staff 
Of Newton Dee, Murlie, Aberdeenshire. In 18(11, the late Mr. Alexander Johns- 
ton printed at Aberdeen for private circulation, 250 copies of "A Short Memoir 
of James Young, Merchant Burgess of Aberdeen and Itachel Cruickshank his 
spouse, and of their descendants," &c., in which the descendants were brought 
down to 18(50. The work before us has also been printed for private circula- 
tion. Lieut. -Col. Johnston informs us in his Preface, that it is " an attempt to 
bring the account down to the end of 1893." The book gives much genealogical 
and biographical matter relating to many distinguished Scottish families and 
individuals. The book Is handsomely printed on laid paper, and is well Indexed. 

The Trubec Family, by Mrs. (larllck, Is a book that in every way reflects 
credit on the author. It makes a very handsome volume, and Is evidently a 



1805.] Booh Notices, 101 

work on which much labor lias been expended to make it accurate and full. 
'•Bfcnlizing the fact," the author says in her introduction, "that unless the 
members of a family arc suftlciently interested in their past record to preserve 
it in writing, it will be forgotten and lost by the passing away of generation 
after generation, I have written for the beneiit of ourselves and descendants 
a history of our family, commencing with our Hebrew ancestor, Andris Trubee 
of Holland." The volume is embellished by many line portraits and other en- 
gravings. 

The next volume, " Kalph Shepard, Puritan," by the late Mr. Shepard of New 
Haven, N. Y., is an elegantly printed book, the edition of which is limited to 
fifty numbered and signed copies. The author's dedication is " To my Father, 
Sidney Shepard, Esquire, a lineal descendant of Kalph Shepard, in the sixth 
generation, 1 lovingly inscribe this Book." The book contains all that could be 
gathered relative to the author's emigrant ancestor who came to New England 
in 1035. lie died Aug. 20, 1G93, aged 90. An engraving of his gravestone at 
Maiden is given. Besides the account of Ralph Shepard, two generations of his 
descendants are found here. The book is a worthy memorial of a worthy 
ancestor. 

Dr. Parker's Gleanings from Parker Records contains gleanings concerning 
various persons of the name in England and America, many of whom have won 
distinction. The book is printed in an elegant manner, and is illustrated with 
tine engravings. 

The Family Notes by the late Hon. Joseph P. Bradley, a Justice of the United 
States Supreme Court, are devoted to the descendants of Francis Bradley, who 
settled in Fairlield, Conn., in 1GG0. They were written for the benefit of his 
children, and have been edited aud published by his son. Much historical as 
well as genealogical matter is here preserved. The book makes a handsome 
Volume. It shows great research. 

The Peirce Family Record is by Edward W. West, Esq., of Brooklyn, N. Y. , 
who in 18G4 published a thin pamphlet under the same title, and in 18G9 issued 
several pages of additions and corrections. These were noticed in the Register 
for October, 1«72. The present work is much enlarged and improved. It has 
an Appendix containing accounts of some related families, namely: Hardy, 
Grafton, Gardener, Dawes, Lathrop, Coulis, Russell, Haswell, Gray, Chipman, 
Blanchard, Holland, May, West, Wyman, Cobia, etc. The book is well pre- 
pared, ami makes a handsome volume. 

Mr. Hmwn's book on the Old Families of Bedford, Massachusetts, is a work 
of much merit, and is commended to those who trace their ancestry to that 
town. It is illustrated by engravings. 

The Gibhs Family Record is a handsome pamphlet from the University Press. 
It gives the descendants of James Gibbs of Bristol, Massachusetts Bay, who is 
mipp.ised to be from Bristol, lCngland. The biographies are full ami precise. 

The Odell pedigree is by Mr. King of Yonkers, N. Y,, who has contributed 
many articles to the Hkc.istku. lie finds the name spelled Wadehelle, Wadhull, 
de Wahid, Wodhull, Woodhull, Wodell, Odell, Odill, Odle, etc. The emigrant 
ancestor of the family here recorded was William Odell, an early settler of Con- 
cord, Mass., who, Mr. King thinks, came with Rev. Peter Bulkeley, or about 
that time. The pedigree is carefully compiled. 

The next three works, Hooe-Barues, Dade and Fowke, are by the careful 
genealogist, Rev. Mr. Hayden of Wilkcs-Barre, Pa., whose " Virginia Genealo- 
gies " were noticed by us in January, 1892. 

The next three works are by Lieut. Temple Prime, U. S. A., Huntington, 
N. Y. They are second editions of works previously published. They all re- 
late to families of high repute in New England history. The works are care- 
fully compiled, and printed in a handsome manner. They are illustrated by 
engravings. The Nelson book contains a portrait by Smibert of the hero of 
Samuei Adams Drake's novel, " Captain Nelson." (See Register, vol. 33, p. 
2G1.) 

The Family of John Savage is a reprint from the Register for July last, with 
very large additions. One of the appended articles gives a list of the Revolu- 
tionary soldiers of the family, their rank and service. The two brothers, 
Savage, of Lowell, who compile this monograph on their family history in 



102 Jleccnt Publications. [Jan. 

America, have devoted a large amount of diligent and intelligent research to Its 
accomplishment. We understand that its distribution is to be private, but we 
apprehend that genealogists desiring copies could likely be accommodated by 
early application. 

The Needham Branch of the Tolman Family, by Mrs. Pickford, gives a line 
of the Tolman family not carried out in the article on the Tolmans in the Reg- 
ister for July, 18G0. It makes a handsome pamphlet. 

Mr. Brown's "History of the Shepard Family" furnishes details of a Ver- 
mont family of this name, of which little has previously been preserved in 
print. The author deserves credit for his work. 

The Parsons Genealogy is by Gen. Lewis B. Parsons of Flora, Clay county, 
Illinois, who traces his ancestry to Joseph Parsons of Springfield, Mass., re- 
lating to whom and his descendants an article will be found in the REGISTEB for 
July, 1847. Appended is an article giving the author's ancestry in his maternal 
line — Hoar. 

The Sprague pamphlet gives the ancestry from that family of the author, 
Dwight II. Kelton, LL.D., of Montpelier, Vt., captain in the United States 
Army. He is the author of " Annals of Fort Mackenac," etc. 

The " Historic Records of an Old Family" is by Rear Adm. Francis Ashbury 
Roe, U. S. N. The " Old Family" is that of Roe, which the author traces to 
Scandinavia at an early date. Much interesting matter is preserved in this 
pamphlet. 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS, 

Presented to the New-England Historici Genealogical Society from August 1, 

to December 1, 1891. ^ 

1. Ptiblications written or edited by Members of the Society. 

Corporations in the Days of the Colony. By Andrew McFarland Davis. Re- 
printed from the Publications of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. Cambridge. 
1894, 8vo.pp.34. 

The Inaugural Addresses of the Mayors of Boston. Vol I., 1822-1851. Published 
by the City Registrar. Boston. 1894. 8vo. pp. 415. 

Record of the Soldiers, Sailors and Marines who served the United States of Amer- 
ica in the War of the Rebellion and Previous Wars, Buried in the City of Ports- 
mouth, N. II., and the Neighboring Towns of Greenland, Newcastle, Newington and 
Rye. By Joseph Foster. Portsmouth, N. H. 1893. 8vo. pp. 76. 

Remarks on some rare German Prints of New York and Quebec, and on Contri- 
butions in the year 1781 by the Churches of Massachusetts to the Distressed Inhabi- 
tants of South Carolina and Georgia. By Samuel A. Green, M.D. [Boston, 1894.] 
8vo. pp. 7. 

Jonathan Holman, a Revolutionary Colonel. By John C. Crane. Worcester. 
1894. 8vo. pp. 19. 

The Crafts Family. By James M. and William F. Crafts. Northampton. 1893. 
8vo. pp. 803. 

The Early Records of the Town of Dedham. 1659-1673. Edited by Don Gleason 
Hill. Dedham. 1891. 8vo. pp. x.-f304. 

The Public Records of the State of Connecticut. From October, 1776, to February, 
1778, inclusive. By Charles J. Hoadly, LL.D. Hartford. 1891. 8vo. pp. iv.-f 653. 

Maps of the Street-lines of Boston, made for the Selectmen in 1819 and 1820. By 
John Groves Hales. Published by the City Registrar. Boston. 1894. 

Report of the Class Secretary of the Class of 1875, Bowdoin College. [By Myles 
Standish, M.D.] Boston. 1894. 12mo. pp. 43. 

The Present Status of Pre-Columbian Discovery of America by Norsemen. By 
Hon. James Phinney Baxter. Washington. 1894. 8vo. pp. 10. 

Rev. Jacob Green of Hanover, N. J., as an Author, Statesman and Putriot. By 
liev. Joseph F. Tuttle, D.D. Crawfordsville, Ind. [1894.] 8vo. pp. 55. 












: 















1895.] Recent Publications. 103 

IT. Other Publications. 

Catalogue of Westminster College. Fulton, Missouri. 1894. 8vo. pp. 44. 

The Story of the City Hull Commission, including the Exercises at the Laying of 
the Comer Stones and the Dedication of the City Hull and Memorial Hall. Edited 
by Prentiss Webster. Lowell. 1894. 8vo. pp. 233. 

Minutes of the General Association of the Congregational and Presbyterian Churches 
of New Hampshire. Vol. VI. Concord. 1894. 8vo. 

Third Report of the Record Commissioners relative to the Early Town Records. 
Providence. 1893. 4to. pp. 8. 

Proceedings of the Trustees of the Peaboay Education Fund. Cambridge. 1894. 
8vo. pp. 62. 

The First Houses of Pound Brook. By Rev. T. E. Davis. Bound Brook, N. J. 

1893. 4 to. pp. 35. 
Third Annual Report of the Trustees of Public Reservations. Boston. 1893. 

8vo. pp. 63. 

Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 1893. Part II. Boston. 

1894. 8vb, 
The Struggle for Freedom in Kansas. By Thomas Ewing. Reprinted from the 

Cosmopolitan Magazine, 1894. 4to. 

Historical Society Newbergh Bay and the Highlands. Newbergh, N. Y. 1894. 
4to. pp. 60. 

Proceedings of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science, Session of 1892-3. Halifax, 
N. S. 1893. 8vo. 

Proceeeings and Collections of the Nebraska State Historical Society. Lincoln, 
Neb. 1894. 8vo. pp. 64. 

The Honorable Elijah Leonard. A Memoir. London, Ont. 8vo. pp. 51. 

The History of Holdcn, Mass., 1684-1894. By David Foster Estes. Worcester. 
1894. 8vo. pp. X.+446. 

Souvenir of Charlestown and Bunker Hill Monument. Charlestown. 1894. 4to. 
pp. 86. 

The Unveiling of the Columbus Statue, New York, May, 1894. New York. 1894. 
4to. pp. 30. 

Celebration of the One Hundred and Twenty-fifth Anniversary of St. Andrew's 
Royal Arch Chapter, 1769-1894. Boston. 1891. 8vo. pp. 145. 

Indianland and Wonderland. By Olin D. Wheeler. 8vo. pp. 105. 

Letters from Alaska. By Horace Briggs, Ph.D. Buffalo. 1889. ' 12mo. pp. 87. 

Twentv-seventh Annual Report of the Peabody Institute of the Citv of Baltimore. 
Baltimore, 1891. 8vo. pp. .01. 

Thirtieth Report of the Trustees of the Boston City Hospital. Boston. 1894. 
8vo. pp. 167. 

Constitution and Records of the Claim Association of Johnson County, Iowa. By 
Benjamin F. Shambaugh, A.M. Iowa City. 1894. 8vo. pp. 196. 

Proceedings and Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada. Vol. XI. Ottawa. 
18'J4. 4 to. pp. 153. 

The Medical Register of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. John Shrady, 
M.D., Editor. Vol. XXXII. New York. 1894. 16mo. pp. clxxi.-f 261. 

A Partial Catalogue of the Publications of the Essex Institute. Salem. 1894. 
16 mo. pp. 28. 

Town Histories and Genealogies in the Library of the Essex Institute. Salem. 
1893. pp. 30. 

Acts and Resolves of Massachusetts, 1894. Boston. 1891. 8vo. pp. 1094. 

The Fones Record. Vol.1. By James N. Arnold. Providence. 18!)4. 8vo.pp. 199. 

Centennial Celebration of the Incorporation of Pittsburg. 8vo. pp. 50. 

Specimen Pages of a Pythian History of New Hampshire. By Charles B. Spofford. 
Manchester, N. H. 1894. 8yo.pp.ll, 

The Revolutionary Soldiers of Claremont, N. IF. By Charles B. Spofford. Clare- 
mont. 1894. 8vo. pp. 20. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., as it is. 1894. 

General Joseph Martin and the War of the Revolution in the West. By Prof. 
Stephen H. Weeks. Washington. 1804. 8vo. pp. 71. 

The Archives of Harvard College. By Justin Winsor. Worcester. 8vo. pp x 4. 

Watertown Records. Comprising the First and Second Books of Town Proceed- 
ings, with the Land Grants and Possessions; also the Proprietors' Book and the First 
Book and Supplement of Births, Deaths and Marriages. Watertown, Mass. 1894. 
8vo. pp. vi.-f-161 -}- 199-J-81. 



104 



Deaths, 



y 



[Jan. 



The Enrly Records of the Town of Providence. Vol. VI. Providence. 1894. 
4to. pp. vi.4-328. 

Hillsborough. Address at Hillsborough Bridge on the Field Day of the New 
Hampshire Historical Society, October 3, 1893. By Amos Hadley, Ph.D. Concord. 
1894. 8vo. pp. 17. 



DEATHS. 



Nathan Gillette Pond, Esq., born in 
New York, May 31, 1832: married in 
Milford, Conn., November 11, 1856; 
died in Milford, Conn., July 29, 1894. 
Third in descent from Charles Pond, 
of Revolutionary fame. Seventh in 
descent from Theophilus Eaton, first 
Governor of New Haven Colony. Sixth 
in descent from Sir Charles Hobby, 
Colonel of Massachusetts regiment un- 
der General Nicholson, in the Port 
Royal Expedition, 1710, was knighted 
July 9, 1705, "for good service done 
the Crown in New England." Sixth in 
descent from Capt. John Miles, who 
served under Major Robert Treat in the 
great swam]) light. He was the son of 
Charles Hobby and Martha Gillette 
Pond. At the age of 21 he went into 
business in New York city; but a 
varied success led him to a country life, 
and for years he was a breeder of thor- 
oughbred cattle — short horns and Jer- 
seys — whose pedigrees he searched as 
carefully as he did in later years those 
of his fellow-men. He conceived the 
idea of the "Memorial Bridge" built 
in Milford, Conn., over the Wepownge, 
at the place where the settlers first 
crossed on their entry into the land of 
their new homes. The bridge was dedi- 
cated in 18S9, on the 250th anniversary 
of the settlement of the town, and is a 
fitting monument to one who labored 
so long and faithfully to accomplish it. 
The "Taylor Library" now being 
built is largely due to Mr. Pond's efforts 
in behalf of Milford. The ancestral 
tablets he prepared are marvels of com- 
pleteness, and are invaluable to their 
fortunate possessors. His books, "The 
Old Tombstones of Milford" and "Ye 
Story of ye Memorial," are of great in- 
terest to antiquarians as well as to 
descendants of the settlers of New 
Haven colony. 

Mr. Pond married in 1856 Sophia M. 
Mooney (of Revolutionary and colonial 
ancestry in New Hampshire), by whom 
he had eight children. Owing to his \ 
peculiar belief regarding life and death;, 
no clergyman was in official attendance 
at his funeral, although many of that 



profession, warm and lifelong friends, 
were present. In accordance with an 
oft- repeated request, the exercises were 
conducted by the Hon. George M. Gunn, 
a neighbor, friend, and a fellow society 
man. 

Mr. Pond was a charter member of 
both New York and Connecticut Socie- 
ties of Colonial Wars ; and has been 
greatly instrumental in reviving the 
Connecticut " Society of Cincinnati." 
In regard to Mr. Pond's connection 
Avith the Society of the Cincinnati, I 
quote trom a letter received since writ- 
ing the above : 

" Mr. Pond wns associated with Gen. 
D wight Morris, Hon. A. W. Merwin, 
Rev. A. N. Lewis, and others, in re- 
viving the disbanded Society of the 
Cincinnati in Connecticut from the 
initiatory movement in 1888 to its 
restoration by the General Society in 
1893. He was indefatigable in laboring 
for the desired result. His genealogical 
skill rendered his feervices peculiarly 
valuable. The Society could have 
spared any of its members better than 
Mr. Pond. He was treasurer of the 
Society, and a member of the executive 
committee of the General Society. Mr. 
Pond will be succeeded by his eldest 
son, Charles Hobby Pond, of New York 
city." 

James Bartlett Shapleigii, Esq., one of 
the best known citizens of Somers worth, 
N. H., died in that city August 2, 1894. 
He was a lineal descendant of Alexan- 
der Shapleigh the emigrant ancestor, 
who came to this country from Devon- 
shire, England, in 1635, and settled in 
Kittery, and son of Samuel Shapleigh, 
one of the earliest settlers in Lebanon, 
Me. He was born in that town Feb- 
ruary 20, 1805, and was consequently 
at the time of his death 89 years, 5 
months and 14 days of age. Mr. Shap- 
leigh retained his mental and physical 
powers unimpaired to near the close of 
life ; and during his long and active life 
he never had occasion to require the 
services of a physician until within a 
few days of his death. 















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1805.] h Genealogical Gleanings in England. 105 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

By Henky F. Waters, A.M. 
[Continued from Vol. xlviii., page 51G.] 

Apollo Playne of Preston, Suffolk, gentleman, 4 September 1 601, 
proved 20 November 16*02. My son William Plaine, married to a daughter 

of Robert of Koughaunam, Suffolk, Esq. Mr. Thomas Willis 

minister of Preston. Margaret my wife and William my son to be execu- 
tors. To the pool* of Lavenham forty shillings so that, they trouble me not 
at the day of my burial. My executors to pay Amye Dickens, at her full 
age of one and twenty years, a hundred pounds and to the rest of the 
children of my daughter Dickens, namely, George, Margaret and Bryant, 
a hundred pounds to be evenly or equally distributed amongst them at their 
full age; and if they die before they come to those years then I will my 
daughter, their mother, shall have their portion, over living; but if she die, 
my executors. I give my son Dickens his debts due at my death, so he 
claim no other. Ilollinshead's Dictionaries, which I paid forty shillings for, 
I bequeath to my cousin John Gurdon Esq., praying him my son may have 
" Chawcer and Maister Lamberte's Perambulacoii of Kent," making him 
overseer of my will. Montague, 74. 

Anthony Diiury of Besthorpe, Norfolk, Esq. 20 June 1G1G, proved 9 
November 1G1G. My body to be buried in the South Aisle of the parish 
chureh of Besthorpe and my grave to be covered with the marble stone at 
my porch door, with a superscription 1 in brass and two escutchions of brass 
with my arms and my two wives' arms engraven thereon. > To my wife 
Anne (among other things) the ambling gelding which I bought of one 
Buckeuham and the household stuff of mine remaining in my son Sir 
Anthony Drury 's house in Besthorpe. Sundry hangings &c. in my parlor at 
my manor of Cufson's to my said son Sir Anthony. Sundry household stuff 
in my houses at Weston, Norfolk, to my son William. My daughter Bur- 
inan and my grandchild Anne Burma!) (at eighteen). My daughter Ivooke- 
wood. My grandchild Bridget KooUewood (at eighteen). Other of her 
children. My eldest son's daughters, vV Anne, Bridget, Elizabeth, Susan 
and Dorothy, at twenty or marriage. My daughter Elizabeth Ilarborne 
and her children. My son Pleasant's children, viz 1 Thomas, William, Anne 
and Dorothy, at eighteen. To my grandchild William Drury my chain of 
gold, to be delivered to him at his full age of one and twenty years, and 
after my decease the said chain to be delivered to Dame Bridgett Drury 
my daughter to have the custody and use thereof. To my said daughter 
my gold ring with my arms thereupon. To my grandchild Anthony Drury 
all my lands in Lynge which I bought of Mr. Dennye. My grandchild 
Robert Drury. My sister Chamberlaine. My loving cousin Mr. Arch- 
deacon Stokes. To wife Anne, for life, all that chief messuage &c. wherein 
my eldest son lately dwelt, called Gyles, whereof by deed indented dated 18 
August 1-1 KHz/: I did eufeoffe Nicholas Garnois and William Brampton 
Esquires and Thomas Brampton gen 1 to certain uses &e. Provisions for 
deseent of real estate. Son Sir Anthony Drury to be executor and if ho 
shall not, within three months next after my decease, lawfully prove this 

VOL. XL IX. 10 



106 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

my last will and testament according to the due course of the Ecclesiastical 
laws of this Realm then all my gifts and devises of goods &c. to him shall 
cease ami be utterly void and I give the same to my son William whom I 
make executor in his place. And lastly I do desire my loving brother 
Nicholas Garneis Esq. and my loving sons in law William Ilarborne Esq. 
and Mr. Doctor Burman to be supervisors. And I do give and bequeath 
unto my loving cousin John Gulden Esq., according to a loving and kind 
agreement between him and me, if he be living at the time of my decease, 
one gelding or colt or else forty shillings in lieu thereof, desiring him to 
take my small remembrance in good part. And unto my said brother 
Garneis and my sons William Ilarborne and Doctor Burman and to my son 
William Drury and to my son Rookewood and to my grandchild William 
Drury and to my loving kinsman and godson Mr. Thomas Drury and to my 
loving cousin Thomas Brampton Esq. I give, to each of them, a mourning 
gown. And to the rest of my friends or kin that my executor shall please 
to bestow cloaks upon I will that my nephew Raphe Chamberlain and my 
brother Constable shall have each of them one. And so an end of this my 
last will and testament &c. 

Ro: Constable and William Rookewood two of the witnesses. Proved 
by Sir Anthony Drury, knight. Cope, 100. 

John Cumxw of Assington, Suffolk, Esq. G December 1G21, proved 10 
October 1623. In former will had made my son Brampton (Guidon) ex- 
ecutor. I have, upon very just occasions which I have imparted unto some 
of our indifferent friends, changed my purpose therein. To my grandchild 
John G union, eldest son of my said son Brampton Gurdon by his first wife, 
all my lease or farm lands, advowsons, tythes &c. in Assington, parcel of 
the late Priory of Hatfield Peverell, Essex, which I did purchase of Thomas 
Winterflood gei^, lands which I did purchase of Sir Edwin Riche, knight, 
the messutige or farm house wherein one Thomas French doth now inhabit, 
called Garland's, and lands belonging &c, which I did lately purchase of 
Sir William Waldgrave, knight, the elder, situate in Assington, lands which 
I bought of the children of Edward llamond, now in the occupation of John 
ITamond fand a lot of other lands &c. described) ; and my will, intent and 
desire is, which I would earnestly entreat my son Brampton Gurdon, even 
as he would have the love and favor of Almighty God, that he would per- 
mit and suffer all those manors, lands and tenements &c. to go, remain and 
be in such manner and form and to such person or persons &c. and for such 
uses as are expressed &c. in certain indentures tripartite made between me 
the said John Gurdon and Amye my wife on the first part, Elizabeth 
Barret, widow, Sir Drue Drurye, knight, and others of the second part and 
the said Brampton Gurdon my son on the third part, bearing date 2 Feb- 
ruary 3 Q Eliz: Reference to an instrument bearing date 25 June 1 (>0G, 
made by the said Brampton Gurdon upon or a little before his intermarriage 
with a second wife &c. To my grandchild Robert Gurdon, brother unto 
my said grandchild John Gurdon of the whole blood, messuages &c. in 
Letton, Cranworth and Shipdam &c, in Norfolk, with remainder to Edward 
Guidon, whole brother unto the said Robert. Sundry lands ,&c. to said 
grandson Edward Gurdon. To my cousin William Playne of Lavenham, 
Suffolk, sen', thirty pounds and to his mother Margaret Playne, widow, 
forty shillings to make her a ring. To my grandchild Brampton whom my 
said son had by his second wife, Muriell the daughter of Martin Sydley 
Esq. deceased, certain household stuff at Letton, at his age of four and 






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1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 107 

twenty or day of marriage. To the said Muriell, the now wife of my said son, 
twenty pounds to buy her a gown. To the rest of my son Brampton Guidon's 
children hy the said Muriell (.excepting Edmund) twenty pounds apiece at 
their several ages of twenty years. Certain household stuff conveyed to Wen- 
ham. Gifts to James Springet and to Alice his wife, before Alice Somerland, 
my late servants. Other servants. I make the aforenamed John Gurdon 
my grandchild sole executor and give and bequeath unto hi in the overplus 
of my money &c., and I nominate and appoint Sir Henry Mildmaye, knight, 
to be supervisor, to whom ten pounds in money and my best gelding or 
horse, at his own choice. Also I do appoint as a thing by me especially de- 
sired that my said grandchild John Gurdon will make some especial monu- 
ment or remembrance in Assington Church, not only of myself but of my 
father, mother and wife, being his grandmother, such as he in his discretion 
shall think meet and fit for our estate, condition and calling as we lived in 
this world. I give unto Kdmunde Gurdon my grandchild the copyhold in 
Mil ford, to be surrendered to his use, and ten pounds also for to pay his 
line ami charges of court. 

John Appleton one of the witnesses. Proved by John Gurdon the 
grandson. Swann, d\h 

Sir Calthorpe Parker of Erwarton, Suffolk, knight, 31 August 1 G 1 8 , 
proved 2G January 1 G 18. I give and bequeath unto Dame Mercye, my now 
wife, my capital messuage or manor house of my manor of Erwarton, with 
the orchards, gardens, mills, dovehouses &c. to have and to hold until my 
eldest son shall accomplish his full age of one and twenty years. The 
manor of Gaynes and other estate to be in the charge of the executors, a 
portion of the rent to be employed for the benefit of the younger children. 
The three hundred pounds paid to Sir Stephen Soame to be employed for 
me in the East Indian Company I give, with the profits arising of the said 
Adventure, unto my daughter Anne Parker, to be paid at her day of mar- 
riage or age of one and twenty years. Other bequests to daughters Anne 
and Mary Parker. To my sister Dame Katherine Cornwallis fifty pounds. 

I do name and appoint my assured loving brothers in law Nathaniel 
Barnardislon Esquire, Thomas Soame of London Esquire and my trusty 

!aud assured friends, William Cage of Ipswich, Suffolk, gentlemen, and John 
GuBelpy of Huruham Thorpe, Norfolk, yeoman, my true and lawful execu- 
tors. I do give and bequeath unto Dame Mercye my wife my capital and 
new built messuage in Great Wenha'u:, Suffolk, and lands, meadows, pas- 
tures and fennes in said town of Great Wenhara or Capell to have and to 
hold during her natural life. And after her decease I give them to Stephen 
Parker my second son and to his heirs forever. Parker, 1. 

I 

Damk Mercie Parker of Great Wenham, Suffolk, widow, 2 July 1G3G, 
proved 9 December 1G3G. To Henry Parker my second sou those lands, 
messuages &c. which I bought of Richard Daye, situate in Capell or 
elsewhere in said county. To my son Nathaniel Parker that hundred 
pounds which is in the hands of my cousin Henry Austin, and forty pounds 
more to buy him a chamber. 1 give to my son Thomas Parker and his 
heirs all those lands, which I bought of James Hopkins late minister of 
Great Wenham, situate and lying in Capel <&m. 1 give to my daughter 
Saltinstall and my daughter Gurdon my pair of gold bracelets, viz 1 to each 
of them one bracelet. 1 give to my said two daughters all my childbed linen 
to be equally divided betwixt them. Also I give six silver plate trenchers to 









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108 Genealogical Gleanings in England, [Jan. 

my daughter Sultenstall. And my meaning is tliey shall afterwards go to 
such children as she shall appoint or think fit. A similar bequest to daugh- 
ter Gurdon. To tny son, Sir Philip, a dozen silver plate trenchers. The 
rest of tny plate &c. to my three younger sons. To my daughter Parker 
my coach and my red and green quilt. All my other household stuff to 
my son Sir Philip. To John Saltenstall my grandchild fifty pounds to be 
employed to his use, and that, with the profits arising, to he paid him at his 
age of one and twenty years. To my hrothers Sir William, Sir Stephen 
and Mr. Thomas Somes, Sir John Wentworthe, Mr. John Gurdon my son 
in law, my sister Wentworlh and my sister Barnardiston, to each of them a 
ring of the value of ten pounds. I gWe to Sir Richard Saltinstall a ring of 
the value of forty pounds. To the poor of Great Wenham forty shillings. 
To the poor of Thurrington forty shillings, To the poor of Weekes in 
Essex forty shillings. Certain servants and others. All the rest of my 
lands &c. to be equally divided amongst my three younger sons, Henry, 
Nathaniel and Thomas, whom I constitute &c. executors. 

Proved by Henry Parker, power reserved to grant letters to Nathaniel 
and Thomas Parker the other executors named. Pile, 12'3. 

John Ciiopfyne fifth son of Francis Choppyne of Coddenham, Suffolk, 
gent f ' deceased, will made 17 December 1G44, proved 8 January 1647. My 
cousin Judith Choppyne. My cousin John Southwell Esq. My dear and 
loving mother Mrs. Dorothy Dove. Richard Tallemach of Coddenham, 
yeoman. My beloved nephew William Harrison, the son and only son of 
my late dear and loving sister, and my only sister, Dorothy Choppyne, the 
wife of William Harrison gen 1 . My beloved niece and god daughter Anne 
Choppyne, second daughter of my late dear brother Tellemache Choppyne 
gen 1 deceased. My beloved niece Frances Choppyne, eldest' daughter of 
my said brother. My beloved nephew John Choppyne, t\\e youngest son 
of my said brother, unto whom the Lady Susan Crane, in performance of 
my cousin Sir Robert Crane's promise, hath given the sum of ten pounds 
per annum, issuing out of the farm where I now dwell, for thirteen years, 
whereof there is two years passed. My beloved nephew Robert Choppyne, 
eldest son and heir of my said brother. All these nephews and nieces at 
one and twenty or days of marriage. Now my humble bequest is that my 
loving friends and kinsmen John Gurdon Esq., one of the members of the 
House of Commons, Francis Paeon Esq., Counsellor at Law, and Matthias 
Candler als Gillet, minister of God's word at Coddenham aforesaid, will 
take care of the tuition and education of my said brother Tallemach Chop- 
pyne his four children and guardians for my said nephew Robert Choppyne 
during his and their minorities, of whose tender care 1 have had experience 
and am fully persuaded that they will to the uttermost of their endeavors 
give my said brother's four children both pious, religious and virtuous edu- 
cation, which will be more precious in God\s eye than anything I can leave 
them. And I appoint my said loving kinsman John Gurdon Esq., Francis 
Bacon Esq. and Matthias Candler als Gillet, clerk, to be my executors. 

Essex, 11. 

P>ijampton Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq., 19 October 1647, with 
a codicil dated 1 February 1648, proved 16 .May 1650. My copyhold lands 
and tenements &c. in Great Wenham, East Bergholt, Roydon &c. in the 
Co. of Suffolk I bequeath to my eldest sou John Gurdon &e. My copy- 
hold lands and tenements holden of the manor of Shipdam and lying or 

\ 












i 






180").] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 109 

being in Shipdam and Letton, or in towns near adjoining, in the Co. of 
Norfolk., 1 give and bequeath unto my son Brampton Gurdon &c. I give 
and bequeath unto Merriell my dearly beloved wife my best coaeh and five 
horses, with all the harness and furniture belonging unto it, and all my 
plate marked with Sidleye's and Knevitt's eoats, or either of them, one 
deep silver bason, one silver sugar box, a silver chaffing dish, three great 
and three lesser silver drinking bowls, two broad silver bowls, a silver foot 
with a screw, six silver plates with Gurdon's and Sidlye's eoats, six silver 
saucers, a candle cup with a cover, a little silver tankard, four silver por- 
ringers, four trencher salts, fifteen silver spoons and the bell salt. To said 
wife (a lot of furniture and household stuff, including) a livery cupboard 
with a drawer, a high Turkey wrought chair and a little Turkey wrought 
chair, high stools and high chairs &c., napkins and linen marked B. G. M. 
and G. and M. G., the chaffer bought whilst I lived at Greeneford, one 
barrell churn &c. As for the pewter my will is that all the pewter stamped 
or marked with Bannotl's (Barrett's?) and Litton's arms do go to my 
executor, my son John Gurdon, and the residue of the pewter bo equally 
divided betwixt my said son and my wife. To my son Brampton Gurdon 
all the furniture and household stuff in his chamber and also one hundred 
pounds in lieu of a gift given unto him by mother Sedley (and also certain 
armor). To James Gurdon, the son of my son Robert, one hundred pounds 
to be disposed of for his best advantage by binding him out apprentice, or 
otherwise. To my daughter Mildm^.y one little gilt bowl and twenty 
pounds in money. My sou John's wife. My son Hill and his wife. 

Item, I give to my son Saltonstall fifty pounds, and to his wife fifty 
pounds, to be paid within twelve months after my decease. My son ^Robert's 
wife. My son Brampton's wife. My nephews Nathaniel and Francis 
Bacon. Mr. Walker my minister, Mr. Pechy, Mr. Newcomers, Mr. Ray- 
men t. To Mr. Rogers of Ipswich in New England five pounds aud to Mr. 
Stansby of Ipswich in this County two pounds. Mr. Edes. The poor of 
Assington, of Dedham, of Newton, of Sudbury and of Boxford. Certain 
servants. My son John to be sole executor and my loving nephews Na- 
thauirl and Francis Bacon to be supervisors, to each of whom I give live 
pounds. 

Id the codicil he mentioned others. To my loving brother Martin Sed- 
ley Esq. forty shilling to buy him a ring. Mr. Smith of Dedham. The 
poor of Stoke by Nayland, of Bures St. Mary and of Naylaud. Mr. Eaton 
now living with me. Isaac Cooke my servant. Susan Hudson my servant. 
Edmund Jesupp aud An Rayment, both servants unto my son Brampton 
Gurdon. Reference to the marriage of Brampton Gurdon, my eldest son 
by Merriell my now wife, with Mary, his now wife. Pembroke, 08. 

Kogkh Hill of Poundisford, Somerset, Esq., Sergeant at Law, G March 
1664, proved 26 April 1067. My body to be buried and laid up till the 
day of refreshment come, iu or near the grave or place where the corpse 
or body of her that in her life time was the constant delight of my eyes, 
my late most honored and dear wife Mrs Abigail Hill, daughter of Bramp- 
ton Gurden Esq. deceased, then of Assington Hall in the County of Suf- 
folk, was laid up and interred, it being in the Church of the Inner Temple, 
London, close under the Must window on the South side of the said church, 
under the monuments of Coke and Littleton, in which place was buried 
Gurdon and Meriel, my son and daughter which I had by my said wife, as 
also Jane my eldest daughter which I had by my first and dearly beloved 
vol. XLIX. 10* 



110 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

wife Mrs Kathefine Hill, daughter of Giles Grene of Cross Castle in the 
County of Dorset Esq. deceased. And my will is that my burial be in as 
private a manner as may be without any vain pomp or ceremony at all and 
that blacks or mournings be given to none but to her that is the desire of 
my soul, my now most honored and dear wife, Mrs Abigail Hill (daughter 
of Thomas Barnes deceased, of Alboro Hatch in the County of Dorset* 
Esq. and sister and coheir of James Barnes iKsq. deceased) and to mine and 
her children and servants that shall be in covenant and abiding and menial 
servants with me at the time of my death. My late honored father Wil- 
liam Mill Esq. deceased. My son William. My son Roger. My cousin 
Chaplein of Taunton. My friend and kinsman Sir Walter Yonge of Colly- 
ton, Devon, Baronet, my brothers in law Brampton Gurdon of Letton, 
Norfolk, Esq. and Edward Keighley of Alboro-hatch, Essex, gen 1 , and 
William Chaplein of Taunton, Somerset, gen* &c. My brother in law 
.John Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq. My brother Richard Saltonstall 
Esq. My good brothers Mr John Hill of Taunton, gen 1 , and Mr Richard 
Royle of London gen*. My good sisters Mrs Anne Butler, Mrs Jane Royle 
and IMrs Jane Hill, wife of said brother Mr John Hill. My kinswoman 
Mrs Mary Gully, sister to my cousin William Chaplein aforesaid. My 
son Roger Hill. His mother in law my wife. Carr, 44 

Brampton Gurdon the elder of Letton, Norfolk, gen fc , 10 February 15 
Charles II, A.D. 10G2, with a codicil bearing date 21 February 1G62, 
proved 10 February 10G9, To my wife Mrs Mary Gurdon all those my 
two messuages &c. in Letton, Cranworth and Shipdham, to have and to 
hold for life, and after her decease I give one to my son Thonias Gurdon, 
for life, reserving unto my son Brampton Gurdon &c. free liberty of in- 
gress, egress, &c. into and from my grove lying within the "said premises. 
To my said son Thomas ono thousand pounds. One hundred pounds to 
wife Mary (and use of certain household stuff during her' widowhood). To 
my brother John Gurdon Esq. and Anne his wife, to my sister the Lady 
Mi Id may, to my brother Mr. Sergeant Hill and Abigail his wife, to my 
brother Richard Saltonstall Esq. and Meriell his wife, to my sister Mrs 
Joyce Gurdon, to my nephew Mr. Roger Hill and to my niece Mrs Meryell 
Moseley forty shillings to each of them to buy rings. To the poor of Let- 
ton forty shillings, of Cranworth forty shillings, of Southberch twenty shil- 
lings and of Shipdham three pounds. To all my servants living with me 
at the time of my death (except Anne Foulsham and Francis Stanham) 
twenty shillings apiece, and to the said Anne and Francis forty shillings 
apiece. The rest of my goods &c. to my son Brampton Gurdon whom I 
make executor &c. 

(Codicil) To my daughter Elizabeth Gurdon ten pounds. To my 
brother William Skeffington Esq., my sister SkefFmgton, my brother Ger- 
vase Pigott Esq., my nephew Mr. John Thornhagh, my niece Mrs Jane 
Thomhage and Mrs Margaret Goodwyne, to each of them forty shillings 
to buy rings. To M r Marke Lewes, Mr. Martyn and M 1 ' 3 Martyn twenty 
shillings apiece, and to Mr. Thomas Walker of Assington and M r Stephen 
Poole of Southbergh five pounds apiece, and to the scholar that shall live 

* For Dorset we should read Essex. Thomas Barnes of Aldborough Hatch in Burking, 
Essex, by his second wife, Isabella, daughter of James Harvey, Esq., had, among other 
issue, Abigail, a sister and coheir of James Barnes, who was married four times. Her third 
husband was (his Roger Hill of Bounds ford, Somerset, and her fourth husband Col. George 
Thompson, brother of ltobert and of Maurice Thompson, whoso will, as also that of his 
brother Maurice, I have ready for publication. H. F. Wateks. 






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1895.] Genealogical Gleaning a in England. Ill 

with mo in my house at the time of my death forty shillings. Item, I give 
unto my dear sister Mrs Meriell Saltonstall ten pounds. Penn, 21. 

Dame Amy Mildmay of Graces in Little Baddow, Essex, widow, 18 
5. ZMuy 1669, proved 28 January 1670. To be buried in Little Baddow 

chancel and laid in my sister's grave. To my beloved daughter in law 
.Mary Mildmay, my son Henry's wife, six 1 pounds in gold. To my grand- 
daughter Amy Mildmay, my son Henry's eldest daughter, one hundred 
pounds. To Anno Mildmay, my son's seeond daughter, five pounds. To 
| Mary Mildmay, my son's third daughter, iivo pounds. To Lucy and Eliz- 

beth Mildmay, my son's fourth and fifth daughters, five pounds apiece, and 
all my plate to he equally divided between them. To Fra: Mildmay, my 
Soil's bixtli daughter, twenty mark in money. To Robert Mildmay of 
Tei iing, my son in law, ten pounds, to buy him mourning, and to his wife a 
ring of twenty shillings. To my grandson Robert Mildmay and his sister 
Amy Mildmay ten pounds apiece. To the said Amy, over and above the 
said ten pounds, the sum of one hundred pounds, to be paid her at her age 
of three and twenty years or day of marriage or six months after. 

Item, I give to my brother Jo: Gurdon of Ason in the County of Suffolk 
Esquire the sum of twenty mark in money and to his wife ten pounds. I 
give to his four sons, Philip, Nathaniel, Brampton and Barrett, to each of 
them a ring of twenty shillings. To his three daughters, Judith Gould, 
Anne Gurdon and Amy Forth, to each of them a ring of twenty shillings. 
Item, T give to my sister Saltonstall a ring of twenty shillings. I give to 
my sister Joyce Gurdon six pounds and to her son James Gurdon and John 
Gurdon the sum of ten pounds. To my niece Fisher a ris>g of twenty 
shillings and to my niece Leeds a ring of twenty shillings. To my sister 
in law, my brother Hampton's wife, a ring of twenty shillings. To my 
daughter Wallopp five pounds. To my son Harlackendon a ring of twenty 
shillings and to his wife a ring of twenty shillings. To my cousin Reymond 
o( Ipswich forty shillings and to her daughter Russell forty shillings. To 
my man Robert Ilugerford six pounds. To my two maids Elizabeth Rey- 
mond and Anne Meade three pounds apiece and all my cloathes (&c.). 
To the poor of Little Baddow four pounds. Lands, tenements &c. in Bul- 
mer, Essex, Lavenham, Preston or Brentely Suffolk to my son Henry 
Mildmay and Ins heirs forever. The residue of my goods to my son Henry 
whom 1 make and appoint my sole executor &c. 

I desire my son Henry to pay to the parties here under named the several 
sums of money that I give. To my cousin Lane, M r Walker, Mr. Gilson, 
Mr Wragg, Mr Willis, Mr Crow, Mr Clarke, Mr Reeve, Mr Folkes, Mr 
Oakes, Mr Benson, Mr Hollock, Mr Harrison, Mr Hicks, Joane Baker aud 
Alieo Bowno (sums ranging from ono to ten pounds apiece). Duke, G. 

U John Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq. 25 Juno 1677, proved 4 

October 1G79. To my dear and loving wife Anno Gurdon, for and during 
the term of her natural life, my mansion house wherein I now dwell, com- 
monly called Assington Hall, with all the outhouses, bams, stables, orchards, 
yards and gardens belonging to the same, together with the park and warren, 
with the deer and coneys; also the Priory ground late in the- occupation of 
Abraham Hay ward, with all the- tithes which 1 have now let to William 
Firmin of Assington. J also give her, for term of her natural life, the free 
disposition of the Vicaridgo of Assington so often as it shall bo void (and 
certain farms in Assington and Stoke next Nayland). All which said 






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112 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

farms were settled upon my said wife at her marriage with me, with three 
other farms in Great Cogshall in Essex and other towns thereto adjacent, 
which I do further confirm to her by this my will and do give them to her 
for and during the term of her natural life. To my son Nathaniel Guidon 
the farm in which the widow Sach now liveth and holdeth of me, lying and 
being in Great Cogshall and towns adjacent, after my wife's decease. I 
give him one hundred pounds and to his daughter Anne Gurdou, my grand- 
child, one hundred pounds, to be paid unto him for the use of his said 
daughter and paid to her by him at the age of eighteen years. To my son 
Brampton Gurdon one hundred pounds. To my son Barrett Gurdon oue 
bundled pounds. To my son in law Mr. John Gould, merchant, and his 
wife my daughter, to each of them ten pounds apiece. To my son in law 
Mr. John Jollife and his wife my daughter ten pounds apiece and to my 
son in law Dr. Thomas Jacomb and his wife my daughter ten pounds 
apiece. To my eldest son Robert Gurdon ten pounds, to my son Philip 
Gurdon ten pounds, to my son Nathaniel Gurdon and to his wife ten pounds 
apiece, to my sou Brampton Gurdon ten pounds and to my son Barret 
Gurdon ten pounds. To my four grandchildren, the children of my son 
Nathaniel, of Woodham in Essex, viz 1 John, Elizabeth, Amy and Judith, 
twenty pounds apiece, to be paid within two years after my decease to their 
father for their use and benefit. To my sister Joyce Gurdon of London, 
widow, and to my sister Gurdon of Letton, in Norfolk, and to my brother 
and sister Saltonstall forty shillings apiece. To my brother Robert Gurdon's 
two sons, James and John, and to their sister Anne Gurdon forty shillings 
apiece. To Mr. Walker, Mr. Samuel Cradocke and to M r Ashwell forty 
shillings apiece and to Mr. Ilinde three pounds. To the poor of Aldington, 
Nayland juxta Stoake and Bewers St. Mary and to the poor of Cornard. 
To Amy Hall who served my wife twenty years the sum of ten pounds. 
Bequests to other servants.. My wife Anne Gurdon and my son Philip 
Gurdon to be my executors. 

Francis Quarlos one of the witnesses- King, 129. 

Annk Gurdon of Assington 23 August 1 G80, proved 16 July 1G81. I 
desire that my body may have a private and decent burial. 1 give to my 
son Robert Gurdon my great seal gold ring which was both his grand- 
father's and his father's. I give to my said sou Robert all my stock of deer 
and conies that shall be in the warren park at the time of my death. I 
give, more, to my said son Robert teii pounds. I give to my son in law 
Dr. Thomas Jacomb and my daughter his wife ten pounds apiece. I give 
to my daughter Gould ten pounds. I give to my daughter JollifF teu 
pounds. J give to my son Philip and his wife ten pounds apiece. I give 
to my son Nathaniel and his wife ten pounds apiece. I give to my sou 
Brampton ten pounds. I give to my son Barret ten pounds. Certain 
household stuff to Brampton and to Barret. To my dear brother Mr. 
Henry Parker forty shillings and to my nephew Mr. Henry Parker, his 
son, forty shillings. To my dear brother Mr. Nathaniel Parker forty shil- 
lings. To Ann Gurdon, my son Nathaniel's eldest daughter, thirty and to 
her (his?) daughter Eliza: twenty pounds, to be paid to them at the age of 
twenty years. If either of them die before that age, unmarried, her part 
shall go to the other. To Mr. Thomas Walker of Nayland forty shillings 
and to his wife twenty shillings. Sundry small legacies to others named. 
The remainder of my estate to be laid out in land or otherwise improved 
for the best advantage of my son Nathaniel's children, Ann, Elizabeth, 



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1805.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 113 

John, Amy, Jtirteth and Robert, to be paid to them when they attain to the 
ug.< of twenty years. I do now declare my son Philip Gnrdon and my 
daughter Mrs Anne Jollifl'e to be my executors. Reference to a deed made 
to nephew I\Ir. Henry Parker and Mr. Thomas Walker of Nayland. 
Proved by both executors. North, 107. 

John' Skdlky of Sonthflete, Kent, Esq. " oon of the Kinges Auditours 
in His Kxehequer and Citezein and Stacioner of the Citie of London and 
lute Wardeyn of the CJnvite of Stacioners," 23 February 1530, proved 15 
November 1&&2. M I beqiietlre my soule to almighty god to onr blissed 
Lady and to all the company of hevyn. And my body to be buried in the 
(.'liuivl f Southtlete in the Trinitie Cliapell in the tombe where as Eliza- 
beth my late wife lyeth buried Also I woll that there be as moche money 
dalt<- and gevvn to as many pour people at the day of my buriall, to euery 
pour man and woman ij' 1 and a halpcnye loffe and to euery childe a penny 
and a halpeny lolTe, as woll come and receyve it in the wey ofalmes. Also 
I woll that there be like dole dalt and gevyn to as many po r people and chil- 
dern at my monethes mynde twelve monthes mynde and twoo yeres mynde 
in likewise as it is at my buriall as woll come and receyve it in the wey of 
alines. Also I woll that there be a Dyner kept the said day of my buriall 
for all the Preestes and Clerkes and for all other people that will not take 
the said alines. Also 1 will that myn executours haue as maney masses as 
they can haue preestes at the day of my buriall w l Deprofundis at euery 
masse at the Lavatory for my soule and for the soules of Elizabeth my wife 
my father my mother graunsers and graundams brothers and susters and all 
our Childeru my frendes soules and for the soules of them that 1 haue fared 
the better by and all xpen soules. Also 1 will that there be at eu r y ordre 
of the fyve orders of the frer.es in London a Trentall of masses saide in all 
hast possible after my deeeas w l Deprofundis at eu r y masse at the Lavatory 
to pray for the soules aforsaid And myn executours to paye to every ordre 
of th i said \'y\o orders of the ffreres x s for the said Trentalles. Also I woll 
that there be made by myn executours at euery ordre of the said fyve 
orders of the freres in Loudon a Chauntrye foreuer to say masse euery day 
foreuer for twoo pence euery day for masse Sin for euery ordre by yere 
iij" xiiij 1 And to geve them money for the said Chauntries after xx li yeres 
purrha>o that is to- say to eury ordre lxj li iij s iiii (1 And in like wise to haue 
at euery ordre of the said freres an obite ami a Trentall of masses eu r y 
yere foreuer for x 9 a yere for euery crdre And to geve them money for 
the said obites and trentalles after xx" yeres purchase that is to say to euery 
order x 11 to pray for the soules aforesaid. And myn executours to take 
sewertie of them if it be not doon then to distreyn for a penaltie in suche 
bowsing as is in their monastery for eu r y weke that it is not kept. Also I 
woll that as many prestes monkes (freres and chanons that woll come as 
may save masse euery day during oon hole yere next after the day of my 
decesse at the awter in the said Trinitie Chapel 1 where as my said wife is 
buried And also where as I by the grace of god shall bo buried to say masse 
oon after another and eu r y preest to haue iiij' 1 as many as woll come and say 
masse with Deprofundis at euery masse at the lavatory and after masse at 
our Tomhe Deprofundis never to be denyed to sey masse at that oon awter 
and at noon other awter during the said yere to pray for the soules aforsaid." 
Kefereneo made to \ % loudes and tenementes at lvye that was myn the whicho 
Was oxchaunged with .John May no for certeyn loudes and Tenementes in 
London." " Also 1 woll and ordeyu that the Annuitie of foure pouudes 















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114 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

that T haue grant] ted to the Priour and Covont of Rochestre and to tlieir 
sucoessours for a Chauntrie to sey masse every day foreuer And an obite 
euery yere foreuer in their monastery of the profiles issues and Revenues 
of all my londes and tenementes in London I woll that it be truely paide 
foreuer daily wekelye monthly and yerely foreuer according to the teno r 
of twoo indentures therof made whereof oon is under their Couent Seall in 
my keping And thother is undre my Seall in their own keping And that the 
said Priour and Covent haue full power and auctoritie to do all thiuges to 
the teno 1 of the said indenture. And if the said Prio r and Covent or their 
Successours at any tyme hereafter doo seasse and sey not the said diuine 
seruice as it is conteyned in the said indentures by the space of a weke then 
I woll that it shall be lefull unto myn heires executours and assignes as 
often and at eu'y tyme as the said diuine seruice doo ceasse and is not saide 
by the space of a weke to entre into the ruauo's of ffrendisbury and Wold- 
ham And to distresse for vj s viij' 1 in the name of a peyn for euery weke 
that the said diuine seruice doo ceasse and is not saide according to the said 
indentures. Also I will that there be an obite kept of x s by the yere 
foreuer in the Abbey of Langdon besides Dover where as my mother lyeth 
buried with dirige and tenne masses that is to sey Dirige of the evyu by 
note and the next day after mass of Requiem by note And the residue of 
the masses to be saide w' the Abbott and Chanons of the said Abbey and 
w r other prestes the Abbot to haue for his labour eu r y yere xij' 1 eu'y Chanon 
preest vj' 1 eu'y Chanon Novys iiij' 1 And to eu'y other preest that saith dirige 
and masse vj' 1 and to eury Childe that helpith the preest to masse a penny 
And for Ryuging of belles after the custume of other obites And the said 
' obite to be doon by the ouersight of the parson of Ryngwolde for^he tyme 
being and to sey dirige and masse hauing for his labour euery yere xij d . 
And the residue of the money of the said x s yf any then be left a to be dalte 
and gevyn to pour people to pray for the soules aforsaid. And the said 
obite to be kept at the Day that my other obittes is kept." ' Provisions in 
case of "delawte of payment." Ten marks more out of the revenues &c. 
of lands &q. in London and elsewhere to make another "Chauntrie" in 
Trinity Chapel in the church of Southfleet &c., "an honest preest to say 
masse euery day with Deprofundis at the Lavatory and after masse Depro- 
fundis at our tombe. And the said preest shall say Placebo and Dirige 
euery Munday Wenysday and lFriday in the yere foreuer for the soules 
aforsaid And to say masse euery day in the weke foreuer as it is con- 
teyned in the Indentures made bitvvene the Priour and Covent of Rochestre 
and me in eu r y condicion yf it can be lawfully doon And that the said 
Chauntrie of Southflete to be surely made with Induction and w l Institucion 
and a patron to geve it when it is voide " &c. " Also I woll that thre tapers 
aboute the lampe before the blissed Trinitie be founde foreuer in the trinitie 
Chapell at Southflete. Also I woll that the Churche of Southflete haue 
tenne mrces to repaire the said Churche. Also I geve to the church of 
Southllete xxx 8 for my tithes and offeringes forgotten. Also I will that 
sir Robert Carter shalbe my Chauntrie preest and begynne my Chauntrye 
at Southflete " &c. during his life, u orelIes another honest preest during his 
life, and so oon after another." u Also I woll that there be gevyn to 
twelve pour men and woman at Southflete and Northfiete euery Sonday 
foreuer xij' 1 And that eury of them to say a pater nostor a ave maria and 
a ('rede euery Sonday Coroner at my Tombo in the said Trinitie Chapell 
to pray for the soules aforesaid." Directions to make and found a similar 
chauntry and obite in the parish church of Navestock, Essex. " Also 1 geve 






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189!>i] Genealogical Gleanings in England, 115 

to the church of Navestoke a torehe and in redy money xl 8 to repaire the 
said Churche. Also I vvolle that tlie Annuitie of xliiii s by yere owt of all 
my Louden and tenementes in Horton be truely paide to the Priores and 
Coven t of Dertfort for an obiie euery yere forever and a masse to be said 
euery Sonday and Ilolydaies in the yere foreuir to pray for the soules 
aforesaid." 

11 Also I will that William Sedley myn eldest sonne haue Immediatly 
after that oon yere is fynysshed and ended next after my deceas all my hede 
tenement to dwell in with all the londes w l thappurtennces in Southflete 
that I bought of Thomas Bayne late Maister Cressell londes and Lundisshe 
londes as .John Mathewe and William Vmf'rey late had to ferine for terme 
of his lyfo and to the heires of his body lawfully begotten And for defaute of 
such.- heires to Remayn to Martyn Sedley my congest sonne for terme of 
his lyfe and to the heires of his body laufully begotten. And for defaute 
of suelie heires Then I wille that all the Revenues Issues and Profites of 
all the said londes and tenementes be equally devided bitwene the thre 
Abbeys and Monasteries of Rochestte Dertford and the Abbey of our 
blissed Lady of grace beside the Towr of Loudon And the Churche of 
Southflete for the terme of fourscore and nyntene yeres seying thre masses 
in eii' y <>f the said Abbeys and in the said Churche of Southflete eu r y Day 
in the Weke every yere during the said yeres over and aboue the said 
masses for my said Chauntries and obites for the soules aforsaid with 
Deprofundis at the Lavatory and after masse. And after the said four- 
score and nyntene yeres ended and expired the said londes and tenementes 
to be solde by the Priour and Couent of Rochestre then being And by the 
Priores and Couent of Dertforde then being And by the Abbot and 
Couent of the said Abbey of grace then being And the money thereof 
comyng to be bestowed spent and dal'te in masses deades and \% charitable 
dedes in their owne Abbeys and Monasteries and in the said Churche of 
Southtlete, evynly to be devided in masses and in diriges, and in other places 
as it shall seine best the said Prio r and Covent Priores and Couent Abbot 
and Couent for the tymo being for the soules aforsaid and all xpen soules. 
Also I will that all my londes and tenementes that I bought late of Willnl 
Swan and of Joane Hunt sett lying and being at a place called the llooke in 
Southflete as Henry Godfrey hath nowe to ferine holely after that oon yere 
is fynysshed and ended next after .'■my deeeese shall remayn to Marty n 
Sedley my yongest sonne for terme of his lyfe, and to the heires of his body 
laufully begotten" (then follow provisions for entailing the remainder first 
on William Sedley and his heirs and lastly on the said three abbeys and the 
Church of Southflete for masses &e. ) " Also I woll that all my londes and 
tenementes that I haue in Dertford shall remayn to Dorothye Sedley my 
dougliter being a Nonne in Dertford Abbey during hir lyfe soo that the 
Rej)acions be kept to array hir with the Revenues and profites of it to pray 
for the soules aforesaid And after hir deceas to remayn as other my forsaid 
londes doo and shal Remayne after that my said Channtries and obites be 
fynysshed." 

Dorothy, the daughter, to have also twenty shillings sterling a year of 
annuity during her life out of all the lands &c M except the two tenements 
given to the two sons, and William also to have, out of the same lands &c., 
twenty pounds sterling a year untill the Will be performed. " And then 
the said Will m Sedley shalhaue all my londes and tenementes unbeqneathed 
pfourmyng this my will for terme of his lyfe and to the heires of his body 
laufully begotten And so after to remayn as it is declared in this my wille. 



HO Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Also I woll that all the money that I leve in my Coffers and all the 
Renames Issues and Proiites of all my Londes and tenementes mano r 8 
quyte Rentes and Rent chargis not gevyn nor willed nor beqnethed in 
Oxney Rekisborn Stapill Asshe or any other place parisshe or parishes 
Avithin the Countie of Kent, the Rent charge of William Swan gentilman 
within the said Countie, And also of all my Ma no 1 " londes and Tenementes 
Qnyte Rentes Rent charges in Navestoke Lough ton South bemeflete Thun- 
dersley frbbbyng and Corryngham or in any other place w l in the Countie 
of JMidd and elleswhere in Englonde to perfourme and fynysshe all the said 
buriall monethis mynde tvvelve-monthes mynde and twoo yeres mynde doles 
masses Chauntres obittes and all other thinges and bequestes aforeiehersed 
and here after rehersed and to pay Immediatly after my deceas all such 
money to the gsones undre written as hereafter folovveth that is to say to 
William Sedley ray sonne fourty poundes to fulfill my will truely Martyn 
Sedley my sonne fourty poundes to see my wille truely pfourmed James 
Sedley my brother tenne poundes Elizabeth Sedley my doughter five mfces 
John Sedley William and Robert the sonnes of William my sonne tenne 
poundes And I woll that the said sonnes of Willm my sonne shalhaue a 
Annuitie of tenne mrees sterlinges by yere when any of them cometh to the 
age of twenty yeres during their lyves and the lenger lyver out of all my 
londes and tenementes, except the twoo tenementes that I haue gevyn to 
my twoo sonnes, ffraunces Sedley tenne poundes and all my wifes apparell 
Dorothy Sedley my doughter a Nonno tenne mrees to pray for me." (Then 
follow sundry bequests to a lot of servants and others.) Sir Robert Carter 
to be ou'seer of this my wille to see it truely pfourmed and to pray for me, 
xl s Deff Sir Robert nowe my prest x s to pray for me," " Heni^y Godfrey 
of Southflete my ifermo 1 ' to be ouerseer of this my wille to see it truely 
pfo'med And to pray for me fyve mi'ces And I wolle that t*ie said Uenry 
shalhaue my housing and londes that he now dwell ith in to ferme for xi 
yeres as he had it of me to ferme before according to Tndentures therof 
made. The wife of said Godfrey to pray for me xiij s iiij' 1 ." " Also I will 
that William Axton late my flermour at Mailing haue xxx 8 to pray for me 
And in reeompens of the distresse that was taken from him and solde." 
"Also I will that there be an yerely obite foreuer of iij* iiij' 1 of the Issues 
and proiites of all my londes in London kept yerely in the Churche of 
Qiisto.n beside Dover where James Sedley my graunsir and Joane my 
grandam lyeth buried to pray for the soules and all the soules aforesaid 
The said obite to be kept w l Dirige and thre masses, every preest to haue 
vj d for dirige and masse the parishe Clerk ij' 1 for Rynging of belles after 
the olde cnstume And the Residue of the money to be in bred and drynke 
amonge the people at the said obite, And for defawte of payment it shalbe 
lefnll unto the (Jurat and Church Wardeyns of Guston for the tyme being 
to distresse in and upon all my londes and tentes in London and upon all 
my londes in Oxney beside Dover for the terme of fourscore and xix yeres 
yf they doo kepe truely the said obite in manner aforsaid. Also I woll 
that the curate of Gnston doo pray in the Pnlpitt eu'y sonday in the yere 
foreuer for the soules of me and my wife my father mother Graunsir and 
grandam by name and for all our Childern and see my obite there truely 
kept, And to haue euery yere for his labour viij' 1 Also I geve unto Guston 
Chnich towarde the Repaeions therof xxvi H viij' 1 Also J will there be an 
yerely obite foreuer of iij H iiij' 1 of the profites of all my londes in London 
kept yerely in the cliirch of Westeclyif beside Lover where Robert Sedley 
my father lyeth buried The said obite to be kept with Dirige and thre 



189f>.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 117 

masses" (then follow instructions similar to those given about the obite in 
the Church at Guston). Provisions for keeping the Chauntry and obite 
in the Abbey of Graces near the Tower of London. " Also I woll that 
myn executours doo close and amend w l wynscott the Chapel of saint Anne 
in the said Abbey for the said Chauntrye there to be kept foreuer after the 
teno 1 ' of the said indentures. Also I woll that all my yerely Qhaun tries 
obittes and masses afore rehersed to be begynne and saide immediately 
after my deceas and so to contynne foreuer and to be trnely paide. Also 
I woll that all my evidences and bokes shalbe putt in a great Chest, And 
I woll that the said Chest shall stands w f in the said Abbey of Dertford in 
our lady Chapell next the hennery orolles where it shall please my lady 
Pnoi'es best and my sonne William to liaue the keyes of the said Chest in 
keping and free goyng and comyng therto untill this my will be ])founned." 
Bequests made to the churehes of Oxney, Northflete. Meaphiim and Mor- 
ton. Prayers to be made for self and wife every Sunday forever. kk Also 
I geve unto Milton Churehe next gravesende a Torche price v B And the 
preest to pray for me and my wife in the pulpitt as it is abouesaid." Simi- 
lar bequests to the churehes at Gravesend, Asshe next Dartford, Brasted, 
Bekeshorno, Sfapill and Loughtou. "Also I geve to the parishe of Al- 
halowes the lille in Loudon toward the Repacious of the Churehe there xl s . 
Also 1 woll when all thinges aforesaid and hereafter rehersed is fynysshed 
and ended, Then I woll that all my Londes and tenementes w l thapp'teniices 
in Thundersley Loughtou Southbemefiete Corringham and ffobbyng in the 
Countie of Essex shall remayn to Martyn Sedley my yongest sonne for 
terme of his ly.fe and to the heires of his body lawfully begotten And for 
the defawte of the heires of the said Martyn of his body laufully ^begotten, 
then I woll the said Londes ami tenementes Ivemayn to Willfii Sedley 
myn eldest, sonne for terme of his lyfe and to the heires of h : .s body lau- 
fully begotten, And for the defawte of suche heires Then I woll that all 
the l\encnues Issues and prolites of the said Londes and* tenementes be 
equally devided bitwene the said thre Abbeys Dertford Rochester and the 
Abhey of Towre Hill And the said Churehe of Southtlete for the terme of 
fourscore and nyntene yeres for the maynteynyng and keping of the said 
thre masses in euery of the said thre Abbeys and in the said Churehe of 
Southtlete euery day in the weke euery yere during the said fourscore and 
nyntene yeres over and aboue the said masses for my said Chauntries and 
obittes to pray for the soules uforsaid and after that the said foil rescore and 
nyntene yeres is ended, Then 1 woll'yf the said londes and tenementes can 
be mortised to the said Abbeys and to the said Church of Southtlete eu r y 
oon their owne parte, then to mortise it, And to sey three masses euery day 
in the yere foreuer in euery of the said Abbeys and in the said Churehe of 
Southtlete, oner and abone the said masses for my forsaid Chauntries and 
obittes. And yf the said Londes and tentes cannot be mortised as it is 
aforsaid Then 1 woll that it be solde by the said Frio 1 " and Couent, Priores 
and Couent, and Abbot & Couent or by their Successours, And the money 
thereof to be bestowed spent and dalte in almes and Charitable dedes and 
in masses and diriges in their owne Abbeys and in the said Church of 
Southtlete evynly to be devided in foure partes to pray for the soules afor- 
said and all xpen soules." My brother James Sedley to have ten marks a 
year during his life. u Also I woll that my doughter Dorothe Sedley Initio 
my pott of siluer with the kever that is w l Uynges in the topp of the kever, 
my doughter Elizabeth Sedley to liaue my gilte goblet, John Sedley to 
haue my grettist siluer pott, ffrauuees Sedley to haue the litell pott of siluer 

VOL. XLIX. 11 
























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118 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

with the kever, My sonne William Sedley to bane oon of the grettist Cup- 
pis of silucr w' a kever, My sonne Martyn Sedley to hane the secunde Cupp 
of sillier Without a kever after the first yew, is ended next after my deceas. 
Also I wille that all the residue; of my sillier plate and all my hoiiseholdo 
stuffe ;uid bedding, And all myn apparell And all my Corne and Catall be 
equally devided bitwene my twoo sonnes at thende of the yere next after my 
deeesse." " I woll to Thomas Ilurton 'dough tor that hath maried oon Wil- 
liam Olyff and to a nother doughter of the said Thomas Ilurton that the 
said Willm Olyff can tell whom she hath maried and where she dwellith 
haue eche of them fyve mrees, And if they be decessed then to their heires 
and ehildern." Certain bequests for the improving of highways. " Also 
I woll that if any psone woll swere upon a boke that I doo owe him any 
money and myn executours doth thinke his owthe not trewe, then the said 
psone to bringe lauf'ull witnesse before my Lordes the twoo chief Juges or 
before any other twoo Juges to prove the said d.-tt, And then myn executO r a 
w'out any furt.her delay to paye asmoche money as the said twoo chief 
Juges or other ij Juges shall awarde after their conscience." Conditional 
provision for a chauntry in the Abbey of Dertford. 

"Also 1 make and ordeyn myn executours of this my last wille and tes- 
tament William Sedley my eldest sonne Martyn Sedley my yongest sonne 
and my Lady Priores of l)erlfor<l for the tyme being, oon after another 
successy vely to peifourme and fulfill this my wille in euery condicion, And 
] woll that noon of myn executours shall medill with the perl'ourmaunce 
and fulfilling of this my said will and testament but oonly the said William 
Sedley my sonne to medill during his lyf, And after his deceas none but 
oonly the said Martyn Sedley my sonne to medill during his h'fe, And 
alter his deeesse my Lady Priores of Hertford for the tyme being, And 
al'ler hi r deeoas the next Priores oon after a nother sueeessivo'y to medill 
till this my will and testament be pl'o'med in eu'y condieOn And I make 
and ordeyn the Priour of Rochester, the Abbot of Towre IT die, sir Robert 
Carter and Henry Godfrey my Ouerseers of this my last wille and testa- 
ment to see it truely perfourmed and fulfilled in euery condicion, And yf by 
Lerned councell that this my wille be made shorter for great ease to the 
Eedcrs and the executours of it, soo that the entent and the trewe meanyng 
of this my last, wille be not elmunged I am content, but that then tent herein 
nowe written shall always be as it is nowe written." Thower, 20. • 

William Sedley, son of John Sedley of Southflete, Kent, Esq., 28 
November 1553, proved 4- December 1555. My body to be buried in the 
Church of Southflete whereas my father, my mother and my wife are buried 
and " withe suche service as shalbe used to be doon in the churche for deade 
i'olkes, And like service to be doon to the Laude of god at my monethes 
mynde, two yeres minde and thre yeres minde, for my sowle, my frendes 
and all xpen sowles. And 1 will that there be given and delte in the 
parishe churche wheare I shall be buried, at the daie of my burial!, of my 
monthes minde, of my yeres minde, two yeres minde and thre yeres minde, 
by myne heires or executors, to euerie poor marine a penny lofe of breade, 
to euerie poore woman a penny lofe and to euerie poore childe a halfe 
penny lofe of breade, at euerie of the said Daies to as many poore folkes as 
will cum and receiue hit in the waie of alines to praie for the saide sowles. 
And L will that there be made and kepte by myne heires and executors a 
dinner at the daie of my buriall and at the daie of my monethes minde, for 
all suche personnes as do not receiue the saide Almes and will cum to din- 



1 8 H 5 . ] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 119 

ner, to praie for my sowle, my frendes and all xpen sowles. Also T will 
that, there bo a Sermon made by a well learned mantle of the woorde of 
god in the churehe wheare I shalbe buried the daie of my burial! and 
moiithes minde." Sundry bequests to the poor of various parishes. " Also 
J will that John my sonne, or my sister or either of them, do giue, within 
thre yeres nexte after my decease, to poore maidens marriages, And to 
other poore fol.kes their denocioii after tlieire discretion, untill the somine 
of five poundes be fully gi\*efi to praie lor tin; saide sowles. Also I will 
that (he saide John my sonne shall geU'e within the saide thre yeres to tenne 
Stud'ientes of Diuinitie in the Vniversitees lackinge exhibition, who me my 
saide sonne shall thinke to be godliq, x s apece, to praie for my sowle, and 
all the said sowles." Provisions to carry out, if possible, the pious bequests 
made by his father in his last will and testament. To Master William* 
Wombwell, my godson, thirteen shillings four pence. To Mistress [Cath- 
erine, my god daughter, forty shillings. To Sister Elizabeth Cressener 
forty shillings.- To my cousin Androwe Hawes twenty shillings. To my 
cousin Androwe Cooke, her* niece, to her marriage, forty shillings. To- 
my cousin Thomas I>etenham, of the money he owetli me for his annuity, 
twenty shillings. To his brother and three sisters twenty six shillings eight 
pence. (To others, named, various sums, among whom a S'uster Efllyn 
and a Suster Mary Benham). To John Sedley my son, to see my will 
performed; one hundred pounds. To my daughter Anne, my son's wife, 
one hundred shillings. To Robert Sedley, my son, to see my will per- 
formed, one hundred marks. To Nicholas, my son, to see my will performed, 
one hundred marks. To my daughter Elizabeth, she to marry at her 
pleasure by the counsel of her aunt, my sister, and of John my son, her 
brother, and to have meat, drink and lodging till she be married or 
else be found in a good service, three hundred marks. To 'my brother- 
Martin, to see my will performed, fifty marks. To ray sister Dorothy, to, 
see my will performed, twenty pounds. To my nephew Marten, my 
brother's son, live marks. To sundry churches for repairs. To the amend- 
ment of highways. To my sister Dorothy Sedley an annuity of ten pounds 
a year during her life. To John Sedley, my eldest son, Robert Sedley,. 
my second son, Nicholas Sedley, my youngest son, my sister Dorothy, my 
daughter Hyde and my daughter Elizabeth (sundry pieces of silver plate). 
I give to my brother Mai ten Sedley my manor of Morley Hall in the 
County of Norfolk (being of the yearly value of fifteen pounds clear above 
the charges) wherein my brother dwelleth, late bought, of Sir Harry r.uk^.r, 
knight, to have and to hold freely during his natural life, and after his de- 
cease to remain to my nephew Martin Sedley, his son, and to his heirs of 
ltis body lawfully begotten, upon condition that my said kk Npvy " and his 
heirs &c'. shall yearly pay or cause to be paid, at the Feasts of the Annun- 
ciation of our blessed Lady and of St. .Michael the Archangel, live pounds 
of good money to my son and heir John Swdloy and to his heirs &c., and, 
for lack of such, to my right heirs &c. I give to Elizabeth Sedley, my 
daughter, all my lands i&c. in Erensbury &c. in Kent. To my son Thomas 
Hide and to Frances Hyde his wife, my daughter, during their natural 
lives and the longer liver of them, an annuity of live pounds a year that [ 
have out of his manor of Willesthorne, Herts, and after their decease the 
said annuity to remain to George Hyde their son &c. remainder to the 
right heirs of the said Frances for ever. To my sister Dorothy Sedley 

[* Tills phrase ("her niece") makes me suspect that the names I have written Androwe 
were meant to bo Androwe, which would lie another rending tor Audrey. II. F. \\\] 



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120 Genealogical Gleanings in England* [Jan. 

my tenement at the church in Southflete that Hull now dwelloth in, to have 
and (o hold &g. during her life, the remainder to John Sedley and his heirs, 
lie keeping it in re|>;i.ir during ray sister's life. Reference made to testator's 
property! which seems to liave included dwelling houses, inns, dye-houses, 
brew-houses, farms &e. (in numerous parishes in Kent) and in Merifelde 
and Fletchinge, Sussex, and Navestocke, Loughton and Wisden, Essex, 
also in Staunford, Coringham, Fobbinge, Thundersley, Berasflete and Had- 
ley in Essex. My cousin Thomas Bretenham of Pluckley (Kent). Lands 
in Tottenham, Middlesex, which I late bought of my brother Martin Sedley. 
I make and ordain John Sedley, my son, Dorothy Sedley, my sister, 
Robert and Nicholas Sedley, my sons, to be my executors &e. and Martin 
Sedley, my brother, and Thomas Hyde, ray son, and Frances his wife, my 
daughter, and Elizabeth Sedley, my daughter, and John Hudson of South- 
fleet to be my overseers. More, 37. 

Nicholas Sedley of the Charterhouse, Middlesex, Esquire, 14 May 

1574, proved 1 February 1574. To be buried in the parish church of St. 
Pulcres. I give and bequeath all ray lands, tenements and hereditaments 
being and lying in Mepsham, Kent, to Jane my wife, for term of her life, 
remainder to the heirs of my body, then to Robert Sedley, my brother, and 
his heirs. Lands in Surrey, Herts and Hampshire. My daughter Susan 
to be in the custody and under the government of my wife until her 
full age of twenty one or marriage. My godson William Sedley. My 
brother John Sedley. My sister Elizabeth Culpeper. My coifsin George 
Hyde. My cbusiii Martin Sedley. My godson Nicholas Hyde. My wife 
Jane to be executrix. William Sedley Esq. father unto me the said Nicho- 
las. Pyckering, 5. 

John Sedley of Southflete, Kent, Esq., eldest son of William Sedley 
late of Southflete deceased Esq., 1 )( J March 1581, proved 23 August 1581. 
To be buried in the church of Southflete "in the chappell there where- 
as ray graundfather and my graunumother my flather and my mother lye 
buried layinge there a stone upon me makinge mencion by gravinge in 
brasse thereuppon that my bodye is there buried." To my wife Anne Sed- 
ley all those my lands and tenements &<*. in Kent mentioned in a pair of 
Indentures made between me and my said wife's natural brethren Richard 
Colepepyr and John Colepepyr. My eldest son William Sedley. Lands 
that were his grandfather's or great-grandfather's, in London, Essex or 
elsewhere. My second son John Sedley and my youngest son Richard 
Sedley, Elizabeth and Dorothy Sedley, my two daughters. My natural 
brother Robert Sedley. The heirs of the body of my natural brother 
Nicholas Sedleye deceased. My sister Elizabeth Cole pep ir. The heirs of 
the body of ray sister Frances Hide deceased. I will and give unto Mr. 
John Tufton ray sou in law, to make him a ring with, twenty shillings. 
Also I give unto Anne, Elizabeth and Margaret Tufton, ray said son Tufcon's 
daughters, to every of them when they shall accomplish the age of sixteen 
years forty shillings to buy them some Jewell, six pounds. To my brother 
Robert twenty shillings to make him a rine and I will that a bill of four- 
score pounds or thereabouts which he ovveth me be unto him delivered. To 
ray brothers in law M 1 . Thomas Colepepyr and Mr. John Colepepir twenty 
shillings each (for rings). To my natural sister Elizabeth Colepepir, wife 
of the said Mr, John Colepepir, to make her a ring, ten shillings. To my 
brother in law Mr. Richard Colepepir, to make him a ring, forty shillings. 












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1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 121 

Also I give unto my "cosigne" Mr. Martin Sedley, to make him a ring, 
twenty shillings. To my brother John Colepipir's son, my godson, twenty 
shillings. I make my wife Anne and my eldest son William my executors. 

Proved by the oath of Anne Sedley, relict and executrix, power reserved 
for William Sedley, the other executor named &c. 

Commission issued 20 April 1G38 to Sir John Sedley, Baronet, grandson 
of the said John Sedley deceased, to administer the goods left unadminis- 
tered by Anne Sedley the relict &c, now also deceased. Darcy, 31. 

Martyn Sedley of Morley, Norfolk, gen 1 ., 12 May 1G08, proved 5 
March 1009. My body to be buried in the church of St. Peter's in Morley. 
I have already conveyed and assured my manor of Morley Hall (and other 
lands &.c.) in the said County unto my son Martyn Sedley and to his heirs 
male «&.c, unto whom I do hereby give and bequeath all my deeds, charters, 
evidences, iTeoffments, escripts and muniments, court books, court rolls, 
Accoiupts, Indentures of P>argaius and Sales and all other my writings 
whatsoever that do belong or do appertain unto all the said manors and to 
every of them. Certain lands in Shimpling and Dickleborowe, Norfolk, un- 
to Robert Sedley my son and to his heirs forever, and all deeds &c. belong- 
ing to the same. 1 have by my deed indented long since granted unto 
Raffe Sedley my son, now Sir Raffe Sedley, knight, one annuity or yearly 
rent of twenty pounds, to be issuing and going out of my manor of Some- 
hall and BurfFord Hall, otherwise Flynt hall, Norfolk, &c. I do ^hereby 
utterly make void, frustrate and to be of none effect the said deed and grant 
of twenty pounds by year &c. (as in the condition or proviso in the said 
deed expressed). Certain servants named. The poor of Wemondham, 
Uingham &c. The residue of my goods &c. to my wife Abigail, whom I 
appoint executrix. Wingfield, 22. 

Seutcntia proconfirmacione was declared 28 June 1610 in a'cause between 
Abigail Sedley, the relict and executrix of the above will, on the one part 
and Sir Raphe Sedley, knight, Martin Sedley, Robert Sedley, Ann Smith 
ah Sedley and Meriale Gurdon ah Sedley, sons and daughters of the de- 
ceased. Wingfield, 53. 

[ l have given a large space to my collection of 'wills illustrating the pedigree 
of the Saltonstalls and one or two of the families into which they intermarried, 
It being the accumulated gatherings of nearly a dozen years' gleaning auiorig the 
wills stored in Somerset House. And I have quoted largely from the "will of 
John Sedley (1530-^1532) for the reason that it is a very good specimen of the 
■will of a pious gentleman of that period, and it may interest the many "good 
Bostonians" and others of New England and New York and elsewhere in the 
United States who can claim a descent from him to learn -what pains he took 
for the Welfare of his soul, his father's and mother's souls, the souls of his 
grandfather and grandmother and all Christian souls, by founding charities, 
establishing obites and directing the saying and singing of masses and diriges. 
It was his great-granddaughter, Muriel Sedley, who became the second wife of 
Brampton Gurdon of Assington, Suffolk, Esq., and the mother of Muriel Sal- 
tonstall. 

In llarleian MS. 4030 (page 512) is <*iven a pedigree of Saltonstall of llunt- 
wieke (bearing Arg: abend Gules between 2 eaglets displayed Sable) beginning. 
With Gilbert Saltonstall who purchased Uookes in Ilipperhohue and other lands 
and had issue Samuel and Richard. 'The younger was. afterwards knighted,, 
served the oilleeol' the Sherlit'of London A.J). 1588 and wjis Lord Mayor of that 
city in l.v.»7. 1 1 is elder brother, Samuel, son and heir of Gilbert, married three 
wives : First, Anne, daughter of Mr. John llamsden of Lougley ; second, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Mr. Thomas Ogden; and third, Mrs. Elizabeth Armine of 
Hull, widow. By the last wife he had no issue. The issue by the other two 
wives is given. Ills eldest sou and heir (by his llrst wife) was our Sir Kichard 

VOL. XLIX. 11* 



122 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Saltonstall, the friend of Winthrop and one of the founders of Massachusetts 
Bay Colony. He is described as Justice of the Peace and Treasurer for Lame 
Soldiers in the West Riding of Yorkshire the first year of the Reign of King 
Charles t tie First, We are told that he married Grace, daughter of Robert 
Kayo of Woodsome Esq., and had issue several children, sons and daughters. 
After her death he sold his lands and went with his children into New England 
where ho lived and (as was said) married the daughter of the Lord Delaware 
and in the troublesome times came into England and resided at London. In the 
same MS. is given a pedigree of Eamsden of Longley near Ilotherslield (Ilud- 
derstleld?) in which Anne Saltonstall is shown to be the daughter of John, son 
of Robert Ramsden. The arms are described as Argent, on a chevron Sable 3 
rams' heads couped of the First. ■'• 

See also Hunter's Collection in Additidnal MS. 24,458 (205). In Harleian MS. 
475i> (not noticed in Sims) may be found a pedigree of Knyvett (fo. 5) and one of 
Sedley (fo. 42). Harl. MS. 0071 (Candler's) gives Parker, Gurdon and Saltonstall 
connection (179). Harl. MS. 820!) (224, 226-7) gives Gurdon. See also Add. 
MS. 12,471. See Signet Office Doc.quct for note of Pardons granted to John 
and Brampton Gurdon (Vol. 13, August, 16-60). 

From the late Col. Chester's extracts from the P. 11. of St. Leonard's, Shore- 
ditch (through the kindness of Dr. Marshall) I gathered the following: 

Mar: 1G17 June 18 Richard Saltonstall Esq. and Elizabeth Bassano 
(11 ox ton). 

Sir Richard Saltonstall, the Lord Mayor of London, was a member of the 
Skinners Companv and a Merchant Adventurer. He was admitted to Freedom 
18 December 5 (1 > Edw. VI (1551). John Saltonstall, son of Edward Saltonstall 
of Staines, Middlesex,, yeoman, was apprenticed to him Xinas 15(5*1- for eight 
years, liichard, son of Richard, Saltonstall was sworn 31 May 1580 by patri- 
mony of his said father and paid for his admission. Under date November 20, 
1509, I found this : " M (l . that whereas at the Request of the Right honourable 
S r . Richard Saltonskall late Lord Maior, on the behalfe of the Lady Maioresse, 
by order of the Court of Aldr'en the XXVL of October 1598, y l was ordered that 
John Held shoulde be admitted into tne freedome and liberties of the City of 
Loudon by redemption in this Companie of Skinners as p' Copie of record under 
the Tow he Clerkes hands appeareth Theire Wo ls . p r nte at this Courte according 
to auncicnt cnstome in that behalfe have admitted the said John Held a free 
brother of this Companie of Skynners by redempeon and the said John paied 
for his admission . . . . . iij 8 iiij (1 And then the said John Hclde did 
promise my M' s . the Wardens a hoggeshcd of the strongest bere whensoeuer 
they wold demaund it." IIicnhy F. Watkks.] 

Klizaukth Grave, Juno IS, 1587 [ante vol. 48, page 499). — 

[1 have no doubt that the above widow, Elizabeth Crave, was that unnamed 
wife of Richard Grave referred to in the will of John Elyott of Stortford par- 
sonage (1557) of which I gave an abstract in Register for July 18i)4 (p. 390), 
and .John Elyott, her eldest son (likewise referred to) was, we may infer, her 
son by a previous marriage. If this is a correct inference we are still left in 
the dark as to the name of her former husband and his exact relationship to 
the rest of the Eliot family. IIeniiy F. Waters.] 

William Willoughby, Portsmouth, 1 August 1650, signed and sealed 
28 November 1650, proved 6 May 1651. My wife Elizabeth to be execu- 
trix. To my eldest son Francis Willoughby two hundred pounds, to be 
paid him within twelve months after my death. If my foresaid wife should 
at any time after my death be married again to another then I do hereby 
give to my said son Francis three hundred pounds more of my lawful 
moneys. And I give him half of my movable goods whatsoever and half 
my plate; which said moneys and goods lie shall receive at or about the 
time when my wife Elizabeth shall be married to another or any time after 
when he shall appoint. I do give and bequeath unto each of the three 
eldest children of my son Francis that are now remaining alive fifty pounds 






1895.] . Genealogical Gleanings in England. 123 



apiece, which for all three amounteth to an hundred and fifty pounds, to 
remain in (lie hands of Klizabeth my foresaid wife, except she marry her- 
self to another, which if she doth then it shall he forthwith, at or about the 
time of her marriage, made over to my son Francis, to be by him paid unto 
the male children when they shall come to the age of twenty years and to 
the female children either at the day of marriage or at eighteen years of 
age. To my sou William ten pounds for his portion and no more till it 
shall please' God to give him grace, or till he be civilized, betaking himself 
to some lawful calling to live in the world as a man should do, which if he 
do and after one year's experience thereof there shall be testimony brought 
concerning the truth of the same under four godly men's hands, 1 no hereby 
give and bequeath unto him one hundred pounds besides the ten pounds 
foremen tibued. Another bequest of a hundred pounds in case he live for 
another twelve months a reformed and civilized life, testimony being had to 
that effect. Provision made for his children in case of his remaining " iu 
his present deboisht and wicked condition, not reformed " &c. To my 
cousin Lawrence Hamond twenty pounds, to be paid when he shall be 
twenty years of age, and if he die before he come to that age my wife 
Elizabeth to dispose of it as she pleaseth. A provision for an augmenta- 
tion of this legacy. To such poor kindred as doth belong unto me and to 
my wife twenty pounds to be divided amongst them. To poor house- 
keepers in Portsmouth live pounds. To poor housekeepers in the Hamlet 
of Wapping in Middlesex, London, ivhere 1 formerly dwelt, five*. pounds. 
To John Greene five pounds for his care, helpfulness and assistance to my 
wife in the management of my business and settling my accompts, which 
he shall receive of her as soon as it is finished or at her discretion. My 
oldest son Francis Willoughby and my special friends Mr Maurice Thomp- 
son and Mr John Tailor to take upon them the charge and to be the over- 
seers of this my will <Scc. * 

John Greene and Laurence Ilamoml witnesses. Grey, 104. 

William Wii.lougiiijik of Portsmouth in the Co. of Southampton gen 1 , 
G D.'erinber 1.057, proved 5 March 1 658. J give to my dear and loving 
wife Mary Willoughbie my two dwelling houses situate and being in Ports- 
mouth, with the. malt house ami appurtenances, and all goods of mine what- 
soever freely to enjoy during the term of her natural life. And my will is 
that she should have all the abovementioned goods whatsoever with my 
little house in Watlington Street and. my malt house, with all appurtenances 
&c, to her and her heirs forever and my now dwelling house she shall have 
during the term of her natural life only. If my wife Mary Willoughbie 
doth marry again my will is that she should pay, upon the day of her mar- 
riage, or cause to be paid unto Jonathan WilldUghbie, my brother Wil- 
loughbie's eldest son, the sum of fifty pounds of currant English money. 
Item, my will is that then my wife should pay unto Nehemiah, my brother 
Willoughbie's son, the sum of fifty pounds &c, and that she, at the foremen- 
tioned day, pay to William Willoughbie, my brother Willoughbie's youngest 
son the sura of fifty pounds &c., provided that if any of these forementioned 
kindred of mine do die before the time appointed for payment of these 
legacies I have bequeathed them then my will is that the deceased's legacy 
should remain to my wife, provided moreover that though those foremen- 
tioned legacies be set to be paid at one set appointed time yet I leave the 
payment thereof, that is the time of payment, to the discretion of my over- 
seers. Item, my will is that after the decease of my wife my kinsman 















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121 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

William Willoughbie, my brother Willoughbie's youngest son, should liave 
my now dwelling house, garden and backside, with the appurtenances 
thereunto belonging to him and his heirs forever. And my will is that 
there should be paid by my wife, or her executors, fifty pounds &c. to the 
other three of my kindred foremen tioned, to each of them fifty pounds, this 
payment to be made after my wife's decease. I give to my brother 
Lydyate's son Timothie the sum of five pounds. I give to Henricke Lleff- 
ton the sum of five pounds with some of my wearing clothes, which my wife 
shall think fit. I give to my servant Susanna Trill five pounds. I make 
my loving wife Mary Willoughbie my full and sole executrix. Item, I 
would not have my wife exceed the sum of fifteen pounds for my funeral. 
I make my loving brother Willoughbie and my brother Lydiat overseers of 
this my last will and testament. 

Wit: John Beeston, 8am: Williams. Wootton, 188. 

Mary Rrickenden of Tile-hurst, Berkshire, widow, 29 May 1688, 
proved 13 June 1G88. I give and devise unto my nieces Mary James, 
spinster, and Anne James, spinster, daughters of my brother Mr. Philip 
James late of Portsmouth in the Co. of Southampton, mercer, deceased, 
and to their heirs and assigns for ever all that my house and late malt 
house, now used as a store-house or magazine, situate and being in Wack- 
lington Street in Portsmouth, now in the tenure or occupation of the r Master 
of the Ordnance belonging to the King's Majesty or his assigns, to hold to 
them the said Mary James and Anne James and their heirs &c. for ever, 
provided that the rents, issues and profits of the said house and premisses 
shall be received by my executors, hereafter named, during the minority of 
the said Mary and Anne and until they shall attain their several and re- 
spective ages of one and twenty years, these rents to be employed for their 
best advantage &c. I give unto my said two nieces fifty pounds apiece, to 
be paid I hem at their several ages of one and twenty years or days of mar- 
riage, which shall first happen, with legal interest for the same in the mean 
time, the legacy of the one dying before her legacy becomes due to go to 
the survivor of them. I also give them the old debenters of thirty pounds 
due to me for the rent of my said houses in Portsmouth. And I do give 
unto my said two nieces [\\q pounds apiece to buy them mourning. 

Item, I desire that my executors do pay the one hundred pounds which 
my first husband Mr William Willoughby gave unto his nephew Nehemiah 
Willoughby and to his niece Sarah Kempfeild to be equally divided between 
them upon my decease. I do desire tnat ray executors do pay the one 
hundred pounds which my last husband Mr. John Brickenden gave unto 
his sister Mrs Mary Halfheid in case she do outlive me. I give unto my 
niece and god daughter Mrs Letitia Maria Brickenden ten broad pieces of 
gold. I give unto my servant Elizabeth Trill, in case she do continue to 
live with me till my death, ten pounds of lawful money of England with 
all my woollen clothes and some part of my wearing linen. All the rest 
and residue of my personal estate, money, plate, rings, jewels &c. I hereby 
give and bequeath unto my niece Sirs .Sarah Norris, wife of Mr Samuel 
Norris, rector of Tilehurst aforesaid, and to my niece Mrs Margaret Lloyd, 
now wife of Mr. Nathaniel Lloyd. And I do hereby make and appoint 
the said Mr. Samuel Norris and Mr Nathaniel Lloyd to be joint executors 
of this nay last will and testament. I desire to be buried by my last hus- 
band at Englefield and that my funeral expenses may not exceed twenty 
pounds, f give the sum of thirty shillings to buy bread to be given to the 






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1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England, 125 

poor of Englefield at my 'funeral and also the sura of forty shillings to buy 
bread to be given at the same time to the poor of Tilehurst. Lastly I de- 
sire my loving neighbours Mr Thomas Mason of Sulham and my loving 
friend Mr. Richard Twitchin of Iuckpen to be overseers &c. Ex ton, 74. 

[I have had for many years the notes of wills of Col. William Willoughby 
and William Willoughby; his son, the father and brother of our Deputy Gover- 
nor Francis Willoughby. Only recently, however, have I come upon the will 
of Mrs. Mary Brickenden who, it is evident, had been the widow and executrix 
of the second William Willoughby. Her description of the house and malt 
house in Wacklington (or Watlinuton) street, Portsmouth, and her mention of 
her husband's nephew Nehemiah Willoughby, will be considered sufficient proof 
of that. She also mentions her former husband's niece Sarah Kcmpl'eild. This, 
of course, was that M daughter Camlield" mentioned in our Gov. Willoughby's 
will. It was my good fortune to Unci, a good many years ago, in the Office of 
the Clerk of the Courts for Middlesex County, Massachusetts, at East Cam- 
bridge, hi the Bundle of Court Papers for Sept. -Dec. 1G8.4 (Be Francis Wil- 
Joughby's executors vs. Laurence Hammond), a Bond of Francis Willoughby of 
Charlestown, merchant, given 1 February 1(><>7, unto Mrs. Parnell Nowell of 
Charleslown, in the sum of two hundred pounds, for the payment of one hun- 
dred pounds on the l 8t day of February 1(>(>8; signed 11V : Willoughby, witnessed 
by Latir. Hammond and Richard Waldron, assigned by Mrs. Parnell Nowell to 
her daughter Mrs. Mary Lang, the relict of Mr. John Long, 2G Dec. 1(18-1, and 
endorsed with a receipt by Parnell Nowell, July 7, 1(>7 1, in part payment from 
Mrs. Margaret Willoughby, fifty pouritiU. Attached to Gov. Willoughby's sig- 
nature was an impression of his armorial seal: Fretty: Crest, a lion's head 
between two wings expanded. This crest, differing from those usually given 
to the Willaughby families, was, I found, somewhat simifar to that given in 
Burke's General Armory (edition of 1878) to Sir Francis Willoughby, knighted by 
Sir Arthur Chichester, Lord Deputy of Ireland, 30 October 1610. Later, -finding 
that Mrs. Salisbury, of New Haven, Connecticut, was interested in this family 
and gathering all she could about them, I made known my discovery to her, 
referring also to Burke's General Armory, and at her request and by permission of 
the Clerk of the Courts for Middlesex, J secured the services of my friend Mr. 
Henry Mitchell, the well known seal engraver of Boston, who got a good im- 
pression and made an excellent fac-simile of the seal. I have since recalled to 
mind that I have seen an impression of the same seal (or one vastly like it), in 
the Probate Files either of Suffolk or Ersex Co., and it has been depicted in the 
Heraldic Journal (a copy of which 1 have not now at hand), as a seal bearing 
arms which had not then been identilied. 

In the same bundle of Court Papers to which I have referred, I found also a 
copy of the will of Mrs. Margaret Hammond, 21 August 1G80, and a Declaration 
of a Trust 12 May 10112., Thomas Prague of Southwiek, Co. of Hamps. Clark 
and William Webb, citizen and grocer of London, beginning — ''Whereas UVan- 
cis Willoughby of ye Cltty of London, Esquire, by one obligacon in writeing 
Under his hand and scale, bearing even date w th these presents, stands bound 
unto us, ye said Thomas Prague I& William Webb, in ye summe of fower hun- 
dred poundes for ye paiement of Two hundred poundes unto Margarett his wife, 
in case she should Survive him the said fl'rancis, or to such of the Children of 
ye said Margarett as sin; shall in her life tyme appoint by word of mouth or 
Avrifeing" &c», &c. This document was signed by Thomas Prague and William 
Webb, with their armorial seals attached, and witnessed by Nathaniel Camtleld 
and Nehemiah Willoughby. 

Many years ago, also, I found in the Registry of Probate at Salem (Essex Co. 
Prob. Keg. 303 L. 270) a copy of the will of John Arnald of London, in Thames 
Street dweller, mariner, but now resident in New England, in the town of Salem, 
and bound to sea, 12 October 1G80 (proved 28 January 109-1-5) who mentioned 
cousin Nehemiah Willoughby of Salem, referring to a legacy left by " my 
grandfather John Tailor of Woppin shipwrito" deceased, with legacies left to 
brothers Thomas and Samuel, both deceased, "falling to me their survivor." 
Ever since; I came to England 1 have kept a note of this at hand, hoping, some 
time or other, to come across that will of "John Tailor of Woppin shipwrite," 
the grandfather of John Arnald and possibly grandfather also of Nehemiah 
AVilloughby. It gives me pleasure now to present this will as well as that of 



12G Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

Thomas Taylor, his brother, and of Joane Locke of Wapping who mentions 
" my uncle John Taylor of Wapping." Hknky F. Waters.] 

Joane Locke of Wapping, "Middlesex, singlewoman, 10 October 1640, 
proved 20 June 1611. I give and bequeath to my loving brother Robert 
Locke the sum of twelve pounds to be paid him out of twenty five pounds 
in his own hands. I give to my sister Elizabeth Locke three pounds, to 
my sister Ruth Sparke three pounds, to my sister Anne Gwyn three 
pounds, to my sister Susanna Woodcocke two pounds, to my sister Faith 
Woodcoeke two pounds, to Edward Lester my cousin forty shillings, to my 
cousin Robert Lester forty shillings and to my cousin Judith Lester forty 
shillings. My five sisters' money, my will is, shall be paid out of the 
twenty five pounds that is in my brother's hand, within six months after 
my decease, and my cousins' to be paid when they come to age or at their 
day of marriage. I give to Catherine Rogers and Margaret Harrison 
twenty shillings between them. I give to my loving friend Mr. Thomas 
Spurdinge forty shillings for a sermon which 1 desire he may preach at my 
funeral. To my uncle Lock's daughter's son's child which 1 was witness 
to 1 give twenty shillings. I give to my friend Lucy Honor ten shillings 
and to Mrs Renall ten shillings. And I make and ordain my uncle John 
Tayler of Wapping my full and sole executor of this my last will and testa- 
ment. Evelyn, 77. 

p. 
Thomas Taylor of Wapping, Middlesex, shipwright, 15 December 

1658, proved 10 January 1058. Son Jonathan in the East Indies, whither 
he is gone on a voyage. Son Caleb Taylor. Son Jonathan's daughter 
Elizabeth (at one and twenty). His wife. My wife Sarah. My freehold 
lands, tenements &c. in Essex. M.y copy hold lands &c. in Essex". My 
fee farm rents arising out of the manor of Wighton in Norfolk. My lands, 
tenements &c. in and about llanworth in the said County of Middlesex. 
My adventure in the ship wherein son Jonathan went forth on the voyage. 
My wife to bring up son Caleb unti' he shall attain the age of one and 
twenty years. If the father of the intended husband of my daughter Han- 
nah Taylor shall (as hath been propounded) settle for my said daughter's 
jointure thirty pounds a year in lands or tenements &c. My daughter 
Ruth Taylor at marriage or age of twenty one. My daughter Wi lifter and 
her daughter lately born. My daughter Wilson and her child. My broth- 
ers and sisters children and my wife's sisters children. Master Matthew 
Chafey and Master Robert Lambe. To the church of Christ in Wapping 
whereof I am a member live pounds io be disposed of at the discretion of 
the said Blaster Chafey and Mr. Lambe. My apprentices Nathaniel Prest- 
land and Richard Gone. Master Hansard Knowles my son Caleb's school- 
master. Wife Sarah to be sole executrix and my brother Master John 
Taylor and my cousin Richard Arnold to be overseers. Fell, 8. 

[Youftg Caleb Taylor's schoolmaster, Mr. Hansard Knowles, or Knolles, is a 
person well known to those acquainted with the early history of New England. 

II. F. Waters.] 

John Taylor of Wapping, Middlesex, Esquire, 1 February 1660, proved 
18 February 1 669. I give unto my son John Taylorall that my mansion house 
wherein myself and lie now dwell and all those six new erected tenements 
on the Last side of the Dock yard, together with the Dock yard, cranes, 
storehouses &c. to the same freehold belonging, according to a former deed 
by which 1 did assure it to him and the heirs of his body by him lawfully 









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1894.] Genealogical Gleanings in TSngland. 127 

begotten on the body of Abigail his first wife, and for want of such heirs 
then to any other his children or others to whom he shall dispose it, and 
all deeds and writings that I have concerning the same premisses; all which 
premisses are situate, lying itnd being on the South side of Wapping Street 
in the parish of St. Mary Mattel Ion als Whitechapel and were by me lately 
bought, the one moiety thereof of John Dearsly deceased and the other 
moiety thereof of one William Startute, who purchased his part of Thomas 
Dearsly deceased, as by the writings and deeds relating to the same pur- 
chases will appear. I give all that my yard called the Reed yard situate 
on the North side of Wapping Street, which I bought of Mr. Warren, and 
do hold the same by lease for the tenu of four hundred years to come 
(or thereabouts), unto my grandchild John Taylor, and all deeds, assurances 
and writings concerning the same. Provided that if my said son John Tay- 
lor shall pay or cause to be paid to my said grandchild John Taylor the 
sum of Two hundred pounds when my said grandchild shall arrive to the 
age of one and twenty years or day of marriage, which shall first happen, 
then the Reed yard with the appurtenances shall come and be to my said 
son John Taylor &c. Hut if my said son shall refuse to pay the said sum 
of two 1 Hind reel pounds unto my said grandchild at the time herein before 
limited for the payment thereof and yet shall have desire to occupy and 
make; use; of the same yard then and in such case my will is that my said 
son shall pay the yearly rent of twenty pounds to my grandson for and 
during the time he shall so hold and U£e the same. But "if my said grand- 
child shall happen to die before such his arrival at age or marriage, and 
without issue of his body lawfully begotten, then and in such case I give 
the same to my said son John Taylor and the heirs of his body lawfully 
begotten &c., and, for want of such heirs, to such of my daughter Arnold's 
children as shall then be living (except my son John shall before his death 
give; or " aseertaine " to my daughter Arnold's children two hundred pounds, 
which if he do then it shall be lawful for him to dispose of the said yard at 
his pleasure). I give to my said son John Taylor and Rebecca his now 
wife my three filths parts of and in all those seveial houses, yard and 
dock, in Wapping, the fee simple whereof I lately bought (viz*.) one fifth 
part of Mr. John Woolhouse and the other two fifths of Mr. John Kemp- 
sail, to have and to hold to the said John Taylor and Rebecca his wife for 
their lives and that of" the longest jiyei of them and then to their children, 
part and part a. ike. But if my said son John happen to die without heirs 
of his body then I give and bequeath the reversion of the premisses (after 
the death of said Rebecca) to be equally divided among my said daughter 
Arnold's five children or those of them then living. 1 give to son John 
and his wife my right &c. in four houses Sec. which I hold by lease from 
Mr. John Catlin, being of the yearly rent of forty eight pounds, I give &c. 
to Elizabeth and Johanna, the daughters of my son Joseph Taylor four hun- 
dred pounds apiece, to be paid, for them, into the hands of Mr. Gregory 
Rage, Mr. Thomas llayter and Mr. James Porter, as trustees and guardians 
fill they shall arrive at the. age; of one or twenty years or be married. 
Other bequests to the said children. When disposed of in marriage or 
arrived at said age they are to have their portions if they carry themselves 
civilly, and not before. Provisions in case of their death. These children's' 
portions of eight hundred pounds shall be paid out of the debt of one 
thousand one hundred and seventeen pounds which is owing me from the 
City lor building the ship Loyal London &c. I give to my three grand- 
children Thomas, John and Samuel Arnold two hundred pounds apiece, to 



128 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

be paid into the hands of my said Trustees, one moiety thereof out of my 
casli in house and the other moiety out of my said City debt. The children 
to be paid at one and twenty years of age or marriage. To my grand- 
daughter Elizabeth Iladdilow one hundred and fifty pounds, and my will is 
that her husband Iladdilow shall have nothing to do with it. I give to Mary 
Arnold one hundred pounds over and besides what I gave her at the time 
of her marriage. To my grandchild John Taylor one hundred pounds at 
one and twenty or day of marriage. To my grandchild Abigail Jennings 
five pounds more than what she hath already had of me, to be paid her 
out of the said City debt. To my grandchild Rebecca Taylor, daughter 
of my son John, one hundred pounds at one and twenty or day of marriage, 
but if she die before then I give the same to her sisters and brothers if 
she then have any, and if none then to her mother. I give to Jonathan 
Taylor, son of niy son John, that one fifth part of the said houses, dock and 
yard which I also bought of the said John Kempsall and his mother in 
law besides the said first three parts of the same premisses above devised. 
Item, I give to my grandson Jonathan Willoughbie one hundred pounds, 
fifty pounds thereof to be paid within three months next after my decease 
out of my own money and the other fifty pounds out of my City debt. I 
give to Nehemiah Willoughbie fifty pounds and to William Willoughby 
thirty pounds and tin; sum of live pounds apiece to the two children of my 
son in law Mr Francis Willoughbie which he had by this his last wife. 
Item, whereas there is yet due unto me from and out of my brother Wil- 
loughbie's estate the full sum of sixty pounds. Now I do hereby give the 
same and all my right, title and interest therein to my three grand children 
Jonathan, Nehemiah and William Willoughby, to be equally divided 
amongst them. It is my further will and meaning that the legacies herein 
before given to my son Willoughbie's four children last before mentioned 
(that is to say) Nehemiah, William and his said two children by this his 
last wife, shall be paid unto them within ten months next after my decease. 
Provided always that their father, Mr. Francis Willoughby do first give a 
full and general release to my executors of all accompts, debts and demands 
whatsoever, except only in matters about the trade wherein I am concerned 
with Sir William Warren, touching which affair I desire Mr. Gregory Page 
to see that right be done unto me and my executors. I give to my grand 
daughter Sarah Camfeild the sum of sixty pounds to be paid unto her out 
my City debt so soon as the same can be received. I give and bequeath unto 
Owen Taylor the sum of ten pounds and to his brothers and sisters twenty 
shillings apiece. I give unto my cousin Caleb Taylor forty shillings and 
to each of my servants that shall be with me at the time of my decease 
twenty shillings apiece. I do give unto forty ministers in a list named and 
here inclosed twenty shillings apiece. I give unto M 1 '. Ryder ten pounds. I 
give twenty pounds to Captain Potter, William Hooper and Thomas French, 
to be distributed and disposed of by them and others of my Christian friends 
in VVapping, with whom in a special manner 1 walked, and had Christian 
society in my lib; time, being met together Ace. My executor to pay forty 
shillings lor a dinner to be had at such their meeting together upon that 
occasion. I give forty pounds to be distributed amongst poor suffering 
godly ministers who are laid aside and cannot hold their liberties for 
preaching whereby they got their livelihoods. To my daughter Rebecca 
Taylor thirty pounds as a token of my love to her. To my said three trustees 
ten pounds apiece as a token of my love to them. To my daughter in 
law Hannah ten pounds in case she survive two months next after 



1895.] 



Genealogical Gleanings in England. 



129 



my decease. To Mrs. Judith Bowrey and Mrs. Jorden ten pounds apiece. 
I make my son John Taylor executor. Penn, 29. 

[According to the foregoing will Mr. Taylor seems to have been the maternal 
grandfather of four of Gov. Willoughh^'s children, viz. : Jonathan, Nehemiah 
and William Willoughby and Sarah Camfleld. The two children of Gov. Wil- 
loughby by his last wife, referred to by this testator, were, I suppose, Francis 
and Susanna, who also, it may be noted, were mentioned in the will of their 
aunt Jane Locke, given in my Gleanings for July 1893 (11kg., Vol. 47, p. 418). 
Mr. Thomas Bragne, whose name appears in that Declaration of Trust which I 
have referred to, married Hannah Locke, another sister of Mrs. Margaret Wil- 
loughby. On pp. 415-410 of the same number of the Register may be found 
the will of John Dersley of Stepney, who mentions John Taylor of Wapping as 
occupying certain tenements in Wapping in which Mr. Dersley had an interest. 
He was undoubtedly the father of the John and Thomas Dearsly referred to 
in M r . Taylor's will and was the father, likewise, of Anne the wife of Mr. William 
Ting. As he mentioned also Capt. Edward Johnson and as the Johnsons of Kent 
were evidently connected with the Locke family, to which Gov. Willoughby's 
last wife belonged, I think I have, in these two groups of wills (i. e. those now 
presented and the wills given on pp. 415-418 of Reg. for July 1893) introduced 
the reader to an interesting connection of New England families. 

1 Unci that Admon. Avas granted 20 January 1G80 to Matthew Todd, principal 
creditor of Jonathan Willoughby, lately of the parish of St. Catherine, Coleman 
Street, London, but at Tangier, in the par f s beyond the seas deceased, to admin- 
ister the goods &c. of the said deceased, Elizabeth Willoughby, his relict, first 
renouncing. IIkniiy F. Waters.] 

Roger Cole of the parish of St. Saviour, Southward, Surrey, gen 1 . 2 
September 1G25, confirmed 14 July 1C26 in a codicil of that date, proved 
3 May 1G28. My wife Anne shall have all my lands, tenements and 
hereditaments &c. during her life, and after her decease I give my mansion 
house and the garden house belonging &c, now in my occupation, ill the 
said parish, unto Susan Lock my daughter, during her life, and after her 
decease to the children of her body lawfully begotten or to be begotten, 
equally amongst them or their lawful issue, charged nevertheless with five 
pounds yearly which I give to Mary Clemence my ancient servant, during 
her life, from and after the decease of my wife. I give the rooms &c, par- 
cel of the messuage now in the occupation of Katherine Simons widow, in 
the said parish which late were in the occupation of William Oland my 
late sou in law deceased, unto Elizabeth my daughter his late wife, during 
her life and after her decease to her lawfully begotten children. The rest 
of the said messuage I give unto Catalina Johnson my daughter, during 
her life, and after her decease to her lawfully begotten children. Pro- 
visional bequests to the Free Grammar School of the same parish, the poor 
of the College of the same parish and the poor of the Liberty of the Clink. 
All the deeds, evidences &c. concerning the said messuages &c. shall, after 
the decease of my wife, remain in the lu>nds and custody of my said daughter 
Susannna Lock for the good of the parties concerned. To my daughter 
Elizabeth an annuity of four pounds to be issuing out of my mansion house 
and garden house &c. 

In the Codicil ten pounds apiece to each of the three children of daugh- 
ter Elizabeth, like sums to each of the five children of daughter Susanna, 
forty shillings apiece (for rings) to sons in law William Lock, John John- 
son and William Ayscough, the seal ring "I usually weare " to cousin Ed- 
ward Cole of Winchester, forty shillings (for a ring) to brother Olave 
Masters &c. Wife Anne to be sole executrix. Barrington, 46. 

[The above testator was the M r . Roger Cole referred to in will of William 
Lock published in my Gleanings for July 1893 (Reg. Vol. 47, p. 417). He was 
the maternal grandfather of Mrs. Margaret Willoughby. II. F. Waters.] 

VOL. XLIX. 12 
























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130 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

John White ah Wampkrs late of Boston in New England, mariner, 
5 September 1G79, proved 1 October 1679. I do give, devise and bequeath 
unto my very loving kinsman John a Wonsamock, Pomhamell and Nor- 
warunnt all that my estate lying and being in New England, commonly 
called or known by the mime of Assenham East-stock, and all lands, plan- 
tations, &c — thereunto belonging &c, to have, hold and enjoy unto them 
and their heirs for ever, they and every of them observing &c. all such 
articles and conditions as my father and I have or ought to have observed 
&c. 

I give &c. to my very loving friend George Owen of the parish of S fc . 
Alhallowes the Wall {sic) in London, Chirurgeon, four hundred acres of 
that my land situate &c. in Bedford in New England, which said land doth 
abut upon the lands of Nicholas Warner. 

I give &c. to my very loving friends Edward Pratt of St. Paul, Shad- 
well, Middlesex, victualler, and John Blake of Plymouth in New England, 
husbandman, the rest and remainder of my lands, tenements, plantations, 
grounds, feedings, pastures and hereditaments whatsoever &c. &c. in the 
Country of New England or elsewhere. And I give tliem all my goods 
and chattels and make them joint executors &c. 

Proved by the oath of John Blake, one of the executors named in the 
will, to whom was administration &c, power reserved of making a similar 
grant to Edward Pratt, the other executor when he should come to seek it. 

h" .-•" King, 136. 

[In the Probate Act Book testator is called John White lately of Boston in 
New England, but on a voyage (in intintre) in the parish of Stepney, Middlesex, 
deceased. The reference to this will was given me by my late friend, Mr. 
Francis Grigson many years ago.v 71. F. W. 

This will is that of one who doubtless was one of the first of the pupils of 
John Eliot, the Apostle, lie was brought to Eliot by his father, also uamed 
Wampus, requesting he be educated by the English and taught to be obe- 
dient. The iirst part of the request seems to have been accomplished, as Wam- 
pus became proficient in English w r ays and customs. Through his knowledge 
of English his relatives and other Indians gave him authority to look after their 
land interests, and the attention he bestowed on the matter evidently gave him 
an idea that he had an ownership in the same, as evidenced by his will and vari- 
ous documents, among which may be mentioned those in the Mass. Archives, 
in which are given depositions on the subject by different Indians, as early as 
1672. His wife, whose name was Ann Praske, was the daughter of Romanock, 
the sachem of Aspatuck and Sasquaugh (Fairfield, Conn.), and through this 
marriage, which is recorded in the Boston records, he claimed rights there 
which were a subject of correspondence between the Connecticut authorities 
and the home government, and proceedings were pending in Connecticut at the 
time of Wampus's death. 

His wife Ann's estate was probated in Suffolk County, Mass., in 1G76, and the 
couple also had property in Boston, as evidenced by the Suffolk Deeds. 

The will mentions land in New England, which the writer of the will calls 
Assenham East-stock, this is Assanamascock of the Nipmug country, or the 
Hassanamisco Indian tract, and this is the key to the Sutton (Mass.) Indian 
grant, which solution evidently escaped the reverend authors of the history of 
that town. This bequest was the subject of much controversy in the Massa- 
chusetts General Court, and was dually settled in favor of the Indian grantees 
through the admission of the Dudley family to an interest and share in the 
grant. The fable of Sutton deriving its name from a Dr. Sutton who kindly 
ministered to Wampus on a return voyage from England, and that Wampus 
suggested the name through gratitude, hardly looks plausible, as Wampus had 
been dead a quarter of a century before Sutton received its name. 

Wampus was imprisoned in England for debt, in Massachusetts for riotous 
and unruly conduct, and breaking jail in Boston, created excitement at Cam- 
bridge meeting-house in King Philip's War by his behavior. 












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1805.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 131 

The story of his life and adventures make a more lengthy article than this 
note will allow, and seems to have escaped the notice of previous writers. Mr. 
Drake; in his History of the Indians, does not mention him, and Savage, in his 
Genealogical Dictionary, makes but a line of mention. 

Walter K. Watkins.] 

Washington (Register, vol. 43, pp. 379-424) : — 

[The Hartford Courant for September 30, 1894, has an article with the title 
" An Account of an Ancient Document with the Washington Arms," from which 
we quote : "The Courant \\vls the privilege of giving an account of two docu- 
ments of great interest and great value which have lately come into the posses- 
sion of James J. Goodwin, Esq. One of them bears the signature of a remote 
ancestor of General Washington as a witness to a deed of quit-claim, the other 
is a deed or lease executed by the same ancestor and his son, and bearing on 
one of its seals, in an admirable state of preservation, the Washington arms." 
Then follow some remarks on Mr. Waters's discoveries printed in the Register 
at the above reference, a description of the two documents, and remarks 
suggested by them. The deed with the Washington arms is a lease for two 
thousand years, on the payment of one red rose each St. John the Baptist's day, 
of land in Sulgrave. It is dated 43 Elizabeth and signed by Robert Washington 
and Lawrence Washington. "The deeds were found," says the Courant, "in 
searching among a heap of documents belonging to certain ladies, and a friend 
of theirs showed them to Mr. J. C. C. Smith of the Probate Registry, Somerset 
House, London Through Mr. Smith they came to their present owner." 

The Courant adds: "The New York Tribune of the l!)th instant gives from 
the London Times a long account by Ernest G. Atkinson, of certain depositions 
found in the Exchequer Records bearing on matters connected with the Wash- 
ington family. The first witness named is Anne Washington, widow of Robert 
Washington, and the name Pargitcr also occurs. The whole article is of in- 
terest, but if the writer had had before him the genealogical chart prepared by 
Mr. Waters which accompanies his paper, ... .he would have seen that he was 
looking for the descent of the emigrants of Virginia along a wrong Wag." 

Editor.] 

Auraiiam IIalsted of Rotterdam, merchant, 5 April 1651, proved 2 
May 1G51. I do ordain Darkes IIalsted my wife and William Schapes my 
brother, merchant, jointly executors and to choose a third person to their 
assistance as they shall agree upon. My debts first to be paid. To my 
wife Darkes one full third part of my remaining estate. One other third to 
my two sons Abraham and Isaac, equally to be divided between them. I 
give and bequeath unto my sister in New England live and twenty pounds 
sterling, and if she be dead to the nearestpf her friends there. To Rebecca 
Whitonian my wife's sister fifty pounds sterling. To the three children of 
William Cochroft deceased each ten pounds. To the poor of the church in 
general thirty pounds. To my wife's brother James Whiteman twenty 
pounds. My servant Lister. To the children of my brother Armye and 
brother Cocke (Cooke?) each child ten pounds. To my former wife's 
mother Mrs Rebecca King© five pounds. To the children of Mr Davies 
my father in law each live pounds. To my brother William Scapes twenty 
live pounds. To Gemi'liell his children each five pounds. 

Proved at London by the oath of Dorcas Whitman ah IIalsted, one of 
the executors &c. reserving power to the other executor. Grey, 88. 

Richard Cutt of Portsmouth in Piscataqua 10 May, 1675, proved 11 
July 1(582. To my wife Elinor Cutt my now dwelling house with the 
bake house, brew house, barn and all housing thereunto belonging, with log 
warehouse and wharfing (my storehouse warehouse only excepted), to- 
gether with my garden, orchard and all the land in fence in the home field 
adjoining to my house, as also my corn mill with my house and barns up at 
























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132 Genealogical Gleanings in England, [Jan. 

the creek, with all the upland and meadow thereunto belonging so far as 
homo unto that land which I bought of Ilubertus Mattoon (excepting the 
tan yard and the building thereunto belonging and the land on that side of 
the iloom). All these to my wife during her natural life and after her de- 
cease I give and bequeath the whole estate aforesaid unto my grandson Cutt 
Vaughan, to be to him and his heirs forever. And it shall come into -his 
hands at the age of twenty one years, with remainder to the next heir male 
and if there be no heir male then to the next heir that shall survive. To 
wife (certain household stuff) with all my stock of cattle and the five negro 
servants. To my daughter Margaret Vaughan my stone warehouse and 
that part of the wood field joining to that which was John Pickering's and 
reaching home to William Ilearls on the West with my brother John Cutt 
also on the West, the way that goes to the Creek on the North and Chris- 
topher Jose on the East, together with the tanyard, housing and stock 
therein and the little field on the South of the floome, always excepting and 
reserving the highway as it is now to the farm and to the other mill, which 
is to be kept free for the use of the mill and the houses by it ; all which I 
give to my daughter Margaret and her children, if they fail then to my 
daughter Bridget and hers. To my daughter Bridget and her heirs 1 give 
the remainder of that field commonly called the Great Field, to say all be- 
sides what is already given to her and her husband and already sold to 
sundry persons. I give her also that part of the wood field on the South 
of the highway unto the Creek as it is now fenced. The other part be- 
tween the highway and the creek her mother shall have liberty to use 
during her natural life; and that part also shall be Bridget's after her 
mother's decease. Likewise I give to Bridget my land in the Long Reach 
next to that which was Cap* Pendleton's, being thirty three 'poles broad 
front on the River and so back the whole depth; this to Bridget and her 
heirs, with remainder to the heirs jf her sister Margaret. To son AVilliam 
A^anghan my land on the great Island bought of Mr. Mason and that acre, 
given me by the town, which was laid out with an acre of Mr. Fryer's. I 
give him also two hundred pounds out of my estate and also my housing at 
the Isle of Shoals on Starr Island, together with that estate, both in stock 
and debts, that is in partnership with him. To beloved son Thomas Daniell 
two hundred pounds. To my grandson Cutt Vaughan one hundred pounds. 
To my grandchild Elinor Vaujjhyn the house and land I bought of Mr 
Mattoon, with that part of my land that comes from the Pulpit, the whole 
breadth of Mattoon's land till it come to my brother John Cutt's land on 
the North, together with two hundred pounds. To my grandchild Mary 
Vaughan two hundred pounds in money and the one hundred and fifty acres 
of land and the meadow belonging to it as I bought of Edward Hilton, as 
appears by bill of sale of John Wedgeits. 

I will further that what remains of my twenty pounds per annum, sub- 
scribed as a gift to the College for myself and sons, be carefully discharged 
by my executors. 

J give to my brother John Cutt ten pounds, to buy him mourning, and 
ten pounds to his wife and five pounds to each of his children. I give to 
my sister Anne Shipway ten pounas to buy her mourning, and five pounds 
to my brother Shipway and five pounds to his son John Shipway. I give 
to my brother Robert Cutts' widow and to each of his five children five 
pounds, as also I do forgive the debt due on my book. To Mr Joshua 
Moodey thirty pounds and to his five children ten pounds, i.e. forty shil- 
lings each. To my cousin John Hole and his wife live pounds each. To 












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1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 1 33 

the church of Portsmouth ten pounds to buy a piece of plate for the use of 
the church. "Wife Kliuiior and my two daughters Margaret ami 1 5 ridge t to 
he executors and brother John Cult, Mr Joshua Moodey and sons William 
Vaughan and Thomas Daniel overseers. 

John Wincoll and John Fletcher attest as witnesses. Cottle, 82. 

William Buck, of St. Martin's in the Fields within the City and 
Liberties of Westminster in the County of Middlesex, gentleman, 27 July 
1720, proved 2 January 1 72-1. To be privately but decently buried at the 

discretion of my loving wife Elizabeth Blick, I am possessed of six several 
messuages and tenements in St. James Street in the parish of St. James 
Westminster for a certain term of years yet to come and unexpired. I 
give the same to my wife, for life, charged nevertheless with the several 
payments mentioned in the last will of Mrs Jane Wilkinson late of St. 
James Westminster deceased, bearing date 20 July 1718, as follows; twenty 
five pounds per annum to Philadelphia Pope, wife of John Pope, for her 
life, and after her decease twenty pounds per annum to her husband -John 
Pope if he survive her, and also twenty pounds per annum to Ann Par- 
tridge, daughter of the said Philadelphia Pope and wife of John Partridge,* 
during her life, in case the said term of years in the said premises shall so 
long continue. And in ease my dear wife should die before the end of the 
said term I give the unexpired residue of said term to my son William 
Blick. [I give to my son W" Blick twenty pounds, to my eldest daughter 
Elizabeth Barnes wife of Daniel Barnes twenty pounds,, to my daughter 
Susannah Hlick twenty pounds, to my^son in law W in Richardson, son of 
m} r wife Elizabeth Blick by her former husband, five pounds. ]f I £ive to 
Elizabeth Godwin now in Virginia, daughter of my wife Elizabeth Blick 
by her former husband, ten pounds to pay for her passage back into Eng- 
land &.c. 1 give to my beloved friend William Cooke$ a gold ring, value 
ten shillings and also my cane with a black studded head. To my son 
William my linen and Woollen apparell. The residue to my wife Eliza- 
beth whom I appoint executrix &e. 

Then follows a deposition of one of the subscribing witnesses (dated 30 
December 172-1) certifying as to the several obliterations and alterations. 

Bomney, 1. 

I am indebted for reference to live above, as well as for others of the slime 
period, to 11. W. 1«\ llanvood, Ksq.— JIknuy F. Watkks. 

Agnks IIackiiam (of Membury) 20 February 1 GO"), proved 10 Decem- 
ber 1(108. To be buried in the churchyard of Membury. To m} r daughter 
Johane Palfrey my sidesaddle with a covering belonging to the same, my 
best gown, my second best petticoat, my second best partlett, my best apron 
and my second best waistcoat and fifty shillings in money, which sum is in 
the bunds of William Palfrey the now husband of the said Johane. I give 
to Manian Chipe my daughter my third best gown, my third best petticoat 
&.C. and fifty shillings in money. To Agnes Palfrey my daughter my second 
best gown, my fourth best parllett &c. &c. and fifty shillings. I give to 
Peter Palfrey, my daughter's son, one iron cronck. To my daughter Ellen 

* This bequest to Mrs. Partridge has been ruled through with n pea, nnrt on the margin 
of page hgahist it there is written " My grVtridHOii W ,u Blick, My grand daughter Elizabeth 
Nye* to Kli/t. Godwin now in Boston New Knglnnd." 

t TIh'm- heiniests within brackets have been ruled through with u pen. 

X This boniest fo William Cooke has also been ruled through. 
VOL. XL IX. 12* 4 



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131 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

&c. I give also to Agues and Marie (sic) my daughters one foslett of 
linen, to he divided betwixt them, and cither of them a holidays sinoek. I 
give to my four daughters four saucers of tin. to either of them one. The 
rest of mine apparel to my four daughters (equally). Gifts to sons in law 
"William Palfrey and Walter Ilackhain. My godchildren. The poor in 
Membury. Agnes Hackham, my son's daughter. Nicholas Bagbere, 
curate. Son Walter Hackham to be executor. 

Richard Davye a witness. Windebanck, 110. 

Edward Palmer, of London and late of Lefnington in the County of 
Gloecster Esq., 22 November 162d-, proved 15 December 1G24. To the 
parish church of Todenham, towards the reparations of the same and of the 
chapel belonging to Lemington house, commonly called the Place, in the 
parish of Todenham, where I was born, forty shillings. A seemly monu- 
ment to be erected in the same chapel for a memory of John Palmer Esq., 
my late grandfather, and of Mary his wife, sister of William Grivell, one 
of the Judges of the Common Pleas, and of Sir Giles Grivell, knight, both 
long since deceased. To my daughter Margaret Elton live pounds (in a 
piece of plate). To my daughter Mary a piece of plate of same value. 
Another to my daughter Charlton and another, to my daughter Ilutter. To 
my son Richard Palmer seven hundred pounds, in hope my said son will 
provide for tin; good education and maintenance of Bridget his only child 
and daughter. Reference to indentures between testator, Lisley Cave Esq. 
and others. Reference to the bargain and sale of the manor of Over Lem- 
ington, sold by my father to Richard Palmer of BeYton, gentleman, my 
wife's father. The manor of Nether Lemington sold by myself ^o the said 
Richard Palmer. Certain assurances and releases of the manor of Middle 
Ditehford to Ralph Sheldon Esq. from my father and others. Certain 
entails thereof heretofore made by my grandfather and my uncle William 
Palmer, sometime one of the gentlemen pensioners to King Henry VIII. 
and Edw. VI. The manor of Churchhill sold by my father to Sir Chris- 
topher llatton, knight. My son Giles Palmer to he sole executor, or, if ho 
die, then my son Thomas Palmer. For supervisors I appoint Sir Giles 
Overbury, knight, Sir Matthew Palmer, knight, George Lascells Esq., 

Laurence Maidewell Esq., Mr Lea, citizen of London, and Richard 

(Voltes, gentleman, to each of whom a ring of gold of four angels. And 
my will and mind is that if I shall happen to give unto my said sou Richard 
the sum of two thousand pounds or more out of my profits of Virginia and 
New England, then the seven hundred pounds (as aforesaid) shall not be 
■charged upon my personal estate &c. And as touching my castles, manors, 
lands, tenements and hereditaments which now or hereafter shall be built 
and erected in Virginia or New England in the parts beyond the seas I 
give the same to my son Giles &c. with remainder to my son Thomas &c, 
then to Edward Palmer only son of my brother William. And for default 
of all such issue males t^c. all the aforesaid castles, lands &c. shall be and 
remain for the founding and maintenance of an University and such schools 
in Virginia as shall be there erected and shall be called AC A DEMI A 
VIRGINIENSIS ET OXONIENSIS and shall be divided into several 
streets or alleys of twenty foot broad; and all such as can prove their law- 
ful descent from John Palmer Esq. of Lemington aforesaid, my 

grandfather deceased, or from my late grandmother, his wife, being sons, 
shall be there freely admitted and shall be brought up in such schools as 
shall be lit for their age and learning and shall be removed from time to 



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1805.] , Genecilhgictit Gleanings in England, 135 

time as they shall profit in knowledge and understanding. And further my 
will is that the scholars of the said University, for avoiding of idleness at 
their hours of recreation, shall have two painters, the one for oil colours and 
the other for water colours, which shall be admitted Fellows in the same 
College. And further my will and mind is that two grinders, the one for 
oil colours and the other for water colours, and also colours, oil and gum 
waters shall be provided from time to time at the costs and charges of the 
said College, beseeching God to add a blessing to all these my intents. 

By rde, 114, 

George Siiuiit of Bideford, Devon, merchant, 9 February 1G55, with 
a codicil dated G May 1657, proved 11 June 1658. To my sister in law 
Mary Shurt, widow, who was wife unto my brother John Shurt, and her 
heir all that house and tenement in the High Street wherein sometime 
Robert Chape (sic) lived, with the garden belonging, wherein 1 have granted 
an estate and term of two lives, and the rent thereof ten shillings per an- 
num, which house is in the possession of Robert Choape (sic) butcher. 

Item, I give and bequeath unto my brother Abraham Shurt now in New 
England, God send him home from thence to live in Bedford (sic)., all that 
new house and tenement &c. on the new Key, to hold for life after his re- 
turn. To my cousin John Efford the younger, now living and being in our 
house, that house &c. in High Street wherein Henry Amory now liveth. 
To my cousin George Efford, my godson, brother unto the said John, now 
being "tabled" with John Mugford in the parish of Abbotisham, the house 
&c. wherein William Davye lately lived, in the High Street, next adjoining 
unto the house on the High side {sic) "wherein my uncle Andrew did live 
sometime. My wife to be a mother to these two (John and George Erford) 
until of age. To the town of Bideford ten pounds to be lent to five poor 
artificers, forty shillings each for one whole year. To my cousin John Ford 
the elder of Burrington, to Dorothy, his wife, to my cousin Margery Pen- 
rose of Chumlye (sic) widow, my cousin Sibilla Curry, the wife of William 
Curry of Hols worthy, to each of them a gold ring of twenty five shillings 
with a death's head thereon. John Ford, the eldest son of the said John, 
and every other of his children. The children of my cousin Margery Pen- 
rose. The children of my sister Johane Purser deceased which lived in 
Brampton. My cousin Francis Facy of our town, town clerk, and Francis 
J lay don, my brother in law who married my wife's sister. Each of my 
apprentices. Edward Gurst, water bayliff of our town, and Johane Rigg 
widow. Master Johnson of our town who was schoolmaster therein. John 
Etl'ord the elder of Littleham. Master Shibber and Master Fetter, Doctor. 
Wife Margaret. Abraham Heyman, her son, now in the island Fayall. 
Richard Guy son unto George Guy of Torrington deceased, whose mother 
married with Master Richard Medford of Barnstable. My godson George 
son of Gabriel Shurt of Littleham. Wootton, 301. 

[Abraham Shurt, who is named by testator as a brother, was early at Pema- 
quid. See a valuable article on " Abraham Shurt and John Earthy," by the late 
Prof. John Johnston, LL.l)., in the Kegistkr for April, 1871, pp. 1*31-135. — 
Editor.] 

Kkmpo Syhada of London, mariner, 19 March 1658, proved 18 April 
1G50. To my daughter Anne Sibada, in case she shall prove a dutiful and 
obedient child unto her mother (my executrix hereafter named) fifteen 
pounds at age of twenty one, to be paid out of my estate in England, IIol- 






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130 Gcne<tlo()ic<d Glennhir/s in England. [Jan. 

land and other parts of tlio Low Countries. And concerning my lands, 
houses and plantations in Africa (To wit in New England and Jameco {sic), 
I give one eighth part thereof to my said daughter, when the same shall he 
obtained and recovered (less the proportionate cost of collecting &c). My 
loving friends Capt. John YVentworth of Bermudas, at present residing in 
London, mariner, and John Penny of London, mariner, commander of the 
good ship called the America, to he overseers and ffeoffees in trust of this 
niv will. The residue to wife Mary, whom I appoint sole executrix. 

Pell, 189. 

[I am indebted to Mr. W. S. Appleton for the reference to the above -will, 
and also to that of George Shurt. II. F. Waters.] 

George Rayment of the parish of St. John's in Glaston in the Co. of 
Somerset, 2G June 1651* proved 30 October 1651. My body to he buried 
in the churchyard of St. John's &c. To my daughter Dorothy Robyns 
and her child forty shillings, and all the goods that 1 have in the house that 
I lived in, in the churchyard, I give to said daughter Dorothy Robins, and 
ray best breeches and jacket and my best shoes to my daughter Dorothy's 
husband of Streete. To the wife of my son Maurice Rayment and her 
child forty shillings. 

Item, I give and bequeath to William Rayment my son that is in New 
England six pounds, to be paid if ever he doth come to Glaston to demand 
it. Item, I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Rayment my daughter that is 
in New England twenty shillings, to he paid if ever she doth come to 
Glaston to demand it. To John Seemer, the son of William Seemer, 
twenty shillings. To Luce Seemer. the daughter of William Seemer of 
the said Glaston, twenty shillings. Twenty shillings I give to discharge 
my funeral expences. All the rest of my goods &c. I give to Maurice 
Rayment my son, whom I make my whole and sole executor. For over- 
seers T do appoint William Seemer and William Hillocks. (Then follows 
the date.) Item, I give to John Rayment my son that is in New England 
one shilling. 

The witnesses were William Seemer, William Zealee (by mark) and 
George Rosier. Grey, DG. 

| Hero \\e have the family of William and old John Rayment of Beverly, "well 
known to searchers of the records at -Salem. And I am glad to see the spelling 
conform to the pronunciation as L remember it from earliest childhood. Present 
representatives of that family now write their name Raymond. There was a 
Richard Raymond of Salem, who lived on the south side of Essex Street, and 
afterwards removed to Norwalk and Saybrook. But I have never seen the 
slightest evidence of a relationship between him and these Rayments of Beverly. 
The above will confirms me in this. I cannot, here and now, without my Essex 
Co. notes, tell what became of Elizabeth Rayment, the sister of William and 
John, who also went to New England. Perhaps some of my friends at home 
(for instance the Ron. John I. Raker) may be able to tell us. John Rayment, 
I believe, succeeded to the ownership .of the farm belonging once to Thomas 
Scruggs, one of the Old Planters, and the old Rayment house (I hope) stands 
there to-day. I have often passed it in my walks. IIknby E. Wa'i i:i:s.] 

Thomas Smith of West Clandon, Surrey, yeoman, 13 June 1G51, proved 
28 October 165T. To the poor of West Clandon fifty shillings and to the 
pooi- of Cranley, Surrey, fifty shillings. Item, I give and bequeath to my 
brother John Smyth, now in New England (if he shall be then living) sixty 









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1895.] , Genealogical Gleanings in England. 137 

pounds within one year after my decease, and in case lie be dead before 
that time 'then I give the said sixty pounds to my cousin Rachael, daughter 
of my said brother John Smyth, and to her heirs, to be paid within one 
year &c. To my sister Susanna, widow of my brother Jeremy Smyth de- 
ceased, five pounds (in one year); To my cousin Richard, son of my brother 
John Smyth, five pounds (in one year). To my cousin Thomas, son of my 
brother Jeremye Smyth deceased, fifty pounds (in one year). To my 
brother William Smith fifty pounds, in one year, if he shall then be living, 
but if not then his wife shall have ten pounds of it and the other forty 
pounds shall be equally divided between the children of my brothers John 
and Jeremie aforesaid, to be paid in one year &c. To each of my god- 
children two shillings and six pence, to be paid within half a year &c. I 
do appoint my cousin Jeremy Smith, son of my brother Jeremy deceased, 
my sole executor, to whom all the residue, and if he be dead then his chil- 
dren shall be joint executors. My very loving friends Mr Thomas Mascall 
of West Clandon and Richard Ticknor of Holhurst in the parish of Cranley 
to be overseers. And 1 bequeath unto either of them fifty shillings for their 
pains and such necessary charges as they shall be at. 

Proved at London, by the oath of Jeremy Smith the nephew and only 
executor named in the will. Grey, 197. 

Samuel Hitchins, citizen and draper of London, 16 March 1676, with 
a Codicil made 27 July 1679, proved,! December 1679. To my dear and 
loving wife Sarah my two messuages &c. in the parish of St. Lawrence old 
Jewry, London, which I hold by lease from the Company »of Cloth workers, 
and if she die before the expiration of the term &c. then to my son Giles 
Hitchins or to my grandson Robert Hitchins, which of them my said w ; fe 
shall think fit to give or bequeath the same. To wife my freehold mes- 
suages in Robin Hood Court, St. Mary Aldermary, London, and the rents 
&c. for her life, and then to my grandson Robert Hitchins, remainder to 
son Giles Hitchins and next to my two nephews Daniel and Joseph Hitchins 
(sons of my brother Daniel Hitchins) who are now living in New England 
near Boston. To my loving brother Daniel Hitchins one annuity of ten 
pounds for life, payable quarterly. To my nephew Nathaniel Hitchins one 
shilling in full discharge of all claims &c. To my son Giles Hitchins my 
freehold messuages tike, in All Hallows Barking. Reference to stock and 
credits abroad. The said messuages to be chargeable with the ten pounds 
per annum given to my brother Daniel and also with the payment of one 
and thirty pounds per annum unto my loving cousin Robert Hitchins for 

and daring the term of his natural life, according to certain writings be- 
ts ' O P> 

tween the said Robert and me. To my said brother Daniel and my said 
cousin Robert to each of them four yards of black cloth to make them 
mourning. To my said cousin Robert and to my loving friends M 1 ' Daniel 
Morse and Nicholas Morse, son of the said Daniel, twenty shillings apiece 
to buy them rings. The residue to wife Sarah, with five pounds to buy her 
mourning. My said cousin Robert and my friends Daniel and Nicholas 
Morse to bo executors. -King, 161. 

[Here we have indicated plainly enough the Daniel and Joseph Hitchins whose 
names art; to be found on the records of Lynn, Massachusetts, and of Essex 
County, at Salem. IlKNUY F. WATERS*] 

Mary Coquell alias Le Mercier dwelling in the town of Rochell, 
widow of the late Martin Vander Bist merchant, also there dwelling, her 









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138 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [Jan. 

will made 27 February 1G08 (and translated out of the French) proved 3 
November 1631. My body to my friends and kindred to the end they may 
take care for my burial, with credit and ceremony requisite to a woman 
of my quality, according to the form and custom of the Reformed Church, 
whereof I do make profession. To the poor of this place if I die in this 
town to the poor of the French Church fifty L. tournois. To the poor of 
the Hospital fifty L. tournois. More to the advancement of the ministry 
fifty L. tournois. More to the box of the Dutch poor fifty L. tournois. 
More to the son of late Henry Vanlo my godson forty L. tournois, if he 
die nothing. More to the son of Quemond Van Wert, also my godson, 
forty L. tournois, if he die nothing. Similar bequests to Hellen Vanlo, my 
late husband's god daughter and to the son of John Chanan, named Gyles, 
my godson. To the son of the widow Bloc, named John, also my godson, 
one bundled Lyvers, and if he die and that his mother be living the same 
shall be given unto his said mother, for she hath many children. More to 
a girl which doth serve me named Rachel de la Loy, in respect of the love 
which I do bear her, I do also give her one hundred L. tournois, if she die 
nothing. More unto Mr and Mrs de Vogel dwelling in this town, in regard 
of the good and hearty friendship which we have borne one another, I do 
give them fifteen hundred Livers to give unto their children, which as seven 
in number, unto every one of them two hundred Lyvers and one hundred 
Livers unto the said M rls de Vogell, and unto her my diamond cut " fasset" 
which I do wear upon my little finger, and whether any of their children 
do die or not I do will and understand that the said sum of fifteen hundred 
Lyvers shall be given unto them for the bettering of the' part of the others 
or so much as shall be to remain unto the fathers or mother, and if tiie said 
M ris de Vogel do die the said diamond shall be given to one of their daugh- 
ters, that is to say to Sara or Katharine or Anne, and if one die the other 
shall succeed, or unto Susan if the Others be dead, who is also their sister, 
fifteen hundred L. And if the said Mr and Mris de Vogell do die I pray 
you enquire where their said children are, to the end you may cause the 
said sum and the said diamond to be delivered unto them. More unto the 
nephew of my late husband, named Martin Vander Bist, who hath dwelt 
with us from the age of seven or eipht years, in regard of the love that I 
do bear him I do give him five hundred Lyvers tournois and a ring of his 
deceased uncle's set with a red stone cut like a " harte " which did serve 
for a seal to his said uncle, and if he die nothing to his heirs. 
Moreover to my brethren and sisters. 
First unto my brother Paul le Mercier who hath not any charge and is 
not married, being by the grace of God in very good estate, and hath not 
any need of my succession but for remembrance of me, I do give him my 
great diamond which is set in a ring of gold and which I wear upon my 
first finger, being a stone which hath been always esteemed at five hundred 
Livers. More unto my brother Peter le Mercier in regard he is unaccom- 
modated I do give unto him for his daughters, if he have any, if not unto 
his hoi is, two thousand and live hundred Livers tournois and unto my said 
brother a Turky, which is a ring with a little blue stone, which 1 wear on 
my little linger. More unto my brother Francis le Mercier, who is not 
married, I do give unto him one Gimboll ring of two rings and is round, I 
do wear it on my first finger, and eighteen hundred Livers Tournois. More 
unto my brother Daniel de Le Mercier, who is married, I do give him a 
Gimboll ring of three lings, which is a ring which I wear on my finger 
next my little finger. I do also give him eighteen hundred Livers tournois, 



1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 139 

and because it is not long since lie was married and that ho cannot have 
many children and that I hope without doubt that he will endeavor to ad- 
vance himself by the vocation wherein it hath pleased God to set him, 
whom 1 do pray to bless him and us all, I do refer to the discretion of you 
my brethren, executors of this my Testament by the grace of God, to give 
him a part of this my gift or to put it forth at profit for his daughters in 
case he have any, if not, his sons, its you shall find good. More unto my 
sister Jane le Mercier, the wife of my brother Priaux, I do give unto her 
my saphire, which is a ring which I wear on the finger next the little finger 
and is like a diamond. Also I do give unto her for her daughters or sons 
I do likewise refer to your discretions in regard she hath many children, 
how be it, God be praised, she is in good estate, nevertheless I do give unto 
them eighteen hundred Livers for the advancement of her said children. 
More unto my sister Elizabeth Le Mercier who is a widow, and, God be 
praised, also in very good estate and hath not any great charge of children, 
I do give unto her my ruby, which is a ring which I wear on myi'first 
finger, and unto her daughters one thousand Livers tournois, or in default 
of her daughters unto her or her sons as you shall find good, for her eldest 
son, named John, is already well provided for of his father's goods and 
therefore it seemeth unto me to advance her son Paul in case his sisters do 
die, 1 do refer it to the two executors of my said Testament. More unto 
my sister Judith le Mercier a little diamond which is on a ring which I 
wear on my first finger and unto lip" for her daughters, in case she have 
any, if not, to her sons eighteen hundred Livers tournois. More unto my 
sister Anne Le Mercier in regard I have brought her up with me I pray 
you my brethren and sisters take'it not ill in case I do advantage and pre- 
fer her before you in regard of the good and faithful service which she hafh 
done mo, I being not able to do it when she was married in regard I was 
under the Law of my late husband having not since that time wanted alfec- 
tion towards her but power, which I do desire to witness unto her in this 
my last will, J do give unto her for her daughters, or in default of daugh- 
ters unto her sons, the sum of three thousand Livers tournois and unto her 
my ewer of silver gilt and my little silver cup which my godfather gave me 
(and other articles). More unto her daughter Mary, my god daughter, 
five hundred Livers tournois and a little ring of gold which I do wear upon 
my little linger, which her mother gavj me when she was married, being a 
love ring of gold, also my silver girdle with all those things which depend 
thereupon. And if her said daughter Mary do die and that she have not 
any other daughters my said girdle shall be given unto the eldest daughter 
of my sister Hester and my said sister Ann shall inherit or have the five 
hundred Livers and the said ring. More unto my sister Hester le Mercier 
my pointed diamond, which is a ring which I wear on the finger next my 
little finger, and eighteen hundred Livers Tournois for her daughters in 
case she have any, if not, to her sons. God bless you all and me. More- 
over if it shall happen that any of my brethren or sisters do die without 
children I do desire that that which I have bequeathed unto them shall re- 
turn amongst you my brethren and sisters to be equally divided amongst 
you unless any amongst you were unaccommodated and that those which 
are in good estate did assign or give them their part of their free will. 
And if the fathers and mothers of the children of my brethren and sisters 
here before mentioned be in good estate I desire that the interest of the 
money be added to the principal sum of the said children for the augment- 
ing of the said sum for the said children, but if their fathers or mothers be 






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140 Genealogical Gleanings in England, [Jan. 

unaccommodated the said fathers or mothers shall enjoy the said interest 
for the bringing up of* their said children in the fear of God, which God 
grant. I do will and understand that my said brethren and sisters here be- 
fore named shall be heirs of their children but I will not, if any of my said 
brethren do die without children, that the succession which they shall have 
had or enjoyed by me shall go to their wives or out of the " Linage " nor 
also if any of my sisters do die without children they may not give the said 
succession unto their husbands but I will that the same shall return amongst 
those which shall remain of you to be given to your children and that you 
share all equally together. Moveables to be sold to make up these sums 
if not ready money enough. And if it shall please the Lord so much to 
favour us as to give us peace and that I can be wholly out of the business 
and that I knew what were due unto me for some unclear parcels, as you 
shall perceive by an extract herein enclosed, I might (God willing) more 
amply and clearly declare my will. And when I shall have news that my 
moveables sent into your quarters are well arrived I may also (God willing) 
dispose of my said moveables, plate and apparrell belonging to my head, 
but until then I leave the same undisposed, for the making up of the said 
sums &c. 

Now the reason that I do rathe give unto my nieces than unto my 
nephews is that the fathers and mothers which do love their children ought 
to have a care to cause their sons to learn some honest vocation to the end, 
with the help of God, in time to attain unto that which shall be praise- 
worthy, for ordinarily daughters are not employed in such vocations, and 
specially those which are come of good families, unless 'necessity do there- 
unto urge them and therefore when they have some thing for their mar- 
riage they are sought after by honest men, howbeit I will not give "his 
vanity unto myself that that little which I give them may greatly advance 
them but I prais God lor his goodness which he hath done unto me and do 
pray him with all my heart to continue them unto me in his blessing and to 
his honor and glory the salvation of my poor soul and the edification of my 
neighbor, in all charity beseeching hi.n also to give me grace to live and 
die in his fear and to grant me his heavenly kingdom at the end of my 
days and that my brethren and sisters, nephews and nieces and others my 
friends may after my death enjoy thereof in all prosperity and blessings of 
God to the grace and salvation of Mieir souls. Amen. 1 do pray my 
brother Paul Le Morcier and my brother Francis Le Mereier to be execu- 
tors of this my Testament, for my brother Peter Le Mereier doth not dwell 
in those places but in Ireland; God give us all grace to do well, and if I do 
not die here the two hundred Livers which 1 do give unto the poor I do 
will that the same be given to the poor of the church of Hampton in Eng- 
land. 

Proved by the oaths of Paul and Francis Le Mereier, Letters of Admin- 
istration which had been granted to the said Paul 22 September 1628 as if 
she had been intestate having been first brought in and renounced. 

St. John, 120. 

[Here we have the whole family of Mercers already referred to (Reg. Vol. 
47, pp. 511-514:) but bearing a French name. They may have migrated to 
Southampton either from France itself or from the Channel Islands, from 
which the allied family of Pryaulx seem to have come. We find here Paul, 
Peter, Francis, Daniel, Jane (Pryaulx), Elizabeth ( Blan chard ) , Judith (Johnson), 
Anne (Strowde?) and Hester (Bachiler), only the testatrix, like a Frenchman, 
refers to his sisters by their maiden family names, not by those acquired through 
marriage. — II. F. Waters.] 






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NEW-ENGLAND 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 
REGISTER. 



APRIL, 1895, 



SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF HON. JOHN CHANDLER. 

John Chandler, the subject of this sketch, was the third child 
of Hon. John Chandler, of New London, Ct., by his wife Hannah, 
daughter of John Gardiner, the third proprietor of Gardiner's Island, 
in the province of New York,* who was a grandson of Lieut. Lion 
Gardiner, the author of the "Relation of the Pequot Warres," 
published in the 23d volume of the Massachusetts Historical Society's 
Collections. 

When about eleven years old his father removed to Worcester, 
Mass., and soon gained the confidence and respect of his neighbors 
in his new home, where "he held the principal county offices." 
The son was honored in like manner. He was town treasurer from 
1753 to 1760 ; town clerk from 1764 to 1768 ; and county treasurer 
from 17(52 to 1765. He held the office of sheriff of Worcester 
County from 1751 to 1762, and was Judge of Probate from 1762 
to 1774. He was a colonel in the militia, and served in the French 
war. On the alarm in August, 1757, for the relief of Fort William 
Henry, he marched as colonel of a regiment. Dr. Chandler prints 
the following extract from the Boston J\ r ews- Letter of Oct. 16, 
1760: "We hear frbni Worcester that on the evening of the 9th 
inst. the house of Mr. Sheriff Chandler, and others of that town, 
were beautifully illuminated, on account of the success of his Majesty's 
Arms in America." \ This illumination was in honor of the capture 
of Montreal by Lord Amherst, September 8, 1760. 

Lincoln, in his History of Worcester, speaking of him, says : 
"He succeeded to the military, municipal, and some of the*judicial 
offices of his father, and inherited the characteristic traits of his 
ancestors. He was cheerful in temperament, engaging in manner, 
hospitable as a citizen, friendly and kind as a neighbor, industrious 
and enterprising as a merchant, and successful as a man of busi- 
ness." \ 

* Lion Gardiner and his Descendants, by Curtiss C. Gardiner, 1890, page 112. 
t Chandler Genealogy, by George Chandler, 1883, p. 228. 
X Lincoln's Worcester, 1862, page 231. 
VOL. XLIX. 13 









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142 John Chandler. [April, 

At the beginning of the Revolution lie adhered to the Crown. In 
1774 he was obliged to leave his family at Worcester and take 
refuge in Boston. "In 1776," says Sabine, "he accompanied 
the Royal army to Halifax, and two years after was proscribed and 
banished." * Dr. Chandler, in his Chandler Genealogy, says that 
he "was one of the six inhabitants of Worcester that were included 
in the act of banishment forbidding the return of the former citizens 
of the State who had joined the enemy ; requiring them, if they once 
revisited their native country, forthwith to depart, and denouncing 
the penalty of death if they, should be found a second time within this 
jurisdiction. Of these six, were his sons Rufus and William, his 
brother-in-law .lames Putnam, and his nephew Dr. William Paine. 
His son William and Dr. William Paine had permission and did 
return to Worcester. Dr. Paine regained the confidence and long 
enjoyed the respect and esteem of the community." f "I am 
assured," says the Hon. Lorenzo Sabine, "that while he was at 
Boston he Avas supported for a considerable time by the sale of silver 
plate sent him by his family, and that when he left home he had no 
intention of quitting the country. . . . His adherence to the 
Crown, and his departure for England, seem to have been his only 
offences ; yet he was treated as harshly as though he had borne arms 
in the field. The late President Dwight spoke of Colonel Chandler 
and his family as distinguished for talents and virtue. He repre- 
sented to the Commissioners of Loyalist Claims that the losses of 
real and personal estate were £11,067 sterling, and of business, 
offices, etc., about £6,000 sterling more. His statement was so 
moderate, in comparison with many others of the same nature, that 
he was allowed the full amount, and was afterwards known in Eng- 
land as f thc honest Refugee.' " \ In 1783, he had £50 added to 
his allowance, and this at a time when the sum paid to Refugees 
was reduced from £80,000 to £38,000. § He died at London Sept. 
26, 1800, in the eightieth year of his age. lie was buried at 
Islington, where a monument with a suitable inscription marks his 
grave. 

Hon. John Chandler married first March 4, 1740-1, Dorothy 
Paine of Worcester. She was born July 20, 1723, and was a 
daughter of Col. Nicholas Paine, of Bristol, R. I., and his wife 
Sarah, daughter of Timothy Clark, of Boston. His wife Dorothy 
died at Worcester, October 5, 1745. He married second June 11, 
1716, Mary Church, daughter of Col. Charles Church, of Bristol, 
R. I . She died at Worcester Sept. 18, 1783". His children by his 
first wife Dorothy, were : 1, John ; 2, Gardiner ; 3, Clark ; 4, Doro- 
thy, married Samuel Ward, of Lancaster. By his second wife, 
Mary, he had : 5, Rufus ; 6, Gardiner ; 7, Nathaniel ; 8, William ; 

* Sabine's Loyalists, 1864, Vol. I., p. 303. 

t Chandler Genealogy, page 230. 

t Sabine's Loyalists, Vol. I., p. 304. 

$ Syinuei Curvvin quoted in Chandler Genealogy, page 229. 



1895.] Col Job Vushing. 143 

9, Charles ; 10, Samuel ; 11, Sarah, m. John Stanton, Jr. ; 12, 
Mary, in. William Seaver Jr. ; 13, Benjamin ; 14, Francis ; 15, Lu- 
cretia, m. Rev. Aaron Bancroft, and was mother of Hon. George 
Bancroft the historian, and of Eliza, wife of lion. John J)avis, 
governor of Massachusetts ; 10, Thomas ; 17, Elizabeth, mvEben- 
I ezer Putnam of St. John, N. B. 

Jonathan Peele Dabney, A.M., said of him and his family: 
"The Hon. John Chandler, of Worcester, whose sons and daugh- 
ters were as numerous. as those of his Royal Master, and with whose 
family every other leading family of the region was proud to entwine 
itself by marriage alliance, sleeps far from the town and shire of 
whose honors he had almost the monopoly."* 

The compiler of this sketch is chiefly indebted for the materials 
used by him to : 1, The Descendants of William and Annis Chand- 
ler, by George Chandler, M.D., Worcester, 1883 ; 2, Biographical 
Sketches of Loyalists of the American Revolution, by Lorenzo 
Sabine, 2 vols., Boston, 1864; 3, The History of Worcester, 
Mass., by William Lincoln, Worcester, 1862. 



COLONEL JOB CUSHING. 

Communicated by Geo. A. Gokdon, A.M., of Somerville, Mass. 

In the archives of the State Department of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, vol. exeviii., p. 131, may be found the original 
of this interesting and important letter, written in the darkest period 
of the American Revolution, so far as New England was concerned — 
thill immediately preceding the battles of Bennington and Saratoga. 
The volume containing it is numbered 6 in the series of Revolu- 
tionary Letters : 

Bennington Sept. 5, Mil.. 
Gentlemen 

Your favour of the 20th ultimo I have | received and agreeable 

to your request have used | my influence with both the officers and men of 
my | regiment to have them continue in service for the further term | of 

three months. It would have given me fjie | greatest pleasure, had my 

success, been equal to my | wishes in this respect. The other Gentle- 
men field | officers, who are willing to remain with me, endeavour | ed by 
every argument in their power to persuade them | to it and to convince them 
that the good of the service not only | required, but that it might he pro- 
bably much to their | interest, as undoubtedly many of them, should they 
go, | would be obliged immediately to return. 

Every argument has proved ineffectual nor do | I think they could 

* Chandler Genealogy quoting the Christian Examiner, July, 1847, p. 120. 



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144 Col. Job Cashing. [April, 

have been prevailed on, had they [.been certain of being draughted imme- 
diately on their | return The disagreeable situation in which they | 

left, (many at least) their farms, joined to that dis | content which ever 
prevails among troops in our j circumstances, who view themselves under no 
obliga | tion, were arguments too powerful for my | authority or persuation 
to overturn. | 

Six only have tarryed with me Viz Joseph Preast of | Luneng- 

burg Zebediah Green & Elijah Houghton of West | minster • 

Silas Spanlden of Ashbumham, James | Burtt of Harvard and Silas 

Whitcomb of Bolton. | 

I am Gentlemen with great 

regard your most obedient 

humble Servant 



Job Gushing 



Hon We Council of Mass ts Bay 



Superscribed The Hon ,,le 

The Council of the State of Massachusetts Bay 

Endorsed * 

Letter from Col Job f Cushing 

Sept. 5, 1777. 

The existence of this letter was discovered by Prof. James Davie 
Butler, LL.D., of the University of Wisconsin, during his exten- 
sive researches regarding the battle of Bennington. Prof. Butler 
says he "has 'stayed the very riping of the time' for publishing this 
letter, which authenticates a valuable page in history. Fortified 
with this document descendants of Elijah Houghton, Silas Spauld- 
ing, James Burt, Joseph Priest and Silas Whitcomb may secure 
standing on an envied roll of honor. Moreover, the letter, which 
now first goes to press, shows these livn men ami Zebediah Green to 
be ouch worthy of a monument ; since they were six veritable Abdiels 
1 faithful found among the faithless — faithful only they,' — nor number, 
nor example, with them wrought." The triumphant issue of that 
campaign relieved the New England States from the heavy hand of 
the draft. Her sons, after Saratoga, enlisted in the Continental 
regiments, and service at home was confined to the custody of 
prisoners. 

Col. Cushing's command was raised in Shrewsbury and neighbor- 
ing towns in the northern section of Worcester county. The town of 
Shrewsbury, in the enthusiasm accompanying the provincial resist- 
ance to the parliamentary acts, had voted to raise three companies 
of infantry. It was impossible to do so ; but two were raised, one 
in the north precinct of the town, now Boylston, and one in the 
south precinct, which still bears the original name of the town. 
These companies were officered and enlistments made. When the 
call came for action, known as " the Lexington Alarm," even these 






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1895.] Col. Job Cushivg. 145 

two companies were found deficient, and were consolidated into one 
company under Job Gushing as captain. It went forward to Lex- 
ington, arriving after the British had reached Boston. Jt formed a 
portion of Gen. Ward's command, was stationed at Cambridge, 
where it remained as a reserve throughout the battle on Bunker Hill. 
The company saw service during the siege of Boston. After the 
evacuation it accompanied the Continental army under Gen. Wash- 
ington to the Hudson river. 

The activity of the British general, Lord Howe, kept the Ameri- 
can commander busy on the lower Hudson. This left the entire dis- 
position of military events at the northward to Generals Lee and 
Gates, who soon found themselves threatened by the march of Gen. 
Burgoyne with a well-appointed army from Montreal. To meet 
this emergency an earnest call was made upon the New England 
States for new levies to strengthen the northern army. It was this 
force, rendezvoused at Bennington, which dishing, now Colonel, 
was endeavoring, in accordance with instructions from the Massa- 
chusetts Conned, to recruit. This letter tells more eloquently than 
is otherwise possible the lamentable result. At the same time,, it 
places on indelible records the names of the six brave men who 
stood true to the cause in the hour of extreme peril. After the 
surrender at Saratoga, Col. Cushing followed the 'army down the 
Hudson, and was on duty at West Point under Arnold. His regi- 
ment was included in the contemplated betrayal to the British. 

Col. Cushing was a, son of Rev. Job Cushing, the first settled 
minister at Shrewsbury, a native of llingham and a graduate of 
Harvard, and his wife Mary, daughter of i\ev. John Prentice of 
Lancaster. Job jr. Avas born I January 1728, and married in 1752, 
Lucy, daughter of liev. Isaac Stone of Pramingham. After the 
Revolution he returned to his native town, Shrewsbury, where, on 
the edge of the common, he built a house, and there for many years 
kept a, village tavern, at which his old commander, General AYash- 
ington, is reported to have been a guest when on his Ts T ew England 
tour as President. The present town hall of Shrewsbury occupies 
the site. He entered actively into local public affairs, and was an 
influential and important citizen. At the time of Shays's insurrec- 
tion, which had its headquarters in the town, Col. Gushing was chair- 
man of the board of selectmen. With his earliest commander, Gen. 
Artemus Ward, then Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas, 
he offered the most vigorous opposition to the movements of "the 
regulators," and thwarted their designs to his utmost. While Gen. 
Ward was dissuading the insurrection from proceeding against his 
Court and denouncing their bayonets, Col. Gushing succeeded in 
removing the town's stock of powder, which was kept at his tavern. 
Disappointed in their search for the powder, the insurgent mob sought 
for Col, Cushing, designing to wreak vengeance on him, but he had 
so covered his retreat that he was not apprehended. 
vol. xlix. 13* j 

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146 Rose (Bunster) Hills. [April, 

Later in life, when his sons were grown to manhood, Col. Gushing 
sold his property in Shrewsbury, and the family removed to Three 
Rivera in Canada, where the colonel passed the rest of his life, 
returning to Shrewsbury to die. Dr. Edward Flint, town clerk, 
selectman, surgeon in Ruggles's regiment in the Crown Point expe- 
dition, and the physician of Shrewsbury, records in his diary the 
circumstances of the event in Spartan brevity : 

April 1808 — Col. Gushing returned from Canada and attended 
lecture ; at meeting on Sunday ; at sacrcment ; at Town meeting 
on Monday; and deceased the 16th. 



ROSE (DUNSTER) HILLS. 

By William S. Hills, Esq., of Boston, Mass. 

Was Rose Hills (the wife of Joseph Hills of Maiden, Mass.) 
the sister of Henry Dunster, the first president of Harvard Col- 
lege ? 

Joseph Hills came to this country from Maldon, Essex County, 
England, in the ship " Susan and Ellen," and arrived in Charles- 
town, Mass., in 1638. He was probably accompanied by his wife, 
Rose (although no written evidence of this fact has ever been 

found), as his son, Gershom, was born in Charlestown, — 1639. 

This fact makes it fair to suppose that she came with him. 

I have been unable to find any documentary evidence throwing 
any light upon the maiden name of the said Rose Hills, excepting 
only that which is contained in the will of Henry Dunster, which is 
dated bYbniary 8, ll>f>8, ami from which 1 take the following ex- 
tracts : 

" Concerning my daughter Elizabeth my mind and will is, that 
she shall be at the disposing of her mother during her life in her 
minority, and, in case of my wive's death, then to live with my sis- 
ter Mrs. Hills, of Maiden, during her minority, and faithfully and 
carefully to serve her as if she were her own child, and in case there 
also the Lord by death should make such uncomfortable breaches 
in the family, that shee could not live comfortably there, then shee 
shall live with my sister Willard of Concord doing her faythfull 
service ;is a child until her marriage or maturity of age. * * * * * 
Item. 1 give and bequeath to the holy servant of the Lord Elder 
ffrost Twenty shillings, and to my cousin Bowers and her children 
five shillings apeece, and to my cousin fayth Dunster five shillings, 
and to my sister Willard and all her children five shillings apeece, 
"and to my sister Hills and all her children Rorn in this country five 






1895.] Rose {Dunster) Hills. 147 

shillings apeece, and my will is that my fay th full mayd Mary Russell 
should have 15 shillings added to her wages." 

It appears from the foregoing that President Dunster speaks of 
Mrs. Hills and Mrs. Willard as sisters, but whether in the sense of 
relationship or as sisters in the church is uncertain. The wjll of 
President Dunster was dated Feb. 8, 1658 ; Rose Plills, the first 
wife of Joseph Hills, died in Maiden on March 24, 1650. Conse- 
quently she was not living at the time that this will was made. 

Joseph Hills married for his second wife Hannah Mellows, at 
Maiden, June 24, 1651 ; she died in Maiden. For his third wife 
he married Helen Atkinson, in Jan. 1655-56, and his fourth wife 
was Ann Lunt, whom he married on March 8, 1664-65. 

These facts make it appear that the wife of Joseph Hills who was 
living at the time that the will of Henry Dunster was made, and to 
whom he refers as " my sister Hills of Maiden " was Helen (Atkin- 
son) Hills, his third wife. 

We will now ascertain the relationship in which sister Willard 
stood to President Dunster at the time that his will was made. She 
was the third wife of Simon Willard, who married his first wife in 
England prior to his coming to this country in 1634 ; she died leav- 
ing issue, but the date of her death is unknown. 

His second wife was Elizabeth Dunster, a sister of President 
Dunster, who died about six months alter their marriage, both of 
which dates are unknown. lie married for his third wife (date 
unknown) Mary Dunster, who is supposed to have been a cousin of 
President Dunster, although it is possible that she may have been 
his sister. « 

Mr. Willard died on April 24, 1676 (his wife surviving him). 
Thus it would appear that at the time that the will of President 
Dunster was made, the "sister Willard" referred to therein was 
probably the third wife of Simon Willard. 

Allowing that such were the facts in the case, the relationship of 
sister Hills and sister Willard to President Dunster were very much 
the same, although neither were his sisters either by birth or mar- 
riage. 

If Rose Hills was a sister of President Dunster, it is possible 
that the third wife of Joseph Hills might have been regarded as a 
sister by him on account of her having married his brother-in-law 
by a former marriage. By similar deduction sister Willard would 
have been considered as a sister, as her husband was also his brother- 
in-law by a former marriage. 

This seems a very plausible theory, but there is another view of 
the case which changes its aspect considerably. In a letter to Presi- 
dent Dunster from his father, dated at Balehoult, Lancashire County, 
England, March 20, 1640-41, he speaks of his son Richard, who was 
in New England, but makes no mention of his daughter Rose, the 
wife of Joseph Hills, who was then living in Charlestown, only a few 






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148 Trumbull Genealogy. [April, 

miles from Cambridge. It is at least reasonable to suppose that, if 
Rose Hills was his daughter, her name would have been mentioned 
in this letter, as lie mentioned his other sons and daughters then 
living in England.* 

Until a record of the marriage of Joseph and Rose Hills is found 
the question as to the identity of Rose Hills may never be settled 
satisfactorily, and this statement is .made in the hope that some one 
may have in their possession data, which, by being made public, 
will clear up this obscure point. 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO A TRUMBULL GENEALOGY. 

By J. Henry Lea, Esq., of Ccdarhurst, Fairhavcn, Mass. 

TllERE is probably no family among our early colonial and revo- 
lutionary stuck which has contributed so many distinguished men to 
their country's service in so many widely varied walks of life as the 
Trumbulls — preeminent among statesmen, warriors, divines, poets, 
painters and historians, the fame of the family must still rest, as its 
most enduring monument, on the patriot Governor of Connecticut 
whose nickname of "Brother Jonathan," affectionately given him 
by Washington, will ever stand as the prototype of American man- 
hood and patriotism. 

That so little has ever been done to substantiate the ancestry of 
so notable a family seems a grave omission on the part of our his- 
torians, and I esteem it a privilege to be able to throw some light on 
the obscurity which has thus far enveloped its origin. 

As is well known to all who have taken any interest in the sub- 
ject, (here we're two John Trumbulls (or Trumble, as the name was 
then generally written) in the Massachusetts Colony at an early day, 
and there has been no little confusion regarding them among; o-ene- 
alogists. As a matter of fact, however, there was no connection 
whatever between them, and nothing has ever been discovered that 
would indicate that they were even known to one another. They 
were : 

1. — Join) Trumble, Cooper, of Roxbury in IGoO, and among the first mem- 
bers of Mr. Eliot's Church thsre, and the following year (13 

* «<****** Your sisters remember their loves unto you both, but you must not 
expect them so long as your mother ami I do live. Your brother Thomas remembers his 
love, and hath sent you two dozen of almanacks; lout now he is a widower; for both wife 
and children arc dead since Michaelmas. I pray God lie take good ways. I do not know 
of any that you sent for that cnteinl to come as yet. Touching Richard I would adviso 
him not to come over again as yet, for whatsoever is his due shall be hit in the hands of 
his sisters, for I have taken a general acquittance of Robert, so that Richard and his sisters 
may have what we two old folk leave, and wo will make no waste." * * * * * 
Vide Life of Henry Dunster, by Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin, D.U., p. 22. 



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1895.] > Trumbull Genealogy. 149 

May 1G40) made freeman of Rowley. He brought to this country 
a wife Milan and son John.* 
II. — John Trumble, Mariner, of Cambridge in 163G, was also made a 
freeman in 1G40, and removed to Charlestown in 1G55. He had 
wife Elizabeth; perhaps married hcre.f 

There has always been a family tradition attributing the origin of 
one or both of them to Newcastle on Tyne in England, and this at 
length found confirmation in a power of attorney of Susan Blakiston 
of Newcastle on Tyne, widow, dated 27 August 1653, to Joanna Scill 
' of New England, to recover for her, inter alia, a debt dating from 
1637, of John Trumble, cooper, late of Newcastle on Tyne, and 
now of New England. J This gave us the evidence that it was the 
cooper and not the mariner who was from Newcastle, while the will 
of William Kinge of Ipswich, Co. Suffolk, ship carpenter, § to which 
Mr. H. F. Waters kindly called my attention, must beyond doubt 
refer to the second John, the mariner, as we now know the wife of 
the former to have been a Chandler. 

It has been my great good fortune to locate one of these with* 
absolute certainty, and the other beyond a reasonable doubt, although 
some further evidence is needed as to the last. 

Being recently in the North of England I made a careful examina- 
tion of the Consistory Court of Durham, the results of which are 
printed herewith, but they are most disappointing, as the Trumbull 
wills were few and these few yielded but little information. This 
task completed I had but one day to spare, having to keep an ap- 
pointment at the Probate Court at Lichfield, and I resolved to devote 
it to a Parish Register search of Newcastle. This important and 
populous city contains no less than four Parish Churches, and it was 
manifestly impossible to see them all in a day. Reasoning from 
analogy that if our man was a cooper he would probably have re- 
sided near the wharves and shipping, I selected the church nearest 
the river (AH Saints) to begin with, and my delight may be im- 
agined when I found, in rapid succession, the marriage of John 
Trumble and Ellinor Chandler in 1635, the baptism of his daugh- 
ter Beriah in 1637, and his son John in 1631). The burial of Beriah, 
four months after her baptism, leaving the family as we first find it 
in America, makes the identification complete, and fixes the date of 
the emigration within a few months. 

The remainder of the day was spent in exhausting the Register, 
as far as time permitted, of all entries of the name, but in spite of the 
large number of these found, the result, as far as this particular 
family is concerned, is somewhat meagre. The records only com- 
mence in 1600, and the only baptism which could, chronologically, 

* Savti«?b, iv., 336; Essex Ins. Hist. Coll., xxiv., 55. 

f Snvagft, op. cit. ; Wyman's Genealogies and Estates of Charlestown, II., 054; Paige's 
Hist. Canil)., p. 072. 
J Middlesex Co. Deeds, I, 87, printed in Register, Jan. 1884, vol. xxxviii., page 79. 
$ See abstract from Arch. Sun", file 2, No. 124. 






' 



























150 Trumbull Genealogy. [April, 

have been that of our man, is John the son of James in 1612, and I 
have serious doubts as to their identity for this reason — John Trum- 
ble of Kovvley was evidently a man of more than ordinary educa- 
tion and intelligence, he wrote a clerkly hand (no common accom- 
plishment in those days), was Town Clerk of Rowley until his death 
in 16*56, and taught the first school there;* but James, the father 
of the John baptized in 1612, is recorded as a "Kielman," that is, he 
•occupied the humble position of a laborer on one of the keelboats or 
lighters used in loading vessels or conveying freight about the 
wharves, and it does not seem likely that a man in his position could 
have given his son the edueation which we know the emigrant to 
have possessed. 

The other three ancient parishes of Newcastle may, however, give 
us the parentage of John Trumble which All Saints denies us. 
They are St. Andrew's (Keg. 1597), St. John's (1587) and St. 
Nicholas (1558), the latter being the mother church. Gateshead 
in Durham, on the opposite bank of the Tyne and integrally a part 
of Newcastle, the Register of which dates from 1559, should also be 
examined. The parentage of Ellinor Chandler, which was not found 
at All Saints, should also be sought in all of these. 

It may be, however, that we must«look further afield and across the 
Scottish border. It has always been believed that the Trumbulls 
of England were descended from the broken remnants of the once 
powerful border ojiin of Turnbull, whose romantic origin is so well 
iinown,f and which, harried in turn by Scotch and English forays, 

* Essex Ins. Hist. Colls., iv., 55-6. 

f 4l Between red czlarlmnks, that frightful scowl, 

Fringed with grey hazel, ronrs the mining Ronll; 

Whore Tunitmlls once, p race no power could awe, 

Lined the rough skirts of stormy Rubiesluw. 

Bold was the chief from whom their line they drew, 

Whose nervous arm the furious bison slew, 

The bison, fiercest raeo C'f Scotia's breed, 

Whoso hounding course outstripped (lie red deer's speed, 

By hunters eluded, encircled on tho plain, 

He frowning shook his yellow lion maine, 

Spurned with black hoof in bursting rage the ground, 

And fiercely toss'd his moony horns around. 

On Scotia's lord he rush'd with lightning speed, 

Bent his strong neck to toss the startled steed ; 

His arms robust the hardy hunter dung 

Around his bending horns, and upward wrung, 

With writhing force his neck retorted round, 

And roll'd the panting monster on the ground, 

Crush'd with enormous strength his bony skull; 

And courtiers hailed the man who turned the bull." 

Lcydens' Scenes of Infancy, p. 102. 

The adventure took place in tho forest of Callender, near Stirling, and its date is ap- 
proximately fixed by a grant from King Robert Bruce in 1315 of lands in Fulhophalch (i.e. 
PhiliphaughiU short distance west of the Rule), to Willielmo dicto TurnebitU, for "a reddendo 
of one {/road arrow at the, feast of the Assumption of the Virgin' Mary." (lU'i;. Mag. Sig., 
p. (J), lie was slain at the battle of Ualldon Hill in' 1333 in a single combat with Sir Robert 
Bchhalc, a Norfolk knight. (Hutchinson's Northumb.. ii., 70; Ridpath's Border Hist., 
213.) 

Walter Turnbull, probably son of tho above, was early in the possession of Mynto, so 
long held by the family, and which was confirmed to him, or a descendant of tho same 
name, by King David III. in 1370. (Robertson's Index, p. 33, No. 18). Before the middle 









. 



■ 












im 1895.] , Trumbull Genealogy. 151 

was finally broken up and scattered. In 1545 the English burned 
no less than twelve castles and two towns of the elan in the Valley 
of the liule,* and although the Barony of'Mynto remained vested in a 
chief of the name until the middle of the 17th century, f the power 
of the clan was broken, and it was thenceforward but a shadow of 
its former self. 

jp, The alien tax in the Lay Subsidies at the Public Record Office in 

Fetter Lane, the results of a brief examination of which are printed 

i herewith, seems to clearly indicate the Scotch origin of the Trum- 

bull s, and so to point to the Clan Turnbull of Bedrule as the pro- 
genitors of the race. 

We will now turn to John Trumble the mariner. Being engaged 
one day in a search of the Baptismal Registers of St. Dunstan's, 
Stepney, London, my attention was attracted by the occurrence of 
a family of the name, and I believe that John the son of Robert 
Trumble, mariner, of Wapping, who was baptized 25 Sept. 1G08, 
will prove to be the John Trumble of Charlcstown, who in 1665 
was 48| and in 1686 was 80, § according to his own depositions. 
These Inst dates are utterly irreconcilable, and we can only conjec- 
ture that the first of them should be 1655, or that his age should 
have been 58 instead of 48, to make iliem harmonize with each other. 
Admitting this error, they are, taken in connection with the mari- 
time profession of the father, most suggestively near to the date of 
baptism as given ; while the statement of Savage, that he was in 

I his 80th year at his death in July 1687, exactly tallies with the 

baptism. || >{ 

Robert, the father, unfortunately died intestate in 1614,^[ but the 
will of the mother, Judith, may yei be found, or some further and 
more exact reference from some of the King, ITichman or Sandwell 
families.** The wills at Bury St. Edmunds should also be seen in 
this connection, while a further examination of the Stepney Regis- 
ters for Marriages and Burials might, and most probably would, 
demonstrate or disprove (lie theory I have promulgated. 

There was a family of Trumbulls of London, fishmongers and 
shipowners, if not mariners, in the 16th century, whose wills in the 

■ 

of the 15th century they had obtained the Barony of Bedrule (Stoddard's Scottish Arms, 
ii., 49), having by this time become a powerful border clan and rivalling the Moss Troopers 
of Liddesdale in audacity and daring. In 1.310 their excesses had become so great that the 
King of Scotland marched with an army to the waters of Rule and executed summary 
justice on the clan. (Jeffrey's Hist. Roxborough, 330.) This blow and a deadly vendetta 
with the Iters, aided the border warfare, in weakening and finally breaking up the c!an. 
The last who clamed the chieftainship, after the failure of the, direct lino of Myntoand Bed- 
rule, was a John Turnbull of Know, about IG72-78. (Stoddard, ii., 50.) 

* Jeffercy's Hist. Roxborough, 331. 

f Ibid — Retour, ii., No. 243. 

+ Wyman's Gen. and Est. of Charlestown, ii., 954. 

$ Paige's Hist. Camb., p. 072. 

|| Siiviigo, iv., 330. 

11 See his admon. in Coin. Cl, of Lond. 1014. 

** Sec will of William Kinge, above cited. 



152 Trumbull Genealogy. [April, 

Pre. Court make a very good pedigree of four generations,* and 
whom 1 have suspected to be the prepositors of Robert of Stepney, 
but no conlimatory evidenee has yet been found, and I believe that 
their place of origin will be finally located in Suffolk or Essex, pro- 
bably derived, like the Newcastle family, from the Clan Turnbull, 
Jn the meanwhile I submit the results of my stray gleanings during 
the last half dozen years in the English fields in the hope that other 
than the two grains of wheat which I have pointed out may be 
found among the chaff, and may prove of service to some co-worker 
in the cause. 

Aliens Taxed in Northumberland. 

1544 — Return of Strangers inhabiting within ihe Towne of Newcastle upon 
Tine, co. Northumb., dated laste October xxxvj Henry 8th. 
Ralph the Earl of Westmoreland, Tliomas Tempest knyght. 
Thomas Hylton knyght, Robert lewyn mair of Towne of New- 
castle opon tyne, Robert Brandelyng, Henry Anderson & Jacobus 
lawson m r chants of said towne, constitute Thomas mydelton gent., 
Ilyghe Collector &c of Subsidies granted xxxv H. 8 on Aliens, 
(The report contains no Trumbulh.) P.R.O. 158-70 

1545 — Ditto, dated vj Januarie xxxvj Hen. viij. The Mayor & 2 Alder- 
men say they can in nowise be informed of any such person or 
persons borne out of the kinges dominions. P.R.O. 158-70 

1548— -Ditto, dated xxij Jan. 1 Edw. vi. (Nat Trumbulh.) P.R.O. 158-73 

1550— Ditto, dated xxix Aprill, 3 Edw. vi. {No Trumbulh.) P.R.O. 158-76 

1550— Ditto, dated xv ffeb. 4 Edw. vi. {No Trumbulh.) P.R.O. 158-77 

1551 — Ditto, dated xx march, 5 Edw. vi. 

Itm: Robert Trimbyll having goodes to the value of v 8 and not 
aboue viij''. P.R.O. 158-78 

1559— Ditto, dated 10 Sept., 1 Elizabeth. 

Widowe Troomble a scot p ,h by the pole iiij d P.R.O. 158-79 

1559 — Ditto, dated xxvij Nov., 2 Elizabeth. 

wedow trimble a scote paith by the powle iiij d P.R.O. 158-80 

1572 — Ditto, dated xvij June, 14 Elizabeth. {No Trumbutts.) 

P.R.O. 158-81 

1577— Ditto, dated x Oct., 19 Eliz. {No Trumbulh.) P.R.O. 158-82 

1581 — Ditto, dated xxviij Maye, 23 Elizabeth. 

Robert Tromble a Scott paieth by the Poll iiij d . P.R.O. 158-83 

1597— Ditto, dat. 6 Oct., 39 Eliz. {No trumbulh.) P.R.O. 158-87 

1621— Ditto, dated 5 April, 19 James, 1621. 

Newcastle on Tyne — Alienizine Nate. 

Georgius Trumble taxatur ad nihil viij d . 
Alexander " " " " 

Johes " Ci " " 



Jacobus 

Dauid 

Isabella 



P.R.O. 158-89 



[To bo continued.] 

* Wills of Thomas Trumbull the elder 1/567, Johano his wife 1570, Tliomns Trumbull 
the younger 1509, Kmauuel Trumbull 1003. Admons. of Edward Trumbull 1010, and 
Maria Trumbull 1619. See also Marriage Licenses 1579, 1587 and 1014. 












■ 






, 












1895.] Some Dorchester Matters. 153 






SOME DORCHESTER MATTERS. 

Contributed by Robert Tiiaxtek Swan, Esq., Commissioner of Public Records for 

MassaehufeCtts. 

A volume recently shown me as a curiosity was found to contain 
mucli matter which seemed Worthy of extraction and arrangement 
for perpetuation. 

The book was, .apparently, first the property of Zcrijah Wales of 

Dorchester, Mass., son of Samuel AVales aSa . He was 

born in Dorchester, Feb. 2G, 1678, and married Sarah Pay son 
(called Parson in the printed records of Dorchester), daughter of 
Ephraim Pay son of Dorchester. Jt was used as an account book 
by him from about 1718 to 1738, and after his death, Feb. 20, 
1745, by his son Joseph AVales, born Aug. 29, 1717, from 1752 to 
1759. Joseph died April 28, 1762, no marriage being recorded. 

The book was then reversed for use and an entry appears, "This 
book belongs to me, Theodore Beezer [ ?] Theodore." From Feb. 
9, 1707 to Aug. 22, 1774, it contains the record of "a Court Held 
before AVm. Holden Esq 1 ' One of his Majestys Justices of ye peace 
for The County of Suffolk," evidently written by the said Theodore, 
who wrote everything plainly but his own name. William llolden 
died March 30, 177G, and his son Dr. Phinehas Holden of Dor- 
chester, born Jan. 31, 1743, used it from 1798 to about 1811 for 
charging his professional visits, and there are a few items bearing 
dates from 1793. It also contains entries of matters many of which 
would naturally come within his knowledge. From the latter part 
of 1806 the charges and entries are in another hand, and an exami- 
nation of signatures on papers hereinafter referred to, which are 
on file in the registry of probate at Dcdham, confirm the belief that 
they were probably made by Stephen Holden who was a witness to 
"Ant AVales" will, and appears in the printed record as the father 
of Stephen, born May 6, 1803. Some of the entries will be better 
understood if it is stated that Or. Holden married Thankful Baker, 
daughter of John Baker, Jr., and Sarah Wiswcll, whose sister 
Elizabeth married Nathaniel AVales. 

Among the charges made by Dr. Holden are found many for 
"laying bis wife" or "putting his wife to bed," with an occasional 
addition of "boy" or "girl." A comparison of the births thus re- 
corded with the printed records of Dorchester shows some confirma- 
tions of the print, supplies tin; month or day of the month in many 
instances, and in many contradicts the print in some particulars. 
The I >orehester dates in many cases are undoubtedly baptisms and not 
births. The reliability of a record made by an attending physician 
vol. xi.ix. 11 



154 Some Dorchester Matters. [April, 

would seem to be as worthy of credence as the record made by the 
clerk at a time when returns to the clerks were carelessly made, if 
made at all, and where the lack of chronological order shows want 
of system, and where births and baptisms are confused. For this 
reason I have thought it well to perpetuate it. 

In the following entries those in italics agree with the record as 
printed in the twenty-first report of the Boston Record Commis- 
sioners ; those not agreeing are followed in parentheses by the entry 
as printed ; while those in Roman are not found at all in the printed 
record. 

Marriages Solemnized by William Holden Esquire. 

December 27, 17G8 Married Jacob ITumfrey of Dorchester to Releaf 
Blake of s a Dorchester: They being Legally published by the Town Clerk 
of s d as appeared by his certificate: attest Win Ilolden ejus Peace. 

Dorchester August 21 : 1771 : Suffolk ss. On the aforesaid day Ebenezer 
Sever Jun r and Tabitha Davenport, Boath of Roxbery were Joined in 
Wedlock, by me the Subscriber. W m Ilolden Jus Peace 

Marriages recorded in the record of Dr. Piiineiias Holden. 

1793 Ebenezer Lealaud married at Roxbury September 1 to the ami- 
able Miss Sukey Wilson 

179 G Patty Holden* married May 1 /to Mr. Samuel Glover Junr. 
June 1st.) 

Lydia Clap married June 20 (to James Pierce of Roxbury.) 

Hopestill Hall married May 8 

1797 Samuell topleff Married February 6 

1798 Joshua grant of Watertown married January 31 

In the year 1799 Maragcs 

Z/iub (Zerubbabel ) Horsey Maried March 12 to Betsey glover 

Sam Payson Married April 11 the psalm sung 128 

Samuell Payson Jlfarried April 11 to his wife Sister (Junior to Miss 
Lydia Trcseott both of Dorchester.) 

Pster J/oslcy Married April lJf (to James Christie of Norfolk in Virginia.) 

Lois Holden Married May 5 (to Benjamin White of Boston.) 

William Pope & Sarah Pierce married June 1G 

Sarah Clap Married to Thomas Lyon Sept. 22 (Sarah Junr.) 

Jonathan Hall Married to Ruth Williams Nov. 13 

Ward Married to Joanna Bird Novemb 20 (Samuel of Roxbury.) 

Stephen Holden Married to Susanna tolman Dec. 26. (Susanna Lewis 
Tolman.) 

1800 Mary Thair & Thomas Whelar married April 1 

Jo Arnold Married to FAizabeth Holden Oct 5 (Joseph to Betsey Holden, 
Oct. G.) 

Junnas Munrow Married Mary Vose Oct 5 (Thomas Junior to Polly 
Vose Oct. 1 2.) 

Samuel Clap Married to Ann Capen of S to ten Nov 27 

Nathaniel (Hap Married Oct! Mary Williams (Polly Williams Oct. 8th.) 

Eclwiird Leeds Married to Downs Dec 27 

* Dr. Holden's daughter. ' 












: 






1895.] Some Dorchester Matters. 155 

1801 Oliver Glover Married to Lydia Luis Sept 

Joseph Luis Married to Abigail Glover Sept 

David Clap Married Zuba Capen July 1801 

Ebenezer Davenport Married Nov 1 (to Sarah Cutting Oct 25th.) 

Mr Leach fy Fanny Vase Married Dec 8 (Lewis Leach, Dec 7th.) 

1801 At Milton Major Joseph Babcock to Mrs Grace Draper of Rox- 
bury. 

1802 Fercnton fy Mary Bulman- Married Feb J+ (John Farring- 

ton.) 

Scherod Mivnrow to Weeb Married April 7 (Benjamin S Munro 

to Catherine Webb.) 

1802 Samuel Howe fy Elizabeth Davenport Married October 2 4 (Sam- 
uel Junior.) 

1803 Edward Pierce $> Clap Married Feb 3 (Capt. Edward 

to Elizabeth January 27.) 

Doct Abraham Moore of Bolton Married Betsey Wales of Boston 1803 

ware Married January 24* 

1803 Married Benjamin Green March 8 Day Tie & his Lady Rode to 
church in a Coeh til air was mats Laid from the coach into the Church then 
flanel for them to walk on 

1803 Mr baldwin Married Timothy Crosby to Miss Ruth Pope June 
16 Daughter to Doct John Pope 

1803 John Clap Married to Precilla Holden November 17 
Daniel Pierce Married to Lydia Davenport May 10 

1804 John Baker the first Married Mrs Colson July S (Mrs Christian 
Colson late of Boston.) 

1804 Israel Badlam Daughter Married April 26. (Mr Edward Sharp 
of Boston to Miss Polly Badlam.) 

September 6 Mr. Josiah Gushing of Boston $,* I^ucy Holden 

Mr Jacob Rogers & Julia Shelleback married Sept 29 

Jonathan Pierce and Eunice Tolman married Dec 6 (Jonathan Junior.) 

1805 Ben Lyon Married to Eliza babcock January 13 (Benjamin Junr 
to Eliza Babcock of Milton.) 

Betsey Spear married to her second husband January 30 

Sam Stone Married Hannah Davenport February 17 

Aaron Spear married to Hannah Rich April 18 

Sewall White Married to Betsey Holden May 12 1805 

1805 or 181 0| John White Married October 6 

180G old thomas Munrows Daughter LJdia Married April 10 (Mr. 
William Johns to Miss Lydia Munrow.) 

Phineas Withington § Polly Mosley Married October 12 

James Everett § Itannah Vincen Married October IS 

1807 Cap Samuel I^yon Married Hannah Mallish March 15 in the 
Morning (Mr Samuel B. Lyon.) 

Mr George Burrough & Charlotte Schellebeck Married April 8 

1807 In Northampton Isaac C. Bates Esq to Miss Martha llenshaw & 
Ebenezer Hunt Junr Esq to Miss Sarah Swift llenshaw Daughters of the 
Hon Samuel Henshaw| 

Aimer Gardner $ Mary Noyles Married Nov 1808 (Mary Niles Oct. 18, 
1807.) 

* Not recorded in Bolton. 

t Date uncertain. 

t Recorded in Northampton. 















. 















V5G Some Dorchester Matters. [April, 

At Providence R. I. April 10 Capt Grace of New Orleans To Mrs. 
Lucy Taiks wile of Benjamin Parks printer. 

Sewall White Married to Ruth Wetherbee April 17 

L809 Saniuel Bridge Married to Sarah Payson Dec. 21 (Sarah Leeds 
Pflysoni) 

1810 Dr Henry Gardner Married March 29 to Clarissa Holbrook of 
Milton. ( . 

thair marriages 

1810 llenery Robinson & Susannah Gold Dec 4 
Isaac Howe to Abigail Kelton Dec 9 

Samuel Clap to Hannafi Pierce Dej 12 

1812 Samuel Payson Marryed to Lucy Holden. 

1812 Samuel Payson Marryed to Lucy Holden January 23 

Births recorded by Dr. Phinehas Holden as memoranda. 

1801 Joseph Bradfofds child Born Feb 1 

1801 Joseph Bradfords Boy Born 

1801 Boy Born about the first of Feb 

Luse Fields Birthday June 29 1801 aged 11 

Asel Allen Dec 13 was 25 years old 

Hannah Edda was 19 years old March 12 1802 

1S0C March 2G George Burrows 24 years old & Meriah Burrows was 
in March 28 180G 

Abraham Grant 21 years old January 22 1810 

llenery Robensons wife April 23 Boy born Name James abraham golds 
Daughter 1811 (.Tames Henry son of Henry.) 

*Our Ministers Children Born Thad Masson harris children 

the first A Boy Bom November 12 1705 thad William (Thaddeus 
William.) 

the second A girl Born January 30 1797 Dorathay 

the third A Boy Born July 13, 179S Clarendon ( Elijah Dix.) 

the forth A Boy Born September 9 Name AVinthrop 

180 1 the fifth a Boy Born August 16 John Dunkins (John Alexander 
August 17, 180 1.) 

lNOt, the Sixth Child Born March 19 Boy 

1806 the Boys Name James Bruce (James "VYinthrop born March 21st 
1806.) 

1811 the 7 Child Born May — Sarah Dunkins (Sarah Duncan, June 
2d 1811 born April 15, 1811.) 

1813 Mr Harris Daughter Born July — Crisoned 
August 1 Name f (Rebekah August 1st 1813.) 

Deaths recorded by Dr. Phinehas Holden as memoranda. 

1798 My Father Baker died November 11 aged 83 years & 4 months 
& 11 days (John Baker died November — 1798 in his 84th year.) 

1799 Salome Pope died March She ma ***<! first Joseph Biford then a 
Man by the Name of Jeffers Jeffers died November — 1806 

1799 Ebenezer Mosleys wife died June 25 (Abigail.) 

* These entries are so indefinite, and differ so materially from the printed record, that 

they are reproduced as nearly as possible, 
f Written and intentionally blotted out. 



1895.] Some Dorchester Matters. 157 

1800 Abigail Phillips died February J h 1800 and hurried February 6 
She Died at William Munrows Junr & Buryed from thair (Mrs Phillips a 
resident in this town.) 

1800 Nov. 3 Ezekiel Birds wife (Hannah.) 

1801 We heard of Justinians death Oct 27 Justinian died the 15 (1801 
Justinian Holden Died at Norfolk in Virginia.) 

1801 Doct Rails Son killed in a Duel June Hon Dorchester Neck and 
ho heard of another Sons Death in half anour after in the Westinges 

1802 Josfaft Bakers wife died March 

1802 Iehabod Wis wall died May 15 (May 17.) 

At Bolton Doct Abraham Moore Died March 7 Aged 55 years he died 
in the year 1804 

1804 Elizabeth Kelton Ebenezer Keltons widow died Sept 15 (Sept 23.) 

1805 Mrs Gram lives at South Boston Sept 5 She died 
180G Solomon Hall died August 4 & Buryed 5 aged 39 

1807 Elijah Jones died Feb 19 buried 21 aged 59 

1808 to one visit to Mr John Green January G 

John Green is Dead 
April 24 1810 John Read the 3 poisened himself. Buryed 25 
1813 Joshua Glover died in the army* 

Births recorded by Dr. Phineiias Holden in nis family charges 

UNDER THE PHRASE "FOR LAYING HIS WIFE" OR 

" PUTTING HIS WIFE TO BED." 

m 

1IIE NAMES ARE OFJTIIE FATHERS OF THE FAMILIES. 

1798 John Green Nov 2 

1798 Samuel Barrett Nov 27 (Ebenezer.) 

1798 Thomas Leeds Dec. 21 

1800 " " Dec 7 or 8 I don't know which 

1802 " " AuglG 

1799 Mr Mereau,f January 11 
1799 Phineas Spear Sept 15 
1799 Benjamin Thair Oct 5 
1802 «• « Aug 3 

1804 " " Nov 4 boy 
1807 " " February girl 

1799 Jonathan Bird Junr Nov 18 (Joel Nov — 1799.) 

1800 Samuel Baker Junr Aug 11 (Joah was born 1800.) 

1800 John Moise Oct 13 (Mary Moise 1800.) 

1802 « « Aug 27 

1803 « « Sept 18 (Ebenezer Robinson, Sept, — 1803.) 

1805 " " Aug. 24 (August — 1805.) 

1800 Benjamin Burrell Dec 2 

1801 William Pope April 18 boy (Charles.) 
1805 « « ^/tf (Rachael.) 

1801 Benjamin Whito Dec 19 
1805 « " Jan 19 

1802 Mr. Newell Feb 26 

* In April 1813 there is a charge to his widow. 

f The name is doubtful, as is another in tho margin which looks like Mereone. It mny 
have boon Marion, as that name occurs in the rocords. 
VOL. XI. IX. 14* 



. 



. 


















158 8ome Dorchester Matters. [April, 

1802 Edward Glover Junr* (Charles was born 1802.) 

1802 Mr Stuard May 1 (James tlio son of Jonathan & Abigail Steward 

born .January.) 

1805 " « Jan 14 (Mary Ann Sewardf born Jany. 1805.) 

1802 Thomas Munro, tailor Dec 3 (William Vose of Thomas Junr 

was born 1802.) 

1802 Thomas Mosley Dec 4 (Elisha.) 

1802 Mr Gooden torn Wellingtons son-in-law Dec 14. 

1802 , Calvin Bird Dec. 27 (Emila Johnson, January — 1803.) 
1805 " i July 22 ( Roanna born 1805.) 

1803 Mr Fisher Jan' 26 (Charles Grandison of Lewis and Mary Feb 

— 1803.) 

1804 " " Sept 3 (Mary, Oct. — 1804.) 

1808 " «« Dec 10 
1803 James Leeds Jan 29 

1803 Barney Hollis Feb. 14 (Elizabeth Jenkins, baptized 1804, born 

•) 

1804 " " July 22 (Harriet baptized 1804; born 

Augt. — 1804.) 

1805 Barney Hollis Aug 17 (John Watson Aug 1805.) 

1806 " " Aug 16 

1807 " " child Chrisoned Joseph Finne November 1 (Joseph 
Faney born Nov. — 1807.) 

1803 Joseph Arnold Aug 27 (Mary Augt. —1803.) 

1805 " " June 21 girl waid 10 pounds (James, born June — 
1805.) 

1807 " " June 11 

1801) « « March 26 Boy (Joseph July 9, 1809.) 

1803 Elisha Turner Sept. 2 girl (Lucy Aug. — 1803.) 

1805 " " November girl (Ann November — 1805.) 

1803 Aaron. Spear September 9 (Sarah Sept. the — 1803.) 

1803 Mr. More Nov 10 

1803 Lemuel Spear Nov 19 girl (Rebecca Mann, February the — 
1801.) 

1805 « « June 19 girl (Mary August — 1805.) 

1801 Samuel White March (John Bulmar, March —1804.) 

1805 " " June 2 Boy (Samuel June — 1805.) 

1806 " " July 17 girl (Lydia Elizabeth, Augt. -— 1806.) 

1804 Benjamin Bird April 6' (Benjamin April — 1804.) 

1804 Alexander Glover September 28 (John.) 

1805 William Vose January 18 boy (Oliver 1805.) 

1807 " " March 16 girl (Pemelia, son (sic) of, April — .) 
1805 Abraham Gold March 10 (Elizabeth Foster, March — 1805.) 
1805 Jotham Stone March 24 Boy 

1805 Oliver Glover July 5 (Thomas Oliver.) 

1805 Edmund Smith July 16 girl (Esther Christie of Edmund M. July 

— 1805.) 

1807 " " Feb. 15 boy (Edmund of Edmund M. April — 

1807.) 

1809 " « Sept 9 (Joseph of Edmund M. Oct. 1, 1809.) 
1805 Ebenezer Clap July 23, girl (Lucy July — 1805.) 

* Date not given, but after May 2. 

f The only .Seward in the printed records. 



: 



1895.] Some Dorchester Matters. 159 

1805* John Malesh Aug 24 (Lucretia, Oct. 19, 1804.) 

1805 Suewl White Sept. 18 

1806 Samuel Sims Oct 28 

1807 Ephraim Herenton July 5 
1807 Joseph Marshall Nov. 28 

1810 Joseph Howe April 4 Girl (Esther Baxter Son (sic) Sept. 2, 
1810.) 

Miscellaneous entries made by Doct Piiineiias Holden or others. 

1799 January 8 My Fathersf Things Wear Sold at Public Vandue 

January 8 Pason Eaton Vandue Master. 

1799 Mr Ganings (?) child Christened March 7 the Childs Name Was 
Margrett ganing ( ? ) 

1799 A fier in Boston opeset the White Horse May 11 

1799 the Society of Ministers Preached hear October the first Day 

1800 Our Cheritrees wear Blone out April 20 and it snowed April the 
23 

1800 the Brigade turned out at Dorchester Sept 25 

1801 the Brigade turned out Sept 17 at Bran try 
1801 Great Grate training at Bran try Sept 17 

Mr Everett went and took down the mill house Aug 12 1801 

1801 the first snow Dec 28 

1802 Ant Wales things Aprised January 21 the Aprisers Payson Eton 
& Elisha turner & Benjamin Jacobs 

1802 Sarah Hall & Thankful Holden & Ann Withington divided Ants 
Wales things June 23 and the Doct took the will & Enventory & put them 
in his deskt 

1802 paid for the plate of Ants Coffin June 30 paid 3 dolars 3 quarters 

1802 Sept 18 Ebenezer Wellingtons Shop Burnt the first time they 
tryed the new Engine 

1802 the Brigade turned out at Jamaica Plane Sept 

1802 of 20 Spinning Blankets 4 Scanes to the pound it takes 12 notts 
to warp one yard Five quarters wide so Tom Jones Tolman Saith Ebenezer 
Tolman Wove the Blankets the Warp 63 Scanes & Fillen 72 & half 

1802 Thankful Keltons granddaughters name at Philadelphia Eunice 
Truston 

1804 The Doctor went to Dedham to prove old Mary Birds will Feb- 
ruary 3§ 

Unite Blackman buryed December 28 1805 under Arms 

the text the Sabbath after Moses Evrit ordained Romans 15 chap & 30 
& 31 Verces 

Capt Lorin left Dorchester October 14 1802 



A charge to William Pope in 1805 reads "to one visit to A. Coster got 
hurt" which is probably intended for a visit to a sailor on a "coaster" 
bringing lumber to William Pope's lumber yard. 

In a few instances tho amount charged by Dr. Holden is given and aver- 
ages about fifty cents a visit. 

• Possibly 1804. ,j 

f " Father Baker." 

t Tho inventory und will arc on filo at Dedham. 

f Tho will is on lilo. 



• 






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160 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



BRITISH OFFICERS SERVING IN AMERICA, 1754-1774. 



Contributed by Wokthington Chauncey Fohb, Esq., of Washington, D. C. 



Date of Commission. 





[Continued from 


page 58.] 


Name. 


Rank. 


Regiment 


Reid, Mathevv 


Ensign 


40 


Reid, Mathew 


Ensign 


42 


Reilly, Luke 


Ensign 


44 


Reynolds, Lawrence 


Captain 


9 


Rhaii 


Lieut. 
Lieut. 


60 
60 


Rhan, John Rodolph 


Rhor, Charles 


Ensign 


60 


Ricard, Francis 


Lieut. 


29 


Ricard, Thomas 


Ensign 


60 


Richards, Ch. Lloyd 


Captain 


95 


Richardson, Duncan 


Ensign 


44 




Lieut. 


42 


Richardson, William 


Ensign 


26 




Lieut. 


26 


Richardson, William 


Ensign 


id 




Lieut. 


18 


Richmond, Ezra 


Captain 


N. Y. 


Rickman, William 


Captain 


95 


Ridge, William 


Ensign 


62 




Lieut. 


60 




Captain 


60 


Riesberg, Ulrick W. 


Ensign 


60 


Rigge, George 


Lieut. 


42 


Riggj Patrick 


Captain 


26 


Riggi Thomas 


Captain 


26 


Ritchie, ,Iohn 


l 8t Lieut. 


21 


Rivez, Charles 


Ensign 


60 




Lieut. 


60 


Roberts, Benjamin 


Ensign 


46 




Lieut. 


46 


Roberts, Cha : West 


Lt. Col. 


65 


Roberts, John 


Adj 1 . 


29 


Roberts, John 


Lieut. 


65 




Capt. Lt. 


65 




Adf. 


G5 


Roberts, Robert 


Surgeon 


15 


Roberts, William 


Capt. Lt. 


65 


Robertson, Archibald 


Lieut. 


77 


Robertson, Charles 


Lieut. 


77 


Robertson, Daniel 


Ensign 


42 




Lieut. 


42 


Robertson, James 


Captain 


1 


Robertson, James 


Captain 


77 



28 February, 1761. 

1 August, 1759. 

10 December, 1761. 
12 January, 1758. 

10 January, 1755. 
8 March, 1757. 

24 July, 1757. 

21 March, 1765. 
16 June, 1760. 

22 February, 1760. 

25 July, 1758. 

29 November, 1760. 
31 October, 1770. 

11 September, 1766. 
16 February, 1770. 
4 October, 1755. 

23 February, 1760. 

3 January, 1756. 

10 December, 1756. 
18 September, 1760. 
27 July, 1758. 

2 April, 1764. 

29 November, 1760. 

7 February, 1759. 
10 April, 1765. 

25 July, 1758. 

4 October, 1760. 

23 July, 1758. 

12 September, 1762. 
16 May, 1766. 

13 February, 1762. 

24 August, 1764. 

3 May, 1766. 

18 April, 1766. 

20 November, 1758. 
16 May, 1766. 

8 January, 1757. 

15 September, 1758. 

26 July, 1759. 
29 April, 1762. 

4 September, 1754. 

19 July, 1757. 






i 













































. 


















































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. 














• 












































































































































































1895.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



161 



Robertson, James 



Robertson, James 

Robertson, John 
Robertson, .John 
Robertson, Robert 
Robertson, Robert 
Robertson, William 

Robinson, Andrew 

Robinson, Arthur 
Robinson, Henry 
Robinson, Thomas 
Robinson, William 
Robson, Ralph 
Rochat, J no. Peter 
Roehe, Boyle 

Roe, Godfrey 
Roe, Henry 
Rogers, George 

Rogers, John 
Rogers, Jonathan 

Rogers, Jonathan 

Rogers, Robert 
Rojlaz, 



Rollo, Andrew, Lord 
Rollo, Hon. John 



Romer, John William 
Roseoe, John 
Roserow, John 
Rose, Alexander 

Rose, Arthur 
Rose, Hugh 

Rose, Hugh 

Roseboom, John Mind 
Rosenhagen, Philip 
Ross, Alexander 
Ross, Alexander 
Ross, Andrew 
Ross, Andrew 
Ross, John 



Major 


62 


Lieut. Col. 


15 


Lieut. Col. 


16 


Ensign 


42 


Ensign 


43 


Surgeon 


29 


Lieut. 


42 


1 st Lieut. 


40 


Lieut. 


42 


Ensign 


78 


Lieut. 


78 


Colonel 


45 


Maj. Gen. 




2 d Lieut. 


21 


Ensign 


17 


Lieut. 


29 


Ensign 


34 


1 st Lieut. 


94 


Q'. W, 


60 


Lieut. 


27 


Capt. Lt. 


27 


Ensign 


48 


Ensign 


48 


Ensign 


46 


Lieut. 


46 ' 


Chaplain 


29 


Surgeon 


17 


Lieut. 


17 


Capt. Lt. 


17 


Captain 


So. Ca. 


Captain 


62 


Lt. Col. 


22 


Lieut. 


22 


Q r . M*. 


22 


Captain 


77 


Ensign 


31 


Ensign 


80 


Lieut. 


26 


Lieut. 


52 


Capt. Lt. 


52 


Lieut. 


78 


Ensign 


55 


Lieut. 


55 


Lieut. 


N.Y. 


Adj'. 


N.Y. 


Lieut. 


N.Y, 


Chaplain . 


8 


Lieut. 


45 


Lieut. 


14 


Ensign 


60 


Ensign 


31 


2 d Lieut. 


40 


Lieut. 


40 



26 December, 1755. 

25 February, 1760. 
17 August, 1768. 

28 February, 1761. 

16 October, 1761. 
10 December, 1755. 

21 July, 1758. 

22 November, 1755. 

26 July, 1758. 

17 October, 1759. 

5 October, 1760. 

24 September, 1761. 

25 June, 1759. 

15 January, 1762. 
2 February, 1757. 
25 December, 1770. 

29 March, 1762. 
7 March, 1760. 

1 May, 1760. 

10 December, 1755. 

25 August, 1762. 

6 June, 1757. 

19 August, 1759. 

21 September, 1756. 

22 July, 1758. 

1 February, 1762. 

22 January, 1755. 
21 September, 1756. 

29 April, 1762. 
25 October, 1760. 
12 January, 1756. 

25 October, 1756. 
9 April, 1756. 

26 October, 1756. 
17 September, 1760. 

12 July, 1770. 
21 July, 1762. 

24 August, 1758. 

7 May, 1757. 

25 February, 1767 

17 July, 1757. 

26 December, 1755. 
26 July, 1758. 

15 January, 1760. 
15 January, 1760. 

30 November, 1745. 

18 November, 1767. 
4 July, 1764. 

18 September, 1765. 

23 September, 1772. 
29 June, 1755. 

13 September, 1760. 





















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! 









102 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



Ross, John 

Ross, John 

Ross, Robert 

Ross, Robert 

Ross, Thomas 

Ross, Walter 

Roth, Thomas [also Wroth] 

Rous, Thomas 

Rowan, John 
Royce, Vere 
Rudyerd, Richard 
Ramsey, James 
Russell, Christopher 
Russell, Lockhart 

Russell, Peter 

Rutherford, John 
Rutherford, John 
Rutherford, Robert 
Rutherford, Samuel 

Rutherford, Samuel 

Rutherford, Walter 
Ruvynes, Fra. Gab. de 
Ruxton, Charles 
Ruxton, Charles 
Rycaut, Paul 

Ryder, William 



Ryves, Thomas 

St. Clair, Alexander 
St. Clair, Arthur 

St. Clair, David 

St. Clair, James 



St. Clair, .James 
St. Clair, James 
St. Clair, Sir John, Bt. 



Captain 


95 


25 February, 1760. 


Captain 


31 


8 November, 1763. 


Lieut. 


34 


31 July, 1762. 


Lieut. 


15 


28 September, 1757 


Major 


48 


20 March, 1758. 


Captain 


78 


23 July, 1757. 


Captain 


40 


18 March, 1758. 


Ensign 


1 


2 February, 1757. 


Lieut. 


1 


27 June, 1762. 


Ensign 


45 


26 March, 1758. 


Lieut. 


45 


14 May, 1761. 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


20 November, 1757. 


Lieut. 


48 


2 July, 1755. 


Ensign 


60 


27 July, 17 68. 


Ensign 


42 


17 March, 1764. 


Captain 


17 


1 June, 1750. 


Ensign 


45 


15 August, 1759. 


Lieut. 


45 


27 September, 1762 


1 st Lieut. 


94 


9 January, 1760. 


Adj't 


94 


12 Januarv, 1760. 


Captain 


N.Y. 


31 December, 1741. 


Major 


G2 


6 January, 1756. 


Captain 


58 


29 December, 1755. 


Lieut. 


15 


4 September, 1754. 


Captain 


15 


26 September, 1760 


Ensign 


15 


2 May, 1762. 


Ensign 


60 


2 March, 1770. 


Captain 


62 


30 December, 1755. 


Captain 


60 


25 December, 1759. 


Lieut. 


28 


16 February, 1756. 


Captain 


35 


5 June, 1762. 


Capt. Lt. 


17 


2 February, 1757. 


Captain 


17 


10 July, 1758. 


Ensign 


62 


15 January, 1756. 


Lieut. 


60 


14 May, 1757. 


Lieut. 


9 


24 October, 1760. 


Ensign 


60 


21 December, 1770. 


Captain 


42 


17 July, 1758. 


Ensign 


60 


13 May, 1757. 


Lieut. 


60 


17 April, 1759. 


Ensign 


29 


13 February, 1765. 


Lieut. 


29 


12 July, 1770. 


Colonel 


1 


27 June, 1737. 


Lt. Gcn'l 




4 June, 1745. 


General 




10 March, 1761. 


Lieut. 


22 


8 March. 1757. 


Captain 


45 


10 March, 1761. 


Dep't Q r . M r 






Gen. 


Br. 


1755 


Lt. Col. 


62 


6 January, 1756. 


Colonel 




19 February, 1762. 


Lt. Col. 


28 


2 March, 1766. 














• 






















































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■ 




















































































































































































1895.] 



British Officers serving in America, 



1G3 



St. Clair, Jolm Charles 
St. Clair, Patrick 
St. George, Capel 



St. John, Ellis 
St. Leger, Barry 
St. Loe, George 

Sampson, Henry 



Sand ford, Eflward 

Sandfbrd, William 

Sandys, William 
Sarly, Robert 

Saunders, Thomas 



Saunders, 

Savage, James 
Savage, John 
Savage, Marm. Coghill 
Sawer, Thomas 
Saxton, John 



Schlaetler, Michael 
Schlagel, George Edward 
Schlosser, Francis 
Schlosser, John Charles 
Schlosser, John Joseph 



Schneider, Gcorgo 
Schornherg, Henry 

Schrader, ■ 

Schuyler, Courtlandt 
Schuyler, Ranslaer 



Scott, George 
Scott, IIu<rh 



Scott, John 
Scott, John 
Scott, Robert 
Scott, Robert 
Scott, Thomas 
Scott, William 



Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


15 


Lieut. 


17 


Captain 


17 


Q r . M'. 


17 


Ensign 


9 


Captain 


48 


Captain 


40 


Major 


40 


Lieut. 


31 


Q'. M'. 


31 


Captain 


31 


Colonel 


10 


Maj. Gen. 




Ensign 


3L 


Lieut. 


31 


Lieut. 


59 


Ensign 


47 


Lieut. 


47 


Ensign 


27 


Lieut. 


27 


Ensign 


35 


Ensign 


34 


Ensign 


17 


Lieut. 


52 


Captain 


95 


Captain 


94 


Captain 


17 


Captain 


17 


Chaplain 


GO 


2' 1 Lieut. 


21 


Ensign 


CO 


Ensign 


GO 


Lieut. 


G2 


Capt. Lt. 


GO 


Captain 


GO 


Ensign 


GO 


l flt Lieut. 


40 


Captain 


62 


Captain 


60 


Ensign 


GO 


Lieut. 


CO 


Captain 


40 


Ensign 


35 


Ensign 


28 


Lieut. 


28 


Colonel 


2G 


Ensign 


1 


2 (i Lieut. 


94 


Surgeon 


29 


Ensign 


42 


Adj'. 


48 


Ensign 


48 



30 July, 1758. 
24 October, 1761. 
22 November, 1756. 

18 September, 17C0. 
2 April, 1759. 

8 May, 17G5. 
24 March, 1758. 
24 November, 1749. 

24 March, 1761. 

25 September, 1757. 

13 December, 17G3. 
25 December, 1 770. 

14 January, 17G3. 
22 February, 176 L 

15 September, 17G3. 
8 May, 17G7. 

7 December, 17C4. 
2 April, 1759. 

G December, 1760. 
27 April, 1756. 

11 July, 1759. 

24 July, 1764. 

2 February, 1757. 

19 February, 17G6. 
6 March, 17C0. 

3 March, 17 GO. 
1G May, 17G2. 

25 December, 1765. 
25 March, 1757. 

22 February, 17G8. 
21) August, 1759. 
31 October, 1770. 

27 December, 1755. 

12 May, 175G. 

20 January, 1758. 

20 April, 1762. 
3 July, 1755. 

14 January, 1756. 

8 November, 17G5. 
8 March, 1757. 

1 June, 1759. 

28 June, 1751. 

5 October, 17 GO. 

21 October, 17G1. 

23 October, 17G2. 

14 January, 17G3. 

29 April, 1762. 

2G February, 17 GO. 

22 December, 17G9. 
1G September, 1760 

15 June, 17G0. 
28 August, 1761. 
















. 














































































































































































































' 












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KM BritiSi 

Scaly, .John 
Sears, Samuel 

Sebright, Sir John, Bt. 



Sedgwick, Hunter 
Selon, Sir Henry, Bt. 

Seymour, Rob. Martin 
Seymour, Win. Edward 

Sliaak, Roger 
Sharpe, Richard 

Sharpe, William, Sen. 

Sharpe, William, Jr. 

Shaw, Alexander 

Shaw, Alexander 

Shaw, Daniel 
Shaw, John 

Shaw, Lauchlan 
Shaw, Robert 
Shaw, Robert 

Shavve, Merrick [Meyrick" 

Shawe, William 
Shawe, William 

Shaw, 

Shoe, John 
Sheppard, John 

Sheridan, Hen : Fortick 
Sherlock, William 

Sherriff, Charles 

Sherriff. William 



Shillitoe, George 
Ship ton, William 
Shirley, William 
Shorne, Olivir [Shrone] 

Showrd, Daniel 



Jicers serving in J 


\mcmcct. 1 Ar 


Lieut. 


GO 


28 January, 1756. 


Lieut. 


62 


23 August, 1758. 


Ensign 


GO 


4 October, 17 GO. 


Colonel 


18 


1 April, 17G2. 


Maj. Gen. 




13 March, 1761. 


Lt. Gen. 




30 Aprils 1770. 


Lieut. 


34o 


1 October, 1757. 


Captain 


78 


17 July, 1757. 


Captain 


17 . 


22 April, 1759. 


Ensign 


40 


10 April, 1764. 


Lieut. 


47 


29 June, 1755. 


Adf 


47 


2 July, 1757. 


Captain 


22 


21 September, 1756. 


2' 1 Lieut. 


40 


26 February, 1756. 


Lieut. 


40 


2 April, 176.2. 


Adj fc 


9 


20 November, 1756. 


Lieut, 


9 


24 February, 17G2. 


Ensign 


9 


8 September, 17G2. 


Lieut. 


9 


23 March, 1764. 


Ensign 


62 


5 January, 1 756. 


Lieut. 


60 


12 December, 1756. 


Adjt. 


GO 


6 October, 1761. 


Ensign 


GO 


17 December, 1756. 


Lieut. 


GO 


2 June, 1759. 


Captain 


M 


1G August, 1762. 


Ensign 


17 


25 May, 1759. 


Lieut. 


17 


21 August, 1761. 


Lieut. 


So. Ca. 


25 November, 1754. 


Lieut. 


43 


21 September, 1756. 


Ensign 


64 


1 January, 17GG. 


Lieut. 


64 


2 February, 1770. 


Ensign 


10 


11 September, 1765. 


Lieut. 


10 


26 December, 1770. 


Ensign 


43 


3 October, 1761. 


Lieut. 


40 


17 October, 17G2. 


Ensign 


18 


15 August, 17GG. 


Captain 


18 


1 January, 17GG. 


Ensign 


28 


22 November, 1756. 


Lieut. 


28 


11 June, 1762. 


Lieut. 


31 


25 May, 1772. 


Ensign 


J 


\6 July, 1758. 


Lieut. 


1 


20 September, 1760. 


Ensign 


45 


2 July, 1755. 


Lieut. 


45 


15 April, 1759. 


Lieut. 


47 


25 June, 1755. 


Adj't 


47 


25 September, 1759. 


Capt. It. 


47 


15 February, 1761. 


E n sign 


28 


22 October, 17G2. 


1 st Lieut. 


Rangers 


25 September, 1761. 


Bee. to Com 


. Br. 


1755. 


Ensign 


27 


27 April, 1756. 


Lieut. 


27 


23 October, 1761. 


Ensign 


8 


27 May, 1771. 














































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• 1 ■ 










































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1 






































































, 



















































1895.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



165 



Shrigley, Francis 
Shrubsole, William 



Shuckburg, Richard 
Shuckborgfh, Richard 



Silvestor, Thomas 
Simcocks, Henry 
Simpson. Ambrose 
Simpson, Andrew 

Simpson, Andrew 
Simpson, Andrew 
Simpson, John Joseph 
Simpson, Noah 

Sinclair, Charles 
Sinclair, ( ieorge 
Sinclair, George 
Sinclair, George 
Sinclair, John 
Sinclair, Patrick 

Sinclair, William 
Skene, David 
Skene, Philip 

Skene, Philip 
Skene, Robert 

Skene, William 

Skey, Boughey 

Skinner, John 
Skinner, William 
Skinner, Wm. Ann 

Slater, John 
Small, John 



Smelt, Cornelius 

Smelt, Thomas 
Smibert, William 
Smith, Burton 

Smith, Oaiow 

Smith, Edward 
Smith, Edward 
Smith, Francis 

VOL. XLIX. 



Ensign 


22 


Ensign 


So. Ca. 


Lieut. 


So. Ca. 


Capt. Lt. 


N. Y. 


Surgeon 


N. Y. 


Surgeon 


17 


Q r . i\P. 


So 


Lieut. 


62 


Ensign 


59 


Lieut. 


44 


Capt. Lt. 


44 


Captain 


80 


Captain 


35 


I st Lieut. 


94 


Ensign 


31 


Lieut. 


31 


Ensign 


78 


Lieut. 


12 


Lieut. 


42 


Captain 


05 


Captain 


77 


Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


42 


Ensign 


58 


Captain 


28 


Captain 


27 


Captain 


10 


Major 


52 


Captain 


59 


Lieut. Col. 




Ensign 


15 


Lieut. 


15 


Captain 


43 


Major 


43 


Ensign 


1G 


Captain 


94 


Ensign 


35 


Lieut. 


35 


Ensign 


27 


Lieut. 


42 


Captain 


42 


Captain 


42 


Ensign 


14 


Lieut. 


14 


Captain 


47 


Ensign 


26 


Ensign 


22 


Lieut. 


22 


Ensign 


16 


Lieut. 


i 10 


Captain 


58 


Major 


60 


Lt. Col. 


10 



15 



17 September, 1760. 

29 May, 1747. 

26 September, 1754. 

21 May, 1755. 

25 June, 1737. 

29 December, 1762. 

22 March, 1761. 

24 January, 1756. 

6 October, 1769. 

26 June, 1755. 

15 September, 1758. 

16 August, 1760. 
4 October, 1760. 

7 March, 1760. 

8 May, 1767. 

26 December, 1770. 

23 July, 1760. 

17 July, 1758. 

30 December, 1758. 

28 February, 1766. 
4 January, 1757. 
21 July, "l 758. 

27 July, 1760. 

29 April, 1760. 
6'Oetober, 1762. 

2 February, 1757. 

26 May, 1768. 

19 December, 1764. 
14 April, 1756. 

14 October, 1758. 
2 October, 1757. 
21 December, 1758. 
2 May, 1751. 

25 March, 1761. 

4 September, 1772. 
10 March, 1760. 
10 April, 1756. 

27 July, 1759. 

10 November, 1761. 

11 April, 1756. 
2 August, 1762. 

30 April, 1765. 

12 June, 1763. 

21 February, 1772. 

20 March, 1758. 

12 January, 1770. 

25 October, 1756. 

17 September, 1760. 

18 June, 1766. 

13 April, 1772. 

26 January, 1758. 
M October, 1761. 
13 February, 1762. 









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■ 



























































































































166 



British Officers serving in America, 



[April, 



Smith, George Amos 
Smith, John 
Smith, John 



Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smith, 
Smyth, 
Smyth, 
Smyth, 
Snowe, 



Job n 

Lawrence 
Marcus 
Richard 
Richard 

William 
William 
William 
CI arles 
llervey 
William 
William 



Soubiran, William 
Soumain, Simon 
Southwell, John 

Spaight, William 

Spann, Thomas 
Spanye, .John 
Spencer, Boyle 

Spencer, Thomas 
Spendlove, Roger 
Spering, William 
Spiesmacher, Fred. Christo- 
pher 



Spike, William 
Spilsburg, John 
Spital, John 

Splaine, William 
Spread, William 
Sproule, George 
Stain forth, Ceorge 
Stannus, Ephraim 
Stannus, Thomas [or John] 

Stanton, Jeremiah 
Stanton, John 

Stanwix, John 

Stanwix, Thomas 
Stapleton, F. S. 



Lieut. 


52 


Captain 


52 


Ensign 


42 


Lieut. 


42 


Ensign 


9 


Lieut. 


9 


Ensign 


65 


Ensign 


44 


Col. Com. 


60 


Chaplain 


52 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


Captain 


16 


Lieut. 


18 


Captain 


64 


Ensign 


28 


Captain 


15 


Ensign 


17 


Ensign 


64 


Adj 1 . 


64 


Lieut. 


55 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


Q r . M r . 


17 


Q r . M'. 


35 


Ensign 


65 


Lieut. 


65' 


Captain 


28 


Q r . M r . 


9 


Ensign 


58 


Lieut. 


46 


Captain 


43 


Lieut. 


N. Y. 


Lieut. 


60 


Capt. Lt. 


60 


Captain 


60 


Captain 


17 


2' 1 Lieut. 


94 


Captain 


47 


Major 


47 


Adj't 


52 


Lieut. 


43 


Ensign 


? 


Captain 


18 


Captain 


64 


Ensign 


22 


Lieut. 


22 


Captain 


62 


Lieut. 


14 


Capt. Lt 


M 


Col. Com 1 


62 


Maj. Gen. 




Captain 


62 


Ensign 


9 



7 December, 1764. 

3 March, 1772. 

15 May, 1757. 

26 July, 1758. 

13 September, 1762. 
19 December, 1768. 

16 May, 1766. 

11 November, 1761. 
15 January, 1756. 

30 January, 1760. 

27 May, 1765. 

11 September, 1765. 
18 June, 1766. 

15 July, 1766. 

8 November, 1756. 
10 May, 1765. 

16 August, 1768. 
26 January, 1770. 

31 January, 1756. 

10 November, 1750. 

18 September, 1760. 

19 January, 1763. 

4 May, 1765. 

12 January, 1770. 

28 August, 1753. 
19 December, 1768. 

12 January, 1758. 

13 December, 1752. 

9 April, 1756. 

16 August, 1750. 

21 January, 1756. 
13 July, 1761. 

4 October, 1770. 
21 April, 1753. 

2 January, 1762. 

24 November, 1755. 
1 March, 1760. 

11 October, 1762. 

25 February, 1757. 

13 February, 1765. 

3 May, 1765. 

12 November, 1768. 
9 April, 1756. 

5 July, 1758. 

4 January, 1756. 

14 November, 1761. 
21 February, 1772. 
1 January, 1756. 
25 June, 1759. 

18 January, 1 756. 
4 September, 1762. 






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I 



1895.] 



British Officers serving in America. 



107 



Steel, William Snow 
Steele, George 
Steele, Parker 
Steele, Robert 
Steele, Samuel 
Steele, Thomas 
Steele, Samuel 
Stephenson, James 
Sterling, Robert 
Stert, Robert 

Stevens, Alexander 

Stevens, Richard 
Stevenson, .lames 
Stevenson, James 

Stewart, Adam 
Stewart, Allan 
Stewart, Allan 

Stewart, David 

Stewart, Duncan 
Stewart, Francis 
Stewart, James 
Stewart, James 
Stewart, James 



Stewart, James 
Stewart, -John 
Stewart, Robert 
Stewart, Samuel 
Stewart, Walter 
Stewart., William 
Stewart, William 
Stiener, Lewis 
Stileman, John 
Stirke, Julius 

Stirling, Thomas 
Stobo, Robert 
Stockbausen, Conrad 
Stordy, Robert 
Storey, James 
StcHtghton, John 
Strachan, Patrick 
Stratford, Henry 
Strickland, John 
Strodtman, Benjamin 
Strong, John 



Lieut. 

Captain 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Surgeon 

Captain 

Captain 

Q r . M r . 

Surgeon 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Captain 

Captain 

Chaplain 

Adj't 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Chaplain 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

1 " l Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Captain 

Captain 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Surgeon 

Lieut. 

2' 1 Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Capt. Lt. 

Captain 



GO 23 June, 17G0. 

8 5 May, 17G9. 
29 [1766.] 

29 3 May, 17 Go. 

34 23 February, 17G5. 

29 21 June, 1769. 

42 30 July, 175!). 

47 21 March, 1758. 

48 11 November, 1755. 
45 14 August, 1759. 
45 2 April, 17G2. 

G2 27 November, 175G. 

GO 13 April, 1759. 

45 12 March, 1755. 

G2 4 February, 175G. 

28 20 Julv, 1764. 

60 4 December, 1767. 

42 5 August, 1758. 

77 12 January, 1757. 

77 1.5 September, 1758. 

77 31 December, 1761. 

GO G April, 1759. 
60 17G0. 

42 17 July, 1757. 

2G ' 25 December, 1770. 

42 18 July, 1757. 

42 20 December, 1757. 

64 20 January, 17G4. 

64 7 December, 17G4. 

G4 12 Januarv, 1770. 

29 17 July, 1>65. 

18 13 February, 17G5. 

GO 15 September, 1758. 

GO 10 April, 1761. 

21 10 April, 17G5. 

27 17 April, 1759. 

4G 21 June, 17G5. 

G2 10 December, 1756. 

15 15 August, 1758. 

10 13 February, 17G2. 

10 28 June, 1771. 

42 21 July, 1757. 

15 5 June, 17G0. 

60 23 August, 1758. 

31 9 February, 1770. 

GO 1G April, 1762. 

N. Y. 15 December, 1758. 

21 2 December, 1768. 

47 28 March, 1758. 

GO 13 April, 1767. 

GO 20 March, 1761. 

26 18 April, 17GG. 

26 31 October, 1770. 










. 










































































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108 



British Officers serving in America, 



[April, 



Strong, John Kennedy 

Stuart, Adam 
Stuart, Alexander 
Stuart, Allan 

Stuart, Charles 

Stuart, Charles Augustus 
Stuart, Donald 
Stuart, Donald 
Stuart, George 
Sfuart, James 

Stuart, James 
Stuart, James 



Stuart, John 
Stuart, John 
Stuart, John 
Stuart, Kenneth 
Stuart, Patrick 
Stuart, Walter 
Stuart, Walter 
Stuart, William 

Stubhs, Thomas 



Studholm, 

Stud holme, Gilfred 
Sullivan, Daniel 

Sutherland, James 

Sutherland, John 
Sutherland, John 
Sutherland, Nicholas 
Sutherland, Nicholas 



Sutherland, Patrick 
Sutherland, Patrick 
Sutherland, William 
Swan, Rowland 

Swottenham, George 
Swettenhain, George 



Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Adj't 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Q'. W. 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Adj't 

Surgeon 

Captain 

Captain 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Ensign 

1 st Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Adjt. 

Captain 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Lieut. 

Captain 

Lieut. 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Capt. Lt. 

Captain 

Captain 

Major 

Captain 

Major 

Ensign 

Ensign 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 

Lieut. 



64 

42 
42 
78 
78 
78 
78 
21 
77 
27 
55 
58 
58 

1 
17 
17 
17 
4G 
42 
77 
78 
42 
17 
94 
62 - 
60 
95 
52 
52 
52 
27 
40 
55 
55 
26 
26 
42 
42 
62 
77 
77 
77 
21 
21 
45 
77 
95 
26 
26 
17 
So. Ca. 

9 



28 August, 1772. 

21 July, 1758. 

7 January, 1757. 

10 June, 1758. 

25 September, 1759. 
23 July, 1760. 
7 December, 1 764. 
12 January, 1757. 

11 July, 1759. 

3 January, 1756. 

5 May, 1756. 

1 March, 1758. 

2 February, 1757. 

29 July, 1759. 

6 May*, 1762. 

6 May, 1762. 

31 August, 1762. 
20 July, 1758. 
16 July, 1762. 
29 April, 1760. 
29 January, 1756. 

23 July, 1759. 

2 December, 1760. 

2 February, 1756. 

25 May, 1757. 

7 March, 1760. 

3 May, 1765. 

20 June, 1768. 

6 March, 1771. 

22 November, 1756. 
10 November, 1761. 
28 December, 1755. 

26 July, 1758. 

12 August, 1768. 
2 March, 1770. 
10 April, 1756. 

27 July, 1759. 

14 January, 1756. 

8 January, 1757. 

15 September, 1758. 
31 December, 1761. 
14 March, 1765. 

21 February, 1772. 

24 February, 1749-50. 

22 March, 1761. 

28 June, 1762. 

13 February, 1762. 

7 September, 1768. 
22 March, 1758. 
28 February. 1760. 

8 August, 1764. 














• 














































































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1895.] British 


Officers serving in 


America. '. 


Swift, John 


Lieut. 


62 


20 January, 1756. 




Lieut. 


22 


27 April, 1756. 


Swords, Thomas 


Ensign 


55 


16 August, 1760. 


Sjmcocks, Henry 


Lieut. 


27 


27 April, 1756. 


Syines, Richard 


Adj't 


14 


27 March, 1765. 




Lieut. 


14 


15 July, 1767. 


Symes, Richard 


Captain 


52 


6 July, 1772. 


Talbot, James 


Captain 


43 


2 February, 1757. 


Talbot, lion. Sharington 


Colonel 


43 


24 March, 1761. 




Maj. Gen. 




28 February, 1761. 


Tassel 1, Charles 


Lieut. 


28 


22 January, 1755. 




Adj't 


28 


9 April, 1756. 


i 


Capt. Lt. 


28 


4 August, 1762. 




Captain 


28 


9 September, 1762. 


Tayler, William 


Lt. Col. 


9 


1 July, 1763. 


Taylor, Charles 


Ensign 


So. Ca 


. 13 September, 1754. 




Lieut. 


So. Ca 


. 5 May, 1756. 


Taylor, William 


Ensign 


28 


19 January, 1763. 


Taylor, William Theodore 


, 1 st Lieut. 


21 


11 October, 1766. 


Teesdale, Christopher 


Lt. Col. 


48 


25 March, 1762. 


Teesdale, William 


Ensign 


69 


13 July, 1761. 


Templer, Dudley 


Major 


26 


18 April, 1766. 




Lt. Col. 


26 


7 September, 1768. 


Tew, Francis 


Lieut. 


17 


2 February, 1757. 


Th el well, David 


Ensign 


34 


25 December, 1764. 


Thiring, Anthony 


2 d Lieut. 


21 


17 May, 1762. 




Q r . M r . 


21 


4 April, 1765. 


Thomas, Daniel 


Chaplain 


18 


8 October, 1767. 


Thomas, Edwin 


Surgeon 


16 


14 May, 1768. 


Thomas, James 


Lieut. 


44 


19 February, 1762. 


Thomas, John 


Chaplain 


60 


15 August, 1764. 


Thomas, Robert 


Ensign 


26 


2 March, 1770. 


Thomasson, Thomas 


Surgeon 


18 


18 February, 1767. 




Ensign 


18 


14 June, 1771. 


Thompson, Clot worthy 


Ensign 


69 


18 July, 1766. 


Thompson, Edward 


Ensign. 


26 


5 March, 1760. 




Adj't 


26 


22 February, 1769. 




Lieut. 


26 


1 March, 1770. 


Thompson, John 


Lieut. 


52 


27 April, 1768. 


Thompson, John 


Lieut. 


69 


24 June, 1761. 


Thompson, Joseph 


Lieut. 


95 


[1763.] 


Thompson, Primrose 


Ensign 


31 


19 February, 1766. 


Thompson, William 


Lieut. 


10 


13 February, 1762. 


1 \\ i"kTY~i »-VC'A t i 


Ensign 


40 


28 June, 1762. 


JL 11UIJJ [JoUIl a " ■ — 


Thomson, Alexander 


Ensign 


42 


29 July, 1759. 


Thomson, George 


Chaplain 


40 




Thorne, George 


Captain 


22 


31 October, 1762. 


Thwaites, George 


Lieut. 


10 


27 March, 1767. 




Adj't 


10 


14 December, 1770. 


Tick ell, Thomas 


Ensign 


65 


26 December, 1770. 


Timpson, Robert 


Ensign 


22 


16 January, 1759. 




Lieut.. 


22 


12 November, 1761. 


VOL. XLIX. 1.4* 


d 







169 






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170 



British Officers serving in America. 



[April, 



Tolme, Kenneth 

Tonge, Winkworth 
Tottenham, Nicholas 
Tottenham, Synge 



Townshend, Rt. Hon. 
George, Viscount 

Townshend, Philip 
Townshend, Thomas 

Tracey, Godfrey 
Travers, J. Moore 
Treby, John 

Trickett, Thomas 
'Prist, Nicholas 

Trotter, 

Tucker, Daniel 
Tudor, Edward 
Tudor, Richard 

Tuiter, Marcus Anthony 5 

Tullikens, John 



Turing, Inglis 
Turnbull, Alexander 

Turnhull, George 

Turner, George 
Turner, Samuel 

Turner, Thomas 
Tuting, George 

Tyrwhitt, William 

Urmston, Edward 

Urquhart, James 
Ustick, William 

Usher, Christophor 
Usher, Thomas 



Lieut. 


42 


Captain 


42 


Lieut. 


45 


Ensign 


58 


Ensign 


28 


Lieut. 


28 


Adj't 


28 


Colonel 


28 


Maj. Gen. 




Captain 


22 


Ensigu 


22 


Lieut. 


22 


Ensigu . 


18 


Captain 


69 


Lieut. 


44 


Captain 


44 


Q 1 . W. 


44 


Ensign 


18 


1 st Lieut 


91 


Ensign 


GO 


Ensign 


43 


Q r . M r . 


95 


Ensign 


95 


Ensign 


10 


Lieut. 


10 


Captain 


62 


Major 


60 


Major 


45 


Lt. Col. 




Lt. Col. 


45 


Chaplain 


52 


Lieut. 


42 


Captain 


42 


Lieut. 


62 


Captain 


60 


Lieut. 


So. Ca 


Lieut. 


18 


Adj;t 


18 


Ensign 


47 


Surg's Mate 


Br. 


Surgeon 


62 


Captain 


15 


Colonel 


65 


Maj. Gen. 




Lieut. 


14 


Ensign 


47 


Lieut. 


47 


Captain 


15 


Lieut. 


16 



23 January, 1756. 
27 July, 1760. 

8 April, 1755. 

11 Eehruary, 1758. 

16 February, 1756. 

3 October, 1760. 

9 September, 1762. 

24 October, 1759. 
6 March, 1761. 
27 April, 1756. 

23 November, 1757. 

10 March, 1761. 

11 September, 1765. 

20 November, 1765. 
10 March, 1753. 

15 September, 1758. 

14 August, 1761. 

26 December, 1770. 

21 July, 1760. 

6 May, 1761. 

7 March, 1762. 
13 April, 1762. 

1762. 
1 January, 1766. 

4 December, 1769. 

25 December, 1755. 

26 April, 1757. 

25 February, 1760. 

21 October, 1761. 

24 April, 1762. 

19 July, 1769. 

27 January, 1756. 

4 June, 1762. 

5 February, 1756. 

15 November, 1765. 
1 January, 1762. 

4 March, 1760. 

17 March, 1761. 

27 May, 1760. 

[1755.] 

I February, 1756. 

22 March, 1761. 

10 November, 1770. 
10 July, 1762. 

II January, 1763. 
9 June, 1758. 

1 March, 1760. 
4 September, 1754. 

20 November, 1765. 



Also given as Tuit and Tuite. 









. 
















































• 



1895.] 



British Officers serving in America, 



171 



Vage, Thomas 
Valle, John de la 
Van Braarn, Jacob 
Vanderdussen, Tho : 
Vanlevven, Meade 
Varloe, Thomas 
Vatass, John 
Vaughan, John 
Vauidian, I Ion. John 



Vaughan, Thomas 

Veal, Richard 
Vere, Alexander 
Verner, Thomas 

Vesey, Agmondesham 

Vibart, James 

Vibart, James 
Vickers, John 
Vignoles, Francis 

Vigors, Mich : Aylward 

Vincent, Richard 
Vintner, Thomas 
Von Ingen, Ja. 
Von Ingen, l'etor 



Wade, George 
Wadman, Arthur 
Wadman, Francis 



Walbauck, Temple 
Walker, 1 Ienry 
Walker, Thomas 

Walker, 

Walkenshaw, J; Craufurd 

Wall, James 
Wall, John 
Wallace, Francis 

Wallace, Hans 

Wallace, Hugh 

Wallace Magi 11 

Wallace, St. John [also HiW] 

Waller, William 



Surgeon 


59 


Lieut. 


35 


Captain 


60 


Ensign 


17 


Captain 


21 


Captain 


31 


Captain 


10 


Captain 


17 


Lieut. Col 




Com'd't 


9-1 


Lt. Col. 


46 


Capt. Lt. 


45 


Captain 


45 


Surgeon 


45 


Surgeon 


58 


Ensign 


10 


Lieut. 


10 


Ensign 


22 


Lieut. 


22 


Lieut. 


29 


Q r . M r . 


29 


Ensign 


44 


Lieut. 


22 


Capt. Lt. 


31 


Captain 


31 


Ensign 


29 


Lieut. 


29 


Captain 


16 


Lieut. 


15 


Lieut. 


62 


Lieut. 


62 


Capt. Lt. 


60 


Ensign 


28 


Lieut. 


26 


Lieut. 


18 


Capt. Lt. 


18 


Ensign 


34 


Ensign 


15 


Chaplain 


58 


1 st Lieut. 


40 


Captain 


Rangers 


Capt. Lt. 


78 


Captain 


78 


Captain 


1 


Lieut. 


69 


Ensign 


45 


Lieut. 


45 


Ensign 


45 


Ensign 


55 


Ensign 


17 


Ensign 


14 


Ensign 


14 



1 February, 1766. 

11 December, 17f>2. 

19 September, 1761. 

20 August, 1761. 

8 May, 1758. 

17 August, 1761. 

5 May, 1760. 

21 September, 1756. 

12 January, 1769. 

25 November, 1762. 

19 March, 1758. 
7 April, 1761. 

30 September, 1750. 

26 January, 1756. 

27 March, 1767. 

6 May, 1772. 

21 September, 1756. 

26 May, 1760. 

13 February, 1762. 

17 July, 1765. 
23 July, 1758. 

3 May, 1757. 
25 April, 1765. 
29 July, 1765. 

22 December, 1769. 

27 January, 1772. 

14 August, 1765. 
29 July, 1758. 

29 February, 1756. 

2 January, 1756. 

23 August, 1758. 

16 May, 1762. 

29 November, 1760. 

20 November, 1756. 

4 February, 1769. 
25 August, 1762. 

5 October, 1757. 

4 February, 1756. 

30 June, 1755. 

25 September, 1761. 

5 January, 1757. 

9 June, 1*758. 

16 February, 1756. 
14 May, 1759. 
16 August, 1759. 

14 December, 1762. 

18 April, 1757. 

28 November, 1759. 

15 May, 1760. 
9 April, 1771. 

6 January, 1762. 




































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172 Capt. John Thomas of Braintree, Mass. [April, 



CAPT. JOHN THOMAS OF BHAINTREE, MASS. 

By the Hon. Joseph \V. Porter of Bangor, Maine. 

Among the notable men who lived in ancient Braintree, Mass., 
was Capt. John Thomas, an English shipmaster, who came to Boston 
prior to 1700. Capt. Thomas was master of an English ship in 
1688, and carried dispatches to William, Prince of Orange, in 
Holland, and in October of the same year brought the Prince and 
Queen Mary to England. Researches in the British Archives by a 
descendant confirm these statements. 

In 1750 his only son John Thomas, Jr., conceived the idea of 
writing to the English government for a donation or annuity. 
Among the papers in the family now is a copy of the petition sent 
to the Duke of .Newcastle, Secretary for the Colonies : 

" May it please your Grace soever humbling to beg your pardon for 
troubling your Lordship with this small affair, and would beg your Grace's 
leave to acquaint your Lordship that your eminent ability in your exalted 
station, and your Grace 8 remarkable generosity to human kind which has 
rendered your Lordship's name in high esteem with us in New England 
has emboldened me to lay this small affair before your Grace Your Grace 
will perceive by the papers annexed that Mr. Thomas my father was in- 
strumental in bringing about the Revolution in 1G88, and that his coming 
over to New England and dying here in obscurity might be the reason he 
was not remembered for his said services and as I have an aged mother to 
support now who is the widow of the said Mr. Thomas, and myself being 
his only son I ever humbly pray ycur Grace s kind indulgence herein and 
if your Grace in your generosity may be pleased to grant me the least 
mark of your favor it will beget in me such a delightful sense of love and 

respect to your Lordship 8 name and honor as never will be forgotten 

* * * " 

The " papers annexed " were the following, copies of which, writ- 
ten at the time, are now in the family : 

''These may Certifie all whom it may concern That We the Subscribers 
being well acquainted with Capt John Thomas in his Life time who was a 
Gentleman ot ' unquestionable- Truth of singular Piety Prudence and fidelity 
heard the said Captn Thomas say that he carried the Paquet of letters sent 
from England to Holland in the year 1G88 immediately before the Revolu- 
tion To their Highnesses the Prince and Princess of Orange which letters 
informed their Highnesses of the Great trouble the English Nation then 
Groaned Under that the importance and Hazard of conveying those letters 
at that time was so great that ho was ohlidged to conceal them between tho 
lineing iind outside of his coal that ho then wore And that notwithstand- 
ing his being brought too and examined in his passage to Holland by an 
English men of war he delivered those letters safe to their Highnesses and 
that, he was Master of the Yateh which brought over the Prince of Orange 
upon the Revolution that King William and Queen Mary upon their ar- 






I 

I 

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1895.] Capt. John Thomas of Braintree, Mass. 173 

rival in England ware so deeply engaged in settling the Great and import- 
ant affairs of the Nation then greatly embarrassed by strong attempt to 
bring in Popery and Arbitrary Power Capt" Thomas had that Convenient 
opportunity to make his application for a Reward of his hazardous services 
and finding that his own personal safety he was obliged to Remove in that 
critical & troublesome time he accordingly came over to New Ehigland 
& Settled at Braintree and so Never Received any Consideration for the 
aforementioned service he looked upon to be of the greatest consequence. 
Capt, 11 Thomas Dyed soon after this Relation by him made to us: when we 
Reflect upon the unspeakable Blessings which the British Nation enjoys 
even to this day consequent upon the Coming in of King William the third 
of Glorious Memory we hold ourselves bound to Love, and honor them that 
ware any ways instrumental in bringing about that Glorious Event and to 
us it is Very evident that Capt n Thomas performed the aforesaid Service 
with the utmost Hazard of bis Life and Sincerely believe from the Per- 
sonal Knowledge we had of that Gentleman that he undertook and per- 
formed the Same from a true desire to advance the Honour Happiness and 
prosperity of Great Britain which ho always seemed to have much at 
heart. 

We would further declare that we publish this Testimony to the world on 
the account of the high Esteem we have of the before named Capt 11 Thomas 
whose acquaintance & Conversation while liveing we had the greatest value 
for & Considering his Singular faithful Services beforenamed we think our 
Selves obliged to do all in our power to promote the good & welfare of his 
posterity and as he has but one male Heir who is a person of a Sober life 
and fare Character we humbly hope that the young man will meet with the 
favour of all wise men & true lovers of English liberty & Considering that the 
said Capt n Thomas deceased when his said Son was too young to Receive a 
Relation of this great affair we thought it highly just to give our Testimony 
thereof so far as we have heard it from Capt" Thomas s mouth Several times 
and do therefore hereunto freely Subscribe our Names the fourteenth day of 
September Anno Domino one thousand Seven hundred and Fifty. Ann og 
Regin Regis Georgii Secundi Magnee Britanniee Eranche et Hiberniee & 
Vicesimoquartom. 

Signd f Jacoij Nasit, 

Thomas Hunt, 
I .John 1 Iunt, 
I William Hunt, 
[.Ebknezer Hunt, 

Capt" Thomas mentioned above in this paper was a Gentleman Justly 
Esteemed by all that knew him with whom I was particularly acquainted 
as he lived alter he settled in Braintree in the Society to which I belong — 
he was a man of Singular Ingenuity of Enterprise knowledge and ac- 
quaintance with Kingdoms and Countrys who told me lie supposed that no 
man in his day had Sailed to & from so many ports in the several parts of 
the world as he had done: his activity & fidelity also Recoinended him to the 
great Trust Reposed in him in conveying letters from England to Holland 
directed to the prince of Orange which led to the happy Revolution & that 
those letters wain; so artfully Secreted by,quilting them in his clothes that 
had he been seized & Searched in all probability they would not have been 
discovered in which often he was remarkably instrumental in providence in 
bringing about that Great and Remarkable Change in the nation he also 



. 



■ 












174 Capt. John Thomas of Braintree, Mass, [April, 

acquainted me with Several hazardous & difficult Occurrences he ran 
through in that dangerous time & business but the length of time lias So 
much worn them out of my Remembrance that I cannot give a distinct 
naraiive of them but thus much is attested by me. 

Signed Samuel Nilks. 

Transcribed by John Proctor an adorer of that divine almighty power 
which brough in King William & placed ye house of Hanover on the British 
Throne." 

Of the signers to these papers, Jacob Nash, Thomas Hunt and 
Ebenezer Hunt were honored citizens of Weymouth ; John Hunt 
and Col. William Hunt were noted men in Braintree, and Rev. 
Samuel Niles was minister of the second church in Braintree from 
1710 until his death May 1st, 1762. His diary is now in the Thayer 
Library at South Braintree. 

The traditions of the family, quite well authenticated, are that 
an answer was made to these papers. 

Capt. Thomas took up his residence at North Weymouth, and 
married Lydia, daughter of Deacon Abiah 2 Whitman of that 
town. 

Deacon Abiah Whitman was son of Capt. John 1 Whitman, the 
emigrant, and lived on the homestead of his father at North Wey- 
mouth, which was on the north side of the road leading by the 
meeting house and directly oil' against it. Deacon Whitman was 
a large land owner in Faston, Mass. 

August 8, 1701, Abiah Whitman of Weymouth, " in consideration 
of the faithful service performed by James Hodge for Capt. John 
Thomas son in law to said Abiah Whitman," gave Hodge a lot of 
land in Kaston upon which he lived and died. 

Judge Kzckiel Whitman of Portland, Maine, printed a Genealogy 
of the Whitman Family in 1832, from which 1 quote : 

"The marriage of Capt. Thomas (to Lydia Whitman') was at- 
tended with circumstances savoring a little of the romantic. While 
on a visit to her relations in Boston, she caught the eye of Capt. 
Thomas, a respectable shipmaster then lately arrived from England. 
He was instantly captivated with her appearance, and followed her 
to her lodgings and immediately contrived to gain an introduction 
to the family and to her, and soon after married her and established 
himself in a very respectable style (near her father) in the town of 
Braintree." 

In the will of lie v. Samuel 3 Whitman of Farmington, Conn., 
son of Rev. Zecheriah 2 of Hull Sept. 13, 1750, he says : 

"It is my will and pleasure for diners reasons to me thereunto moving, 
that Lydia Whitman* who lived with my father as a maid many years and 
was afterward married to Capt. Thomas, who died leaving her a widow with 

* She was his own cousin. 



1895.] Capt. John Thomas of Braintree, Mass. 175 

several children; that said widow of Capt. Thomas have sixteen pounds 
Old Tenor out of my estate to he faithfully delivered to her * * * if 
living, if not to anv of her daughters or children that are." 

June 1, 1709, Capt. Thomas bought a lot of land in Braintree 
of Judge Samuel Sewall for £300. The lot was known as the 
"Webb Lot, now or lately occupied by Thomas Copeland John 
Hayford and Joseph Clark," and Avas bounded southerly by the 
Monatiquot river. It was on what is now Plain street, South 
Braintree, on the road to South Weymouth, and was owned by L. 
Bradford Ilollis in 1879. Capt. Thomas built a house and moved 
his family, and lived there until his death. The cellar of the house 
was visible a few years ago. 

Capt. Thomas took no part in public affairs, but confined himself 
wholly to his farm, lie died Oct. 4, 1714, and was buried in the 
Old North Burying Ground at Weymouth. His widow was appointed 
administratrix, and Stephen French, Israel Ford and Joseph Allen 
appraisers of the estate. They made their report Nov. 10, 1714, 
and the widow made her final report in April, 1717. The whole 
estate was valued at £1201 9s. 

I give some of the items : 

For 400 acres of land and buildings, . . . £700 00s 

" Money and apparel, . . . . ' 50 05 

" One Bond for money, . . . . 50 00 

" Two Tankards and Plate, . . . . 26 00 

'' Fire Arms, Sword &c, . . . . . 5 10 

" Bridles, Saddle, Portmantle & Pillion, . . 5 00 

" Cattle and Swine, 40 00 

tfc Three Negroes, a man, woman & hoy, . . 70 00 

" Copper and Brass Vessels, . . . .10 00 

" Three feather beds, . ., ■ . . . 12 00 

" Three looking glasses &c, . . . . 17 00 

" 15 chairs high and low, . . . . 3 15 

" Pictures in frames lined with leaf gold, . . 7 00 

" One set curt ins, . . . .' ■" . 1 00 

Mariner's Instruments &c, . . . . 3 05 

" Books all of them, . • , . . . 1!) 00 

As to the "Pictures in frames," one of them was of King Wil- 
liam, Prince of Orange, and is now in possession of a descendant 
of Capt; Thomas; another was, without doubt, a portrait of Queen 
Mary, and was in the Thayer branch of the family in Braintree 
after 1800. 

Of the negroes, Ivev. Samuel Niles in his diary under date of 
Feb. 27, 1718, says: "I married Tony a negroman and Penelope 
a negro woman, one of Mrs Thomas' negroes." 

Mrs. Thomas died in 1757. Pcv. Samuel Niles in his diary 
under date of April, 1757, says,; "The widow of Capt. John 
Thomas buried at Weymouth, where her husband the Captain had 



17(> Copt. John Thomas of Braintree, Mass. [April, 

been buried many years before. She was seized with an apoplectic 
lit and never spoke after." 

Her will of 9 March, 1753, proved 13 May, 1757. Son John 
was executor. She divided her estate among her children. She 
gave her negro woman, Rose, and her child, their freedom, provided 
that (hey support themselves without expense to her heirs. His 
children, 1 find, arc : 

1. Capt. John 1 Thomas had children: 

i. Andrew, 2 born in Weymouth 15 January, 1702; probably died 

young* 
ii. Lydia, born in Weymouth July 17, . She married William 

Salisbury of Braintree. I find four children born in Braintree: 

1. Ambrose 3 Salisbury, born 2 March, 1742; married his cousin 

Sarah 2 Whitman of Weymouth 24 April, 1773. She was born 
17 Oct. 1752. lie moved to Weymouth, and died there in 1804. 
The widow bought the first ancestor's estate and left it to her 
children. She died in 1828. Eleven children. Descendants 
i numerous and respectable. 

2. /Stephen 3 Salisbury, soldier in the French war. 

8; William? Salisbury; m. Sarah Hunt, both of Braintree, 12 July, 

17(54. 
4. Lydia 3 Salisbury, born 12 April, 1752. She married Phillip 
Thayer of Braintree 4 June, 1778. Many children, some of 
Whom had many relics which once belonged to Capt. John 
Thomas, 
iii. John, born in Braintree 27 Feb. 1710. Lived in Braintree and 

Weymouth, 
iv. Maky, born in Braintree 28 Nov. 1714. Her gravestone is in Copp's 
Hill Burying Ground, Boston, and has the following inscription 
thereon : " Here Lyes the Body of Mary Thomas dan. of Mr John 
and Mrs Lydia Thomas of Brantry dee d Sept. ye, 4 th . 1784, in the 
20 th year of her age." 

2. John 8 Thomas Jr. was horn in Braintree 27 Feb. 1710. He in- 
herited the homestead of his father. He married Silence, daughter 
of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Randall) Orcutt of South Weymouth 
SO Jan. 1760. He was a farmer, and several years constable. lie 
died 1782-3. His will was proved March -1, 178J). In it he gave 
his wife Silence kt as the law directs," and to daughter Mary Hunt's 
three children (their mother being dead) twenty shillings each, to 
be delivered to their grandfather, Mr. Enoch Hunt, to be put to in- 
terest until they came of age; to Caleb Hunt twenty shillings; to 
Sarah Thomas ten acres of land, and the remainder to son John, 
who was executor. The widow died in South Weymouth 1799. 
Children.' all born in Braintree: 

i. John, 8 born 10 June, 1751. Lived on the old homestead. He mar- 
ried 4 Dec. 1774 Lydia, daughter of Deacon Nathaniel and Tamar 
(White) Bayley of South Weymouth, and granddaughter of Rev. 
James Bayley, the first minister there. John 3 Thomas sold his 
homestead in Braintree to John Ilollis in 1781 for £000, and 
moved to South Weymouth. lie was admitted to the church 
then' in 1800 from the church in Braintree. lie died 10 July, 1834, 

aged 81 ; the widow died 23, 1838, aged 83. They had many 

children. Their grandson Col. .John W. 6 Thomas was for many 
years Sheriff of Norfolk County, and their great grandson Henry 
A. 6 Thomas is now Brivate Secretary to Gov. (ireenhalge. 



1805.] Portraits in JVew Hampshire of Public Men. 177 

ii. Many, born 21 Sept. 1753. She married Caleb Hunt of East Brain- 
tree 1 April, 177(5. lie was born 8 March, 1749. She probably died 
in 1781. They had three children. 

1. Hannah 4 Hunt, born 9 Jan. 1777; married Major Amos Stetson 

of Braintree 1800. He was born 1777. lie was a notable 
citizen. She died Jan. 28, 1834. He died May 8, 1859. They 
had live children : Caleb Stetson, born Jan. 1801 ; Amos W. 
Stetson, born 27 April, 1802 ; James A. Stetson, physician of 
Quincy, born 180G ; Mary Stetson, born 27 March, 1801 ; married 
Joseph Porter of Milton, Mass., 22 Oct. 1823, afterward of 
■ Lowell, and Burlington, Maine, and parents of Joseph W. 
Porter, the writer of this article, born 27 July, 1824; Khoda W. 
Stetson, born 4808, died; RhodaW. Stetson, 'born 21 Oct. 1812, 
now living at East Braintree. 

2. Enoch* Hunt, born 27 Sept. 1778; for many years an officer in 

the Massachusetts State Prison at Charlestown. 

3. Caleb* Hunt, born 1781. Lived in Braintree and died there. He 

had two wives and fourteen children, 
iii. Sarah, 3 born 12 May, 1775 ; died unmarried 28 July, 1828. 



PORTRAITS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE OF PUBLIC MEN 
AND OTHERS. 

[Communicated by the Hon. Benjamin F. Prescott, of Epping, N. H. 

[In the October Register of 1874, page 442; April 1880, p. 
181 ; July 1883, p. 150, and in January 1889, p. 44, appear lists 
of portraits in New Hampshire that have been secured through 
the personal solicitation and efforts of Ex-Gov. Benjamin F. Pres- 
cott. By far the largest number are in the State House in Con- 
cord, Dartmouth College in Hanover, and Phillips Academy at 
Exeter, besides other places. The number is now large and full of 
interest, being nearly if not quite 270. They are all in galleries 
where they can be seen by the public. We are furnished by Gov. 
Prescott with an additional list, which we publish in this number 
of the Register. It gives an account of and locates some very 
interesting and valuable paintings, and shows what can be accom- 
plished by the well-directed efforts of one person who is interested in 
securing the likenesses of men who have been prominent in public 
life, and who have been connected with the literary institutions of 
the State. We hope the work done in New Hampshire will be 
entered upon in other States. — Editor.] 

Dartmouth College. 

Hon. Salmon P. Chask, LL.D., Class of 1826. Senator in Congress 
from and Governor of Ohio, Secretary of ^he United States Treasury, Chief 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Presented by George 
S. Edgell of New York city, ("lass of 1870. A copy of an original painting 
in the Treasury Department in Washington, 1). C. 

Rev. William Cogswell, D.D., Class of 1811, Professor in Dart- 
mouth, President of Gilmanton, N. IL, Theological Seminary. An original 
vol. xlix. 16 









' 












■ 

! 












178 Portraits in New Hampshire of Public Men. [April, 

painting by Ulysses D. Tenney. Presented by George Cogswell, M.D., of 
Bradford, Mass., a brother. 

Hon. Amos Kendall, LL.D., Class of 1811, Journalist and Philan- 
thropist. A prominent figure during the administration of Andrew Jackson. 
An oil portrait! presented by his daughter, Mrs. J. Kendall Stickney, of 
Washington, D. C. 

Hon. Edward Spalding, LL.D., Class of 1833. A life size crayon. 
Presented by himself. Mr. Spalding has been a liberal supporter of the 
College, and for more than twenty-five years was a prominent trustee. 

Hon. MWllen Chamberlain, LL.D., Class of 1844. A life size crayon 
by Burdock. Presented by himself. Mr. Chamberlain has been a liberal 
benefactor to the College. He has held high and responsible positions in 
the State government of Massachusetts and the city of Boston. 

Hon. Edward F. Noves, LL.D., Class of 1857. An oil portrait two- 
thirds length by G. P. A. Mealy. Presented by his wife, of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. Mr. Noyes was a General in the late war, Governor of Ohio and 
United States Minister to France. 

Rev. Joseph Barlow Felt, LL.D., Class of 1813. An oil portrait, 
by Edgar Parker. Presented by his kinsman, Hon. Joseph B. F. Osgood 
of Salem, Mass. It represents Dr. Felt at the age of 69. Dr. Felt was 
a distinguished antiquarian and historical writer. 

Hon. Mills Olcott, Class of 1790. Presented by the widow of the late 
Prof. Samuel G. Brown, D.I). Mr. Olcott was Treasurer and Trustee of 
the College. His daughters married the lions. Joseph Bell, Rufus Choate 
and William II. Duncan, all graduates of Dartmouth. 

Prof. Oliver Payson Hubbard, LL.D. Portrait painted by U. D. 
Tenney. Presented to the College by the class of 1856. Prof. Hubbard 
is still living in New York city, lie is a graduate of Yale in 1828. Dr. 
Hubbard was for many years Professor of Chemistry in Dartmouth, is now 
Professor emeritus, and one of the overseers of the Thayer School of 
Engineering;. 

Hon. Samuel Fessenden, LL.D., Class of 1806. Presented by his 
son, Dr. Charles S. D. Fessenden of Louisville, Ky. Mr. Fessenden was 
a prominent, lawyer in Maine for many years. Three of his sons graduated 
from Dartmouth and four from Bowdoin. Hon. Wm. Pitt Fessenden was 
his son. 

Hon. Ichabod Bartlett, Class o? 1808. Presented by his nephew 
James W. Bartlett of Dover, N. II. Mr. Bartlett was one of the ablest 
lawyers in New Hampshire; was Speaker of the New Hampshire House of 
Representatives and a representative in Congress from 1823 to 1829. 

Rev. Zedakiah S. Barstow, D.I). Presented by his son Josiah Whit- 
ney Barstow, M.D., of Flushing, New York. Dr. Barstow was a Trustee 
of the College from 1831 to 1871. 

Hon. Peter Olcott and wife. These portraits were presented by Mrs. 
Sarah Olcott Brinley of Newport, R. I., a granddaughter. Mr. Olcott was 
a Trustee from 1788 to 1808, and was the father of the Hon. Mills Olcott. 
He held many important positions in Vermont. 

Hon. William II. Duncan, Class of 1830. Presented by Miss Mildred 
Crosby of Hanover. Mr. Duncan was an able lawyer. He was well 
known to the Dartmouth Alumni for many years. 



1895.] Portraits in New Hampshire of Public Men. 179 

Rev. Josiaii Gardner Davis, D.D. Presented by his daughter and 
her husband, Dr. George A. Spalding, of New York city. Dr. Davis was 
a graduate from Yale in I806. lie was a Trustee of Dartmouth from 
1871 to 1891. 

Gen. Wiieelock Graves Veazey, LL.D., Class of 1850. An oil 
portrait by U. 1). Tenney. Presented by himself. Gen. Veazey was a 
prominent soldier and officer from Vermont in the late war; also an Asso- 
ciate Justice of the Supreme Court of that State, and now a member of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Edward C. Carkigan, Class of 1877. This portrait was painted by 
Mr. Mills of De Pauw University, Indiana, and presented by II. W. 
Knight, Esq., of New York city, a half brother of Mr. Carrigan. Mr. 
Carrigan was an active alumnus, and took a lively interest in the College, 
but died soon after he entered upon his profession as a lawyer. 

Phillips (Exeter) Academy. 

Hon. John F. Potter, of Wisconsin. Tie was a pupil in tho Academy 
in 1832. Went to Wisconsin and commenced the practice of the law. 
Was a member of the 35th; 3(>th and 37th Congresses, and United States 
Consul General to Canada during the administration of President Lincoln. 
An original by U. D. Tenney. Presented by himself. 

Hon. Alpiieus Felch, LL.D., of Ann Arbor, Michigan. A pupil in 
1821. When young moved to Michigan. Held many and important 
State offices. Became Governor of and United' States Senator from the 
State. Has been prominently connected with the State University. 

An original portrait by Ralph Morgan of Ypsilanti, Michigan. Presented 
by himself. 

The portrait of Joseph G. IIoyt, LL.D., now in tho Academy, has been 
copied by U. D. Tenney, and presented to the Washington University, St. 
Louis, Mo., by his son, who was Chancellor of that institution at the time 
of his death. 

In State House at Concord. 

Hon. James Bell. United States Senator, prominent lawyer and 
statesman. Oil portrait by J. Harvey Young. Presented to State by his 
children. 

Hon. Edward H. Rollins. Speaker New Hampshire House of 
Representatives, Representative in Congress for six years, United States 
Senator. An original by Daniel J. Strain. Presented to State by his 
children. 

lion. William E. Chandler. Speaker New Hampshire House of 
Representatives, Solicitor of the United States Navy, Assistant Secretary 
of the United States Treasury, Secretary of the Navy. United States 
Senator. A copy of the portrait in the Navy Department, Washington, 
D. C, by Ulysses D. Tenney. Presented to State by himself. 

Hon. Jacob H. Ela. United S:ated Marshal for New Hampshire, 
Representative in Congress. Life size crayon. Presented to State by his 
widow, Mrs. Mary II. Ela. 

Hon. Auneii Gkkenlkae. President New Hampshire State Senate, 
Editor, etc. Oil portrait. Presented to tho State by his children. 

Hon. Albe Cady. Secretary of State from 1814 to 181 G. Presented 
to the State by his granddaughter. 



180 Correction in the Cotton Pedigree. [April, 

Capt. James S. Thornton, of the United States Navy. A great grand- 
son of lion. Matthew Thornton, signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Capt. Thornton was executive officer of the United States gunboat Kear- 
saye, when she sank the rebel pirate Alabama, and was very active in the 
engagement. An original by U. D. Tenney. Presented to the State by 
his widow, Mrs. Ellen W. Thorntou. 

Gen. John Stark. The original was painted by Miss Hannah Crown- 
inshield, when the General was 82 years old. This is the only correct 
likeness of him extant. Hon. George C. Gilrnore of Manchester, N. H M 
and Wm. C. Todd of Atkinson, N. II., aided much in the finding of and 
securing this portrait. It was paid for by the State. Painted and enlarged 
by U. D. Tenney. 

lion. Arthur Livkrmore, son of Hon. Samuel, was Justice of the 
Superior Court of New Hampshire from 1799 to 1809. He was also an 
Associate Justice of the Supreme Court from 1813 to 181 G. Presented 
to the State by his son, Hon. Arthur Livermore, late United States Consul 
at Londonderry, Ireland. 

N. II. Agricultural College. 

Kx-Gov. Kkki> isuiuiv Smyth. This portrait is two-thirds length; was 
painted by U. I). Tenney, and presented to the College by Gov. Smyth, 
who has been Trustee and Treasurer since its establishment. 

A large number are promised for the State, and the institutions in it 
above named. 



A NEEDED CORRECTION IN THE PEDIGREE OF THE 
COTTON FAMILY AS GiVEN BY MR. SAVAGE, 
MR. SIBLEY AND SOME OTHERS.* 

By Ilr.NitY Williams, A.Br, of Boston, Mans. 

In Mr. Siivagc/a Genealogical Dictionary of New England, vol. 
1 , p. 1(5 1, we read : 

Elizabeth [Cotton] m. Rev. William Williams of Hatfield, as was once 
said, but erroneously, for she m. Rev. James Ailing of Salisbury and his 
successor, Rev. Caleb Cashing. 

In vol. 4, p. 560, in giving the sons of Isaac son of Robert 
Williams, the first of the line, who came to this country in 1G37 
and settled at Roxbury, Mass. : 

William b. 2 February 1665:, II. C. 1683, minister of Hatfield, ancestor 
of a long line of distinguished clergymen. 

Mr. Sibley, in his " Harvard Graduates," vol. 3, p. 264, says : 

In regard to Williams's family there is much obscurity and uncertainty. 
The statement often made, that Williams's first wife was Elizabeth, born 
IS August, 1665, who died 7 August, 1 698, daughter of the Reverend 
Seaborn Cotton, II. U. 1651', cannot be true; for in 1688 this Elizabeth 

* This article was accidentally omitted in the January number. 



r 



1895.] Correction in the Cotton Pedigree. 181 

married the Reverend James Ailing, who died 3 March, 1095; and 14 
March, 1 697, she married the Reverend Caleb Sbshlng, II. U. 1092, Al- 
ling's successor. 

Here are two very positive statements, and other writers of less 
note have followed Savage and Sibley. 

In a volume entitled "The Genealogy and History of the Family 
of Williams in America," published in 1847, page 159, it is stated 
that 

The Rev. William Williams of Hatfield, second son of Isaac Williams, 
of the second generation, was born Feb. 2, 1GG5, was graduated at Harvard 
College in 1683, and settled at Hatfield, Mass., as a minister of the gospel, 
in the year 1685. He married for his first wife, soon after his settlement, 
a daughter of the Rev. Dr. Cotton, &c. 

This book, written by a country physician, Dr. Stephen West 
Williams of Dcerfield, Mass., in the leisure moments snatched from 
the time engrossed by a large professional practice, deserves especial 
commendation. Dr. Williams was one of the pioneers in this kind 
of enquiry now become so common, and though his work, as might 
be expected, is not wholly free from errors, and though others since 
have improved upon his methods, a tribute of gratitude is due to 
his memory from all his kindred, for his patient, painstaking and 
disinterested service in their behalf. Dr. Williams was elected a 
corresponding member of this Society Jan. 6, 1846, and died July 9, 
1855. (See extracts from an autobiography of Dr. Williams in 
Vol. 2, Memorial Biographies, N. E. Hist. Gen. Society, p. o89, 
contributed by his daughter, Mrs. Helen Maria Huntington.) Dr. 
Williams's grandmother, Esther, was granddaughter of Elizabeth 
Cotton, and it might have been taken for granted that her father, 
the Rev. William Williams of Weston, a graduate of Harvard Col- 
lege in 1705, well knew his mother's maiden name. 

In " Sprague's Annals of the American Pulpit," published ten 
years after Dr. Williams's book, we find it again stated that Wil- 
liam Williams of .Hatfield married Eliza[beth], daughter of the 
Rev. Seaborn Cotton, of Hampton, New Hampshire. It will be 
seen that both these publications preceded the volumes of Mr. Sav- 
age (1861-1862), and Mr. Sibley's in 1885. 

In the first volume of the New-England Historical and Genealo- 
gical RtiGTSTEli (1817), in Mr. J. YVingate Thornton's pedigree 
of the Cotton family, the marriage of William Williams of Hatfield 
to Elizabeth Cotton, daughter of Seaborn, is again stated. Also, 
in a pedigree of the Cotton family, compiled principally from the 
foregoing in the Register and a manuscript of the late Rosseter 
Cotton of Plymouth, in the possession of William G. Brooks, Esq., 
and Mr. Jackson's History of Newton, which was published in Mr. 
Drake's folio edition of the History of Boston, in 1857 (sixteen 
years before Mr. Sibley published his first volume of Harvard Grad- 
uates), we learn- that John Cotton's first child, Seaborn (born on 
vol. xlix. 16* / 












. 






182 Correction in the Cotton Pedigree, [April, 

board the ship Griffin, in which John Cotton came to New England, 
"Marigena" in the old H. C. Catalogue), married Dorothy Brad- 
street, and had a daughter Elizabeth, born Aug. 13, 1665, who 
married William Williams of Hatfield. Again, that John Cotton's 
fifth child was John, whose daughter Elizabeth married the 
Rev. James Ailing of Salisbury, and afterwards the Rev. Caleb 
Cushing, his successor. Hence it is evident that there were two 
Elizabeths, cousins, both of whom married clergymen. But we 
need not stop here in settling conclusively and once for all this dis- 
puted genealogical point. 

Seaborn Cotton was minister at Hampton, N. H. for many years, 
and was succeeded by his son John. Seaborn kept a Journal or 
Church Record which at his death was continued by his son, and 
afterwards by his successor, the Rev. Nathaniel Gookin. A copy 
of this Journal was presented to the Genealogical Society some 
years since by the late Dr. John S. H. Fogg, and more recently 
from the same source, the original has come into the Society's pos- 
session. This last is a precious relic, though time-worn and some- 
what dilapidated ; for here we have in Seaborn's own handwriting 
many an interesting record. As, on one page, this : 

I was married by iny Father Mr. Simon Bradstreet to his eldest daugh- 
ter Dorothy, June 14. 1654. 

And in his son John's handwriting : 

My honored Grandfather Bradstreet died March 28 th , 1697, in ye 04 th 
year of his age, and was buried at Salem April 2. '97. 

And this : 

My sister Elizabeth Williams, died, 1698 and icas buried at Hatfield. 

In final evidence, the stone erected to the memory of Elizabeth 
Williams may still be seen and deciphered in the old Hatfield bury- 
ing-ground. 

Jonathan Edwards preached the funeral sermon of William Wil- 
liams of Hatfield, in which, as quoted by Mr. Sibley, he uses these 
words : 

He was a person of uncommon natural abilities and distinguished learn- 
ing, a great Divine, of very comprehensive knowledge, and of a solid ac- 
curate Judgment. 

The writer of this article has seen his common-place book, a 
quarto volume bound with clasps, the entries in which are mostly 
in Latin. 

From the facts above stated it may be seen that the Williamses 
who can claim descent from this "Divine," so distinguished in his 
day and generation, and from his first wife Elizabeth Cotton,. can 
also (race their lineage back to the Rev. John Cotton, to Governor 
Simon Bradstreet and his wile Anne Dudley ("The Tenth Muse"), 
daughter of Governor Thomas Dudley by his first wife. 



I- 



1895.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrook and others. 183 



LETTERS OF COL. THOMAS WESTBROOK 
AND OTHERS, 

RELATIVE TO INDIAN AFFAIRS IN MAINE. 



Communicated by William Blake Trask, A.M., of Dorchester, Masa. 
[Concluded from vol. xlviii., page 441.] 
Muster Roll of Capt. Richard Bourne and Company, from May 12th to 



July 14 th 1725. Examin'd Novem 1 
Jeremiah Allen Esq r Treasu r . 

Richard Bourne Cap 1 

Solomon Baten Lieu 1 

Jer a Howse Lieu 1 

Robert Stanford Ens" 

Thomas Will Serf 

Serv 1 To Cap* John Davis 
John Oliver Serj 1 

Serv 1 To Cap 4 Bourne 
Josiah Peter Serf 

Serv* to John Otla Jun r 
John Poekonnct Serj 1 

Serv 1 to Cap' Bourne 
Thomas Ned Corp 11 

Serv 1 To John Baxter 
Benj' 1 Sennuitt Do 

Serv* To John Goreham 
Joseph Ralph Do 

Serv 1 To Jon a Lewis 
Thorn 8 Tarrah Do 

Serv 1 To Coll. Bourne 
Joseph Woues Cent 1 

Serv 1 to Jo 8 Holloway 
Job Marsh 
Isaac Tomshit 

Serv 1 to John Goreham 
Joseph Capee 

Serv 1 to EbenF Hinckley 
Nehem th Notwamuck 

Serv 1 To Benj a Nye 
Joseph Wicket 
Joshua Wicket 

Serv 1 To Isaac Hinckly 
Joseph Crooch 

Serv 1 To Tho 8 Hallett 
Robin Fuller 

Serv 1 To Benj a Crocker 
Sam 1 Oliver 

Serv 1 To John Chipman Jun r 
Amos Quason 



15 th 1725, p r Jno. Wheelwright, for 

Sam 11 Tray 

Serv 1 To Tho 8 Nye 
Amos Allmiquit 
John Peter 

Serv 1 To Jo 8 Sturges 
John Allmiquit 

Serv 1 To Jer a Howes 
Paul Manasses 

Serv 1 To Paul Sears 
John Ellimes 
Peter Dogamus 

Serv 1 To Paul Sears 
David Quason 
John Seirniquit 

Serv 1 To Will™ Hedge 
Edw' 1 John Wampetuck 

Serv 1 To Cap 1 John Otis 
Joseph Takenesh 
Mosses James 

Serv 1 To Coll° Otis 
John Peetrius[?] 
Aaron Chin 
Jam 8 Queach 

Serv 1 To John Otis Jun r 
Jere a Couly alias Ned 

Serv 1 To Lott Gray 
Joseph Twiney 

Serv 1 To Tho 8 Clark Jun r 
Joel Daniel 

Serv 1 To Sam* Sturge Esq 
Sam 1 Harry 

Serv 1 To Coll John Otis 
Josiah Popnumuck 

Serv 1 To Benj a Crocker 
• Elisha Peter 
John Quoy 

Serv 1 To Benj n Bourne 
,Shubel Harry 

Serv 1 To Coll" Otis 






. 












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184 Letters of Col. Thomas Weslbrook and others. [April, 



Benj a Soloman 

Serv 1 To Capt Willis 
Sam 1 Wicket 
John Williams 
8am 1 Hunter 

Ser 1 to Lemuel Pope 
Jacob Squam 
Peter Newasoonuck 

Scrv 1 To Ja 8 Barker 
Stephen Wampis 

Serv 1 To John West 
John Commoscon 
Benj a Wanno 

Ser 1 To Capt Willes 
Abel Obediah 
Isaac Mo it 

Ser 1 to Capt Wills 
Elisha Elisha 
Ser 1 To Do 
Abraham Jones 

Ser 1 To Jer a Howes 
Joseph Quason 

Ser 1 To Jo 8 Sturges 
Isaac Phillips 
Henry Passuit 
James Russell 
George Sachamis 

Ser 1 To Josiah Dote 
Jacob Keto 
John Kossen 

Ser* to Maj r Gorcham 
Josiah Crooch 
Sort To Do 
Abel Blinks 

Sei-t To Shubal Baxter 
Samuel Keephegin 

Ser' To Josiah Barse 
Tom Daniel 
Simon Abraham 

Ser 1 To ]\laj r Gorcham 
Eben 1 ' Cosens 
Abel Tom 

Ser 1 To Maj r Goreham 

Mass. Arch. 91: 139-141. 



to Aug. 4, 1725. 

James Grant Cap 4 
Arthur Bragdon Lieut. 
Joseph Smith Sargt. 
Samuel Gitcholl Do. 
John Goodwin Do. 



John Allimon 

Ser 1 To Is 1 Done Esq r 
Josliua Tripp 
George George 
Cen 11 Ser 1 To Sain 1 Niles 

Sam 1 Quoy 
Nehemiah Cowet 
John Tripps 

Ser 1 To Jo s Done Esq 
Dan 1 Cossens 
Ser 1 To Do 
John Papeus 
Tho 8 Chamuck 

Ser 1 To John Davis 
Isaac Hassaway 
Nath 1 Beachgrass 

Serv* To ]Maj r Goreham 
George Gedidiah 

Serv 1 To Do 
Elisha Schamus 

Ser 1 To Coll Jn° Otis 
John Comsett 

Ser 1 To Tho 8 Jenkins 
Joshua Wood 

Ser 1 To David Barker 
David Jobb 

Serv 1 To Jer a Dellingham 
Aron Numick 

Serv 1 To John Otis 
Mosses Peig 

Serv 1 To Coll Bourne 
Amos Shanks 

Ser 1 To Coll Otis 
Tho 8 Hanueway 

Ser 1 To Tho 8 Adams 
Jo 8 Pockonnet 

Ser 1 To Silas Bourne 
Eliak 1 " Quacom 
Peter Job 

Ser 1 To John Otis 
Jacob Paule 

Ser* To Theo us Chushing 
Thomas Peter 

Ser 1 To Shub 1 Howland 



Dan 1 Smith 
Hugh Ross 
Samuel Shaw 



Corp 



aes Gran! 


j & Company Voluntiers Ir 


Dm June 2 


Berw k 


John Conner Cen 1 


Berwick 


York 


Jn° Mason " 


Kittery 


Do 


Michael Coffin Corp 1 


York 


Berwick 


Joseph Emery Cent. 


Berwick 


'» 


James Abbot " 


t( 


York 


Daniel Libby " 


u 


Berwick 


Daniel Stone " 


u 


York 


Rich d Earle " 


a 



. 
























' 









' 






. 












1895.] Letters of (JoL Thomas Westbroolc and others, 185 



Joseph Astin 


Cent. 


York 


Joseph Main 


a 


<( 


Job Young 


u 


u 


Samuel Hale 


« 


a 


James Oliver 


It 


a 


Caleb Young 


<l 


a 


lehabod Cuzins 


a 


Wells 


Eben 1 ' Wittom 


a 


Ivittery 


Joseph Bracey 


a 


York 


Jedediah Probblo " 


u 


Moses Butler 


Clerk 


Berwick 



Jn° Warren Cent. Berwick 

Thomas Holmes " " 

William Black « 

Tho 8 Emery " " 

Job Jennings " " 

John Hern " " 

Aquiller Hale " York 

Tim Iliggins " " 

Jer y Moid ton " « 

Tho 8 Bragdon " . " 

Joseph Linscott " u 

Mass. Arch. 91: 144, 145. 

[In a later Roll of Capt James Grant and Company from Sept 20 th to 
Oct 9 th 1725, the foregoing names are included with the following additional 
ones, namely, James Chadburn, Ens. Kittery; Centinels, James Goodwin, 
Thomas Gubtill, Gabriel Hambleton, Benj a Bragdon, Moses Spencer, all 
of Berwick; Alexand 1 ' Ferguson, Zechariah Emery, George Mills, Nath 1 
Barns, Joseph Gowen, John Frey, all of Kittery; Joseph Plaisted and 
Joseph Rankin, of York; Peter Rich, of Wells. Mass. Arch. 91: 154- 
15G. In Capt Grant's Company of Voluntiers from October 13 th to Nov. 
14, 1725, there are in addition to many of the above the following names, 
Henry Dresser, Will m Grant, Nath 1 Barns, Joseph Gowen, Johri Frey, 
Moses Spencer, Solomon Thomas. Mass. Arch. 91: 201, 203.] 



Muster Roll of the Sloop Sea Flower, Capt Simon Slocom Comander; 
a Transport in his Maj ties Service Eastward. 

Simon Slocum Master & Pilot Zachariah Cobourn Seaman 
William Boreman Mate Samuel More Ditto 

William Burns Mate John Church Ditto 

The Sloop about 60 Tonus w Ul 4 Guns. 

Mass. Arch. 91: 146. 



A Muster Roll of the Company in His Majesty's Service under the 
Command of AVilliam Cannada [Canedy] Captain. 



Will 10 Cannada 
Benj !l Wright 
Rolort Stanford 
Jo s Burden 
Jo s Studson 
Josiah Meeds 

Serv' To Cap 1 Canada 
Benj 11 Durfey 
Rich' 1 Pomroy 
Ja 8 Bragdon 

Ser 1 To Lit Wright 
John Oliver 

Do To Cap 1 Bourne 
John Attamon 

Do to Jo" Done Esq 
Tho 8 Tarror 

Do To Coll 11 Bourne 



Cap 1 
Lieu' 
En 8 
Seif 



Corp 11 



Run 



Cont 11 



Dan 1 Cussens 

Do To Esq Done 
Josh 11 Tripp 

Do To Do Done 
Bonj u Soloman 

Do To Capt Willis 
Joel Daniel 

Do To Sam 1 Sturgcs Esq 
John Peehue 

Lost a Pro. Gun 
John Pepeeus 
Abr a Jones 

Ser 1 So Jcr" House 
Jo 8 Worde ? 

Do To Jo 8 Holloway 
Nehem 11 Natwamuch 

Do To Benj* Nyo 
Abel Obecliah 






. 



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186 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbroolc and others. [April, 



James Queich 

Do To John Otis Jun r 
Simon Trenumetuch 

Do To Maj r Gorcham 
Tho 8 Daniel 

Lost a Pro. Gun 
Able Tom 
Isaac Hassaway 
Eben r Cuseus 

Lost a Pro. Gun 
Job Mark 
Sam 11 Oliver Run 

Ser* To Chipman Jun r 
John Quoy Run 

Do To Benj u Bourne 
Henry Pesuit Do 

Josiah Crook Do 

Do To Maj r Goreham 
Isaac Phillips Do 

Elislia Sachem Do 

Do To Coll Otis 
Peter Washauks Do 

Do To Ja s Barker 
Joshua Hood Do 

Do To Do Barker 
Sam 1 Capehicks Gen 11 Run 

Ser' To Jon a Pence 
Mass. Arch. 91 : 178-180. 



Ned John Do 

Josiah Popnemonoch 

Do To Bcnj a Crocker 
Eliak 1 " Quacom 
Amos Shanks 

Do To Coll Otis 
Josh a Wicket Run 

Do To Isaac Hinckley 
David Job 

Do To Jer a Dellingliam 
Jacob Paul 

Do To Theophilus Cushin 
John Comshite 

Do To T Jenkins 
Moses Peig 

Do To Coll Bourne 
Tom Wills Run 

Lost Pro. Gun 

Do To Cap 1 John Davis Run 

Abel Blinks 

Do To Shubel Baxter Run 

Peter Doganius Run 

Do To Paul Sears 
John Boson ? Run 

Do To Maj r Goreham 
Robon Jere;iy 

Do To Benj a Crooker 



Muster Roll of Capt. John Gyles from June 10, to Nov. 3, 1725. 



John Gyles Capt 
Sam 11 Eaton Lieut 
Moses Harper Clerk 
Rowland Norten Drum r 
Sam 1 Tompson Sent 1 
Robert Lithgo 
John Stanwood 
John Cochron 
Mass. Arch. 91: 185, 186. 



Sam 1 Staples 

Simon Pender Serv' to John Gamage 

Tho 8 Eaton 

Joseph Flood 

Luke Wells 

Sam 1 Tompson 

Joseph Cross 

Mosses Cenney 



Muster Roll of Capt 
June lG ,h to NovenV 9 th 
Josepli Heath Capt. 
Jacob Clark Lieut 
Jabez Bradbury Ensigne 
Sam 1 Harnden Sarg* 
Simon Holdin Sarg 1 
John Pumry Corp 11 
Thomas Pol ley " 
John Pyke " 

And 1 ' Macfaden Sen 1 
Joseph Skill ings " 
Peter Ayers " 



Joseph Heath & Company, at 
1725. 

Koxbury James Coller Sen 1 
Topsfield George Harris " 
Salisbury James Simpson " 
Redin John Bayley " 

Cambridge Peter Charles " 
Piscataqua Serv L to m r An 

Boston Larance Bond " 

Rob 1 Willson 
Sam 11 Powers " 
Kittery Thomas Pym " 
Milton Moses May " 



Richmond, from 

Chelmsford 

Concord 

Nantucket 

Boston 

Barnstable 



ibal 



Mistick 

Boston 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Philadelphia 





. 










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* 




















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. 





































■ 












1895.] Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. 187 



James Gardner Sen 1 
Uriah Gates " 
William Amos " 
John Folley 
William Cochran " 
Henry Sanders Corp 11 & 
John Quonnum Sen 1 
James Smith " 
Edward Goodwin " 
Aaron Copp " 
John Burges " 
John Douce " 

Mass. Arch. 91 : 187- 



Hingham 
Boston 



Brunswick 

Drumer 

Dartmouth 

Salisbury 

Almsbury 

Haverhill 

Kittery 

Ipswich 

189. 



Thomas Nason Sen 1 
Edward Chapman" 
Rich' 1 Tucker " 
Sam 11 Burrel " 

Jacob Hunt " 

David Sergent " 
ThomasMacfaden" 
Peter Ileeal " 
James Macbride " 
James Burdeen " 
Francis Procter " 
James Cochran " 



Boxford 

Ipswich 

Almsbury 

Boston 

Haverhill 

Lynn 

Kittery 

Boston 

Brunswick 



Muster Roll of Cap* Sam 1 Jou 


rden and Company, June 18 th to Nc 


1725. 








Sam u 1 Jourden 


Capt 






John March 


Lieu 4 




John Bagshaw 


Nath 1 Jourden 


Do. Seif 


'pay 


Israel Sabin 


Arthur Noble 


Ens n 




Will 111 Bermingham 


David Bryant 


Seif 




Charles Cammell 


Edm' 1 Mory 






Jacob Kee 


Hugh March 


Corp 1 




John Reed 


Trueman Powel 


«( 




Leonard Delinet Serv 1, to 


Will 1 " Russell 


Sen 11 




N. Tarbox 


Will'" Wright 






John Falkner 


Josh a Hooper 






Joseph Convers 


Samuel Cole 






Edw' 1 Procter 


John Runnalds 






John Frost 


James Inch 






Judah Young 


Will" 1 Browne 






Will 111 Dyer 


Tho 8 Jones 






John Brian t 


Joseph Perram 






Henry Pendexter 


Rich 11 Clark 






Nehemiah Pitman 


Nathan 1 Davis 






Francis Proctor 


Mass. Arch. 91: 197, 198. 







Muster Roll of the Sloop George, Cap 1 David Franklin Comander, a 
Transport in His Maj tys Service Eastward. 

Capt David Franklin Mast r & Pilot Peter Perry Seaman 

Joel Smith Mate John Gravel " 

Anthony Baker Seaman John Mcfedris " 

The Sloop about 60 Tonus w th 4 Gunns. 

Mass. Arch. 91 : 109, 200. Nov. 15 th 1725. 



Muster 
25 


Roll of G 


tpt John 


John 
John 
Is" P 


Penhallow 

Morrison 

ratt 


Capt. 

Ens 

W 



Penhallow from June 8th to Novem. 15 th 



Sam 1 Love 
Dan 1 Mackentire 
Rich' 1 Walford 



Corp 1 

Do 

Sent 1 









I 

























. ■ 








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188 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbroolc and others. [April,* 



Michael Micom 
Colum : S mi tli 
John Wood 
Urian Angier 
John Mcfadres 
Tim Swan 
John Mullen 
Seth Toby 
James Mattocks 



Sent 1 



Tho 8 Motherwell 
W m Johnson 
Israel Sheldon 
James Morrison 
And w Finlow 
Morgan Miles 
Peter Harden 
Edw d Painter 
Nehem h Robertson 



Sent 1 



Morgan Miles from May 12 th 1724 to Aug 1 18 th 1725 put in p' Approba 
of His Hon r the L fc Gov 1 ': the s d Miles be taken at Arrowsick & Carr d away 
p' y e Indians to Canada, who made his Escape from them & Returned to 
His Post. 

Mass. Arch. 91: 204, 205. 

[Six of Capt. Penhallow's men in the Roll of 1722, three years before, 
were still with him, namely, Mackentire, Walford, Smith, Wood, Angier 
and Motherwell.] 



Muster Roll of Cap 1 Sam 1 Wheelwright & Co. from June 2 d to Novem r 
16 th 1725. Examin'd Novem r 20 th 1725. 



Sam 1 Wheelwright Cap* 
Na u : Wheelwright Ens 



Noah Davis 
Joseph Day 
James Burnam 
David Stikney 
Philip Iloyt 
James Medoll 
James Lagget 
Ich° Dunam 



Sarg* 
Do 

Clerk 

Cer 11 

Do 

Sne 11 



Wells 

Do 
Harvill 
Wells 

Do 
Newbry 
Amsbrey 
Wells 
Plimtoun 

Do 
Ostrriver 

Do 
Boxfort 
We nam 
Capean 



Will : Hartwell 
Philip Brown 
Je r : Hopkissorv 
John Whitten 
Moses Donner 
John Manning 
Sam 1 Boathby 
Will James 
Will: Laraby 
Philip Durrell 
John Eavens 
Jacob Hamblen 
John Stuardifort 
Josiah Keen 
John Baker 



John Burks 

Will. Duly 

Benj : Smith 

Isreall Triker 

Will: Kirk 

Jon a : Wattson Amsbrey John Macdauiell 

Mass. Arch. 91: 209, 210. 

[Thirteen of the above thirty-two names appear in the Muster Roll of 
Capt Samuel Wheelwright & Company from October 23 d to June 2 d 1724, 
as printed in the Register, xlviii., page 283.] 



Concord 

Charlstown 

Rowly 

Bar wick 

Salsbrey 

Cambrig 

Wells 

Brigwater 

Wells 

Do 
Dogister 
Bastible 
Plimouth 
Seateate 
Boston 
Milton 



Dismist 
Do 
Do 
Do 
Do 



Command of Allason Brown, Return Nov. 26, 1725. 



Allason Brown 
Tho 8 Perkins 
George March 
Joseph Averill 
John Murphy 
Will"' Taylor 
Nath. HenVlricks 

Will 1 " Hughs 

Tho 8 Gums 



Lieut Arnndal 

Serj 

it 

Corp 1 Ipswich 
Ilingham 

Cent 11 Loudon 
Haverhill 
Salem 
Boston 



Philip Fowler 
John Whitten 

Serv* to Jas. 
Sara 1 Morgin 
Eben r Chamborlin 
John Baxter 
Joshua Walker 
Edm d Morse 
Joshua Peirco 



Newberry 

Arundal 
March 

Arundal 

Oxford 
Charlestowne 
Piscataqua 
Dismist 
Newberry 



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. 









































1895.] Letters of Col '. Thomas We stbrooh and others. 



189 



I 



John Ilutchins Haverhill John Watson Arundal 

Lazarus Gooding Dismist Emanuel Averill Sandwich 

Sam 1 Littlefield Newberry Tho 8 Waiey Swansey 

Rich d Peirce Ipswieh Ste" Harding Pilot Arundall 

Tho s Wormwood Wells 

Person Kveleth liis Acco* for Provisions. 

Mass, Arch. 01 : 215, 21(5. 

[In the Muster Roll of Serj 1 Allison Browne & Company from Novem 
ber 1723 to June 1724, printed in Register, xlviii., page 440, the names 
of twelve of the above persons appear; those of Murphy, Taylor Hendricks, 
Hughs, Grimes, Fowler, \V bitten, Morgan, Chamberlin, Baxter, Walker 
and Whaley, but their residences are not always the same.] 



Muster Roll of Cap 1 Joshua Moodey & Co. from June 1 st : [to] Nov. 22 d 
1725. 



Joshua Moody 


Cap* 


Rice Nicholls 


Jiv° Robbens 


Leu* 


Joseph Thomas 


Joseph Lampson 


Ensign 


Eben 1 " Hall Jun r 


James Parker 


Sergent 


W ,n Kind 


Eben. Hall 


Ditto 


Mathew Ryall 


Peter Walton 


Corprill 


James Buckston 


Benj^ Ingersoll 


Ditto 


Francis Wyman 


John Ross 


Ditto 


James Ooddenham 


James McCasland 


Sentinall 


Richard Webber 


Jn° Barbetteen 


Do 


Jn° Burnett 


Eben 1- Gustin 


Do 


W" Nummockes 


David Gustin 




W 1 " Tar rah 


Thorn* Ilipton 




Josiah Lowell 


Robert Bailey 




W 1 " Stiiison 


Benj a Skillcn 




James Mcfarlin 


Zech 11 Braekett 




Jn° Malcum 


John Trott 




Rich d Pomroy 


Renond McDanold 




Nath 11 Winslow Se 


Jn° Barbour 




Ceaser Negro 


ass. Arch. 91: 219, 


220. 





Muster Roll of Cap* John Gray & Company From June 1 st to Nov. 30, 
1725. 



John Gray 


Capt 


Francis Rons 


Cent( 


Benj a Larraby 


Leut 


Dismissed 




James Woodside 


Ensign 


Nicholas Bode 


a 


Nath 11 Knight 


Sergt 


W m Fitzsimons 


it 


Dern : Jorden 


Do 


James Carter 


u 


John Getchell 


Corperell 


Richard Babson 


tt 


John Sawyer 


Do 


W m Hide 


« 


Benj a Ilorskinns 


Do 


Eben 1 ' In go Is by 


u 


Daniel Jackson 


it 


Thomas Perry 


(( 


Tho 8 Willcox 


Centen 11 


Martyn Jameson 


it 


Rich d Page 


Do 


W m Jamison 


it 


Benj a Ray 


tt 


Thomas Skelton 


a 


VOL. XLIX. 


17 







H)0 Letters of Col. Thomas Westbrooh and others. [April, 



Thomas Nash 
Benj 11 Hooper 
John Perry 
James Fly 
Rob 1 McKanny 
James Libbey 
Henry McKanny 
Sampson Plummer 
Robert Jorden 
Rob* Denoldson 
Tho s Fraizer 
Israel Mitchell 
Roger Perry 

Kill'd p' Indians 



Centen 11 Eleaser McKanny 

« Robert Maines 

» Charles Pinde 

m Tho 8 Burnett 

H Son to Jn° Burnet 

« David Denning 

u W m Woodside 

u omitted Last role 

a Robert Dening 

u Killed by Indians 

W m Earle 
Eben r Nutting 
Joseph Wait 



Centen 11 



Boston Nov r 25 th 1725 
Mass. Arch. 91: 221. 



Muster Roll of Capt. William 
Examin'd Novem 23 d 1725. 
William Canady 
Stephen Whittacker 
Daniel Elethorp 
Franciss Punchard 
Edward Bishop 
Peter Parry 
Thorn. Lawrence 
Stephen Morrells 

Serv 1 to Benj a Knowlton 
John Norris 
Benj a Speen 
John Church 
Jeremiah Belcher 
Elkanah Tofeman 
Isaac Chamberlain 
Mass. Arch. 01: 223. 



Cap 1 

En s 

Serf 

Corp 1 
<< 

Cent. 
Do 



Canady from Nov r 1724 To Nov r 1725. 

John White 
Philip Butler 
Daniel Roff" 

Serv 1 to Lieu* Wright 
John Murphy 
Josiah Meeds 

Serv 1 to Cap 1 Canady 
Daniel GriiFm Ipswich 

Serv 1 to Michael Farley? 
Thomas Dun 

Serv 1 to Cap 1 Saunders 
John Pilkinton 
William Thomas 
William Kelly 
John Church 



[In the Massachusetts Archives, vol. 52, page 452, there is a letter, 
without date, supposed to be after the 10th of August, 1736, directed to 
Col. T. Westbrook, which contains an allusion to some complaints of the 
Indians in regard to obstructions to the passage of fish near Sebago Pond. 

" His Excellency, the Govern 1 has lately rec' 1 a Letter, Dated the 23 d of 
May past, from Harrow House, in Falm , without being signed by any 
person, complaining of Insults and Threatenings &c. some of your People 
have met with from some of y e Indians, without giving any Reason there- 
for in the said Letter w cl1 inclosed a Letter from Capt Tho: Smith of the 
Truck House at Saco Falls, directed to yourself, wherein His Excell cy was 
inform'd that three Indians belonging to Ammiscogan River were at Bid- 
deford in Order to take Passage on Board a Sloop bound here, and y* their 
business was to complain that the River leading to the Sebago Ponds was 
so dam'd and Obstructed." 

The letters that follow were copied from originals in possession of a 
gentleman in Portsmouth, Now Hampshire.] 



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1895.] The Town History, 191 

[Endorsed] 
For the IIonour ,,le William Pepperell Esq. 
Kittery. 

[laiTOwhouse, in Falmouth, August 25, 1737. 
I hope we shall saw some time next month and as soon as I Can get 
any quantity 08 I will send word immediately. I Return thanks for the 
oiler of the Pipe of wine which would he very acceptable at this time hut 
dare not meddle with it until the old debt is paied. 

If my uncouth Letter carried the colour of warmth or choler in it I beg 
pardon and will be more prudent for the future. With all due regards to 
your Lady and obediense to your selfe I remain S r your most humb 
servant at Command Trio 8 Westbuook. 



Ilonour'd Sr. 

I Receiv'd your favours P r m 1 ' John Wilson, of the 9 th instant, 
and am very sorry we have not water to saw you a sloop load of boards as 
you desire, our dam not being mended at Presumpscut, which will Cost us 
the best part of 2 thousand pounds to repair and secure it besides the dam- 
age of the Saws being stopt which is the onely Reason I have not paid you 
your money, as I wrote, but as soon as the mills go I will let you have a 
sloop load of boards or the money which will suit best. 



Honor Harrowhouse, in falmouth, nov: 8, 1737. 

S lr I Receued your fauer By mistr hanscon. We haue not aney 
Water to saw (aney) bordes: it greavs me I cannot answer your order for 
bordes nor money our milles not going, a[n]d the grat charg I have been at 
this Sumer has much Reducest me at present, therefore I must begg your 
pachenes somo time longer. 

I thanck you for your kind ofer to send me aney thing I want a[n]d that 
you Were Plest to informe me that mr Waldron a[n]d familey were Well; 
not hauing furder to ad[d] I Rema[i]n sir 

your most obeden 1 serv' 
Si r Ple[a]s to glue all due regardes to at comand 

Honor. Will [i] am Pepperrell. Tno s Westhuook. 

S r Exeues the Blunder in not 
leaveing [m]ore Rume below. 



THE TOWN HISTORY. 

Communicated by Rev. Anson Titus, of Somcrville, Mass. 

A town history is becoming v municipal necessity. There has, 
within twenty-five years, developed a sentiment in this regard. 
Many towns have caught upon the sentiment and have published 
cither portions of their records, or a history of their past proceed- 
ings and social life. This is well. To preserve the spirit of earlier 
citizens, to learn their excellent ways and profit by their mistakes, 
and to note the advancements made in all local affairs, is a filial 
obligation. The preservation of worthy history is as important, at 
least, as the repairing of a highway or the erection of public buildings. 






I 






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192 The Town History. [April, 

The creation of a favorable sentiment is the initial step. With 
:ni educated sentiment the peoplo will hot he satisfied wilh a cheap 
and hastily prepared work. There have been quite enough of local 
histories with an abundance of buncombe and high-toned binding. 
The local history worthy of the name must be superb in chronicling 
the past Hie of the town. To do this there must be work and research. 
It can be no sudden or holiday affair. With a sentiment which can 
be fashioned through the columns of local papers, or local historical 
society, which will demand detail and fullness, there will be a sup- 
port, commensurate with the book. One of the excellent methods 
of proceeding is for the town to select a committee of interested 
persons, who will supervise and direct the compilation of data, and 
with power to select an editor, lay out the general plan of the work, 
and then recommend to the people an appropriation which would 
carry forward the same. The compilation and publication of the 
history should be under the care of the town's best men, and not 
under the " enterprise " of a distant publisher. 

With a history well planned there should be a systematic search 
for information. The official records must come first. This is not 
the task of a day. The records of the town, the courts, the churches, 
the archives of the state should be examined, and all the essential 
items transcribed. The chief doings of the 'town in each of its 
years, the matters requiring settlement in the courts, the better life 
of the people as expressed in the records of the churches, and the 
political life as is shown in its relation to the commonwealth, all 
have an indisputable interest to the great public. Historical books 
already published, manuscripts laid away perhaps by past towns- 
men or ministers, unknown to the present generation, in some of 
the libraries of the metropolis, correspondence of leading citizens 
stowed away in the attics of old homesteads, diaries of former 
people, ancient petty books of the business men of the town, should 
be sought out and examined, and m fact all data from every source 
should be noted. The memories of the 'oldest inhabitant' should 
be recorded and tested by the records already at hand ; traditions 
of the people should be received, but with caution. The news- 
papers, many files of which are in leading libraries, should be read 
over and items gleaned therefrom, and comparisons made with the 
already collected data. This gathering of information cannot be 
done too thoroughly. 

For the latitude of Massachusetts and the older towns of Maine 
and many communities of other New Fngland States, there is no 
richer mine of unpublished data, than in the State House at Boston. 
Here are petitions from every quarter and on every subject ; here 
arc official documents of all the affairs of the people in war and 
peace, and all the dealings with the Indians, French and the mother 
cou nt iv ; here are the land grants given for services rendered in 
the earlier defenses of the colonies; the incorporations of towns 



1895.] The Town History. 193 

and plantations, of parishes and schools ; memorials which have 
come up to the Great and General Court for the pacification of 
some local disturbance ; and claims and counter-claims upon almost 
unnumbered subjects. The town historian cannot afford to neglect 
this fountain head of information. 

A local history should be a local history. Every town has sub- 
jects in common with other towns. These do not require fullness 
of detail. This is the province of the general history. But each 
town has a separate government and social life which need be 
recorded with judicious fullness. There should be given lists of 
the town officials and representatives ; the part the town played in 
the various wars, Indian, Revolutionary and Civil, with names of 
soldiers and account of services rendered ; the business men and 
various trades carried on ; the organizations and schools, which 
have been established for the improvement of the social life and the 
education of the youth. The town minister of former days comes 
in for a generous bestowal of attention. Around him and the 

I meeting-house were woven their choicest interest. The religious 

history needs to be told, but not burdened with pious detail. The 
town history should be plentifully illustrated with landscape, ancient 
homesteads, public buildings, historic sites and portraits of prominent 
citizens. These are legitimate and their insertion should be en- 
couraged ; there should be at least two or three maps of the town, 
showing the original highways, settlements and homestead sites ; 
and also of the town at time of publication. 

A chief factor in a local history is the genealogy of its families. 
This is essential. Local life and family life are closely woven. 
The family of the earlier generation is not enough. The simple 
transcription of births, marriages and deaths is better than nothing ; 
but to have the same edited with a skilful hand and completed by 
means of family information, verified by probate and other records, 
is much better. An excellent and ihe most widely adopted method 
of arranging genealogy is that used by the Historical and Gene- 
alogical Register. 

The importance of town histories is growing more manifest. 
There is a call for them outside of those immediately interested. 
The rapidly forming libraries over the country are calling for them. 
They become as books of reference. Hence to make them service- 
able to the humble citizen and the interested stranger there must be 
an index, full and complete, of names and subjects. The writer is 
one of those " little critics who clamor for indexes." With full 
information of the community in peace and war, with detail as to 
its official and social life, with family genealogies, with maps and 
an index, the local history will be cordially supported by an appro- 
priation from the common treasury of tire people. The names, 
valor mid labor of former citizens arc essential to the better life; of 
the growing youth. 
vol. xlix. 17* 






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194 Notes on the English Garfields. [April, 



MOKE NOTES ON THE ENGLISH GARFIELDS. 

By W. P. W. Phillimokb, M.A., B.C.L., London, Eng. 

A little more than eleven years ago I compiled an aceount 
of the Garfield family in England. This appeared in the Regis- 
ter for July, 1<S83. The object of that article, to show the 
descent of the late President Garfield from his English ancestors, 
was not attained, and the problem of the precise origin of the family 
is still undetermined, though it would not he safe to say that it is 
insoluble. Since then more facts about the Garfields have come to 
light, and the readers of the Register may be glad to have them 
collected together. 

The general result tends to show that the English Garfields were 
settled in the neighborhood of Rugby on the borders of the two 
counties of Warwick and Northampton from the early part of the 
sixteenth century, and though it does not appear any now are 
dwelling in the villages with which they were then connected, yet 
the name still exists in both counties, and it seems probable, 
though it is obviously impossible to prove it, that all Garfields are 
akin to one another. It will help to show how very localized the 
family was if we give a sketch diagram to indicate their principal 
early habitats, which all were within a range of a few miles : 





WAltt 


VICKSIIlliE. 


NORTH AT 


Church 






4- Cold 


Law ford. 




Clifton on 


Ashby 


+ 




Rugby. -f- Dunsmore. 

+ 


+ Kilsby. 


Bilton. + 




-f- Hill Morton. 


+ Ashby 
Ledger. 



The early Garfields appear to have held no higher rank than 
that of small yeomen and husbandmen, while some were of even 
humbler degree. In this respect the probable English ancestry of 
President Garfield forms an obvious contrast to that of Washington, 
who also is associated with Northamptonshire, and consequently we 
have' little chance of meeting with sufficient records which will help 
us to trace out a connected pedigree. 

It is clear, nevertheless, that in the latter part of the sixteenth 
century one of the Kilsby family, Ralph Garfield, emigrated to 
London and amassed considerable wealth in mercantile pursuits, 
while his grandson Benjamin Garfield aspired to coat armour, and 
entered his pedigree at the Herald's Visitation in 1063; this family, 






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1895.] Notes on the English Garfield*. 195 

it will be remembered, ceased to exist in the male line on the death 
of Benjamin Garfield in 1680. To the pedigree of this London 
line, printed in ISM, it seems desirable to add the further informa- 
tion since obtained. 

Ralph Garfield, who described himself in his will as "citizen & 
dyer of London," though his grandson dignified him with the title 
of (( esquire " and styled him " of Kilsby," bought land at Totten- 
ham, Middlesex ; this appears from his son's inquisition post mor- 
tem, the proceedings on which now follow : 

Writ of diem clansit extremum directed to Ralph Briscoe, Esq., escheator 
of Middlesex, dated 27th November, G Charles I. [1630], on the death of 
Benjumiri Garfeild, gentleman: — 

Inquisition taken at the Quest House, High Ilolborn, 31st January, 
G Charles [1G31], on the death of Benjamin Garfeild, gentleman, before 
Ralph Briscoe, escheator of the Lord the King in the said county, by the 
oath of Samuel Clerke, etc., who say, etc. 

That the said Benjamin Garfeild at the time of his death was seized in 
his demesne as of fee in the moiety of one messuage and 4 acres of land 
with the appurtenances to the said messuage adjoining, and 2 acres of land 
called Marygolds, and in the moiety of 2 acres of land called Stones, and 
in the moiety of one acre of land formerly called TJie Grove, lying at Dead- 
man's 11 ill, and in the moiety of two acres of land and one cottage built 
thereon, in the occupation of ... . Lane, widow, and in the moiety of 1| 
acres of land in Longbridge Fields, all which premises are situate in Ed- 
monton, Middlesex. That he was also seizsd in the moiety of one field 
called Thether House Meade, containing G acres, in Tottenham, Middlesex, 
and in the moiety cf 2 acres of land at Chapman's Green, Tottenham, and 
in the moiety of 1 acre and 1 rood of land and 4 acres of wood, in Totten- 
ham. That he was also seized of one tenement called Belsars and 1£ acres 
of land to the same adjoining in Edmonton, and 2 acres of land called 
Dodeshill, in Edmonton, and one wood called Mark Grove, containing G 
acres, in Edmonton, and in three closes of land called Sprattman's, contain- 
ing 1 2 acres, in Tottenham, bought by the said Benjamin Garfeild of one 
John Davies, and in one messuage situate in Bowes, in Edmonton, and one 

acre of laud to the same belonging, bought of Richard Fox and 

Turnedge, and one parcel of land called Adam's Mead, containing 3 acres, 
and in other parcels of land called Stonelands, containing 3 acres, and in 
one close called Claypitts, containing 4 acres, and in one other close of land 
called Curtis Grove, containing 5 acres, and in one messuage and a parcel 
of land called English Grove, containing 2 acres, bought of Geotfery Walk- 
den, which last-mentioned premises pre situate at Edmonton. That he was 
also seized of \h acres of land and wood in Tottenham with the messuage 
built thereon, bought by Ralph Garfeild, deceased, father of the said Ben- 
jamin, of Thomas Edredge and John Edredge. 

That the said Benjamin Garfeild oy his last will on the 14th September 
last declared as follows: — "And as touching the ordering and disposing of 
my messuages, lands, tenements, and hereditaments, with their appurten- 
ances whatsoever, I hold in fee simple within the county of Middlesex or 
elsewhere I give, devise, and bequeath tlu same unto my said son Benjamin 
Garfeild, and to his heirs and assigns for ever." 






, 



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■ 



19G Notes on the English Garfields. [April, 

That the said Benjamin Garfeild died on 15th October last [1630]. 
That Benjamin Garfeild is son and nearer heir of the said Benjamin Gar- 
feild, and on the 20th March last was of the age of 10 years. That Eliza- 
beth Garfeild, relict of the said Benjamin Garfeild, is now living at Clerkeu- 
well, Middlesex. 

That the premises in Tottenham held of the Dean and Chapter of St. 
Paul's as of their manor of Bowes are worth 13 solidates of rent per an- 
num. That Belsars, etc., are held of the same Dean and Chapter, and are 
worth 10s. per annum. That the premises called Dodeshill, etc., were held 
of whom the jurors know not, and are worth 10s. per annum. That the 
« premises bought by Ralph Garfeild, deceased, were held of whom the jurors 

know not, and are worth 1 2d. per annum. 

Writ of melius inquirendum, dated 28th February, 6 Charles I. [1631] 
on the death of Benjamin Garfeild, gentleman : — 

Inquisition in pursuance of last-mentioned writ taken at the Quest 
House, in High Holborne, before Ralph Briscoe, Esq., by the oath of, etc. 
who say, etc. 

That the premises called Dodeshill are held of the Dean and Chapter of 
St. Paul's in free socage by fealty and an annual rent. That the close, 

etc., called Claypitts were held of Heborne, Esq. as of the manor of 

Willoughbies, in Edmonton, by fealty and the rent of 4d. per annum. That 
the close called Curtisgrove was held of the lord king as of his manor of 
Edmonton, by fealty and the rent of 20d. per annum. That English Croft 
is held of whom the jurors know not. That the messuage and \\ acres of 
land in Tottenham are held of the Right Hon. Hugh Hare, Lord Coleraine, 
as of his manor of Tottenham by the annual rent of Id. 

We have already seen from Ralph Garfield's will that his son 
Benjamin Garfield was " beyond the seas in 1G07," and the follow- 
ing extract shows that his grandson Benjamin was likewise a 
traveller out of England : 

Journals of the House of Commons, 21 April, 1642: 
a Resolved upon the question, That Benjamin Garfield of Middlesex and 
lVlor Cowper of Huntingdon Ksquhos, shall have a Warrant under M r 
Speaker's Hands to go beyond the Seas, without the Lett or Interruption of 
any of his Majesty's oiheers of the Ports, notwithstanding any former Order 
of Restraint." 

From the Chancery Proceedings, Bills and Answers, we get the 

following : 

\ ... 

A bill of complaint dated 25 January 1G29 by Benjamin Garfield of St. 

James, Cleikenvvell was tiled against John Highway and Mary his wife and 

relates to an alleged mortgage of the "Star" in Shoreditche. 

By way of reply, Highway seems to have taken proceedings 
against Garfield, the nature of which is sufficiently indicated by the 
next document, which we abstract: 

Bill of complaint, dated 1 December 1630, by John Highway, citizen & 
brewer of London: recites his bill in Hilary term last against William 
Atkinson and Benjamin Garfield both deceased. 












' 





















' 



1 



: 



1895.] Notes on the English Garfield*. 197 

The complaint relates to the Starre in Shoreditch ; the petitioner 
started a brewery and alleged that Benjamin Garfield of St. James, 
Clerkcnwell, agreed to advance £70 in the business. Garfield paid 
part only, and disputes arose about the payment of the remainder; 
suit is brought by Highway against inter alios, Elizabeth Garfield, 
widow and executrix of Benjamin Garfield. What the result was 
we have not farther traced. 

Further entries appear in the Clerkcnwell registers, and also in 
that of St. Botolph, Bishopsgatc, from which we may infer that 
"Master Ben jaihrii Garfield " who had removed to the then more 
fashionable locality of St. Giles in the Fields, had some poor kin- 
dred around him ; how they were akin to him we have no means of 
saying. 

Register of S. James's, Clerkenwell. 
Christenings : 

1616. June 9. Henry son of Benjamin Garfeild. 

1617. June 15. Elizabeth da. of M r Benjamin Garfeild, in their house. 

1618. July 29. James son of D° 

1619. Nov. 21. Mary da. of D° 

1620. Sep. 17. John son of D° 
*1621. Feb. 13. Anne da. of D° 

1623. Oct. 5. Audley son of D° & Elizabeth his wife. 

1630. Nov. 28. Edward Godward & Katherine Garfeild mar d 

1617. July 26. Eliz. d. of 13enj. Garfield bur' 1 

1620. Sep. 24. John s. of D° bur d 

1621. Feb. 17. Ann d. of D° bur d 
1625. May 4. James s. of D° bur d 
1630. Oct. 18. M r Beniamyn Garfeild bur. in y e Vault. 
1653. July 1. Frances d. of Ben, Garfeild bur d 

Marriages. 

1679. Jan. 29. Master Willia Stone (or Store) & Mistris Mary Gar- 
feill. by lie. 

Christening. 1670. June 6. Thomas s. of Willm & Mary Garfeild. 
Burial. 1661. Aug. 12. Frances, wife of Benjamin Garfeild, bur d in 

the Church. 
Christening. 1680. Apr. 3. Willia s. of Willia & Mary Garfeild. 

Burials. 

1680. Oct. 10. Master Beniamiu Garfeild buryed from S fc Giles's in 

the feilds. 
1682. July 18. Willia Garfeild a Wever, an Tnhahytant. 
1683-1. Feb. 8. William son of W m Garfeild, weaver, from the 

Black Swan. 
1685-6. Mar. 22. Mary Garfield from Bull Alley. 

Register of St. Botolph, Jh'shopsgate. 

Baptism. Benjamin son of William & Ann Garfeild 19 November 1668 
Burial. 19 March IQfg-. Benjamin Garfield. 
* 1621-2. 


































. 












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' 






198 Notes on the English Garfields. [April, 

On 20 February, 1 G 7 2 , administration of the goods of John 
Garfield, late of St, Mary, Matfellon alias White Chappell, co. 
Middlesex, was granted to Elizabeth Garfeild, the reliet. 

Marriage licenses granted by the Bishop of London. 

1G2G-27. Jan. 25. William Sanky of S l Mary Woolnpth, citizen & 
goldsmith, a bachelor aged about 26 and at his own government, and Ann 
Garfield of the same parish, maiden, about 21, her father deceased. 
George Dale of St. Mary Wool church, goldsmith, testifies the consent of 
Ann Blackmore als Garfield; at St. Mary Woolnoth. 

Dismissing from our notice the London Garfields, we return to 
those of Northamptonshire and Warwickshire. The existence of 
the latter was unknown to us until the issue of the calendar of 
Lichfield wills in the Index Library, which showed five wills and 
two administrations. Moreover, the Rev. H. I. Longden found three 
more at Northampton, and printed exact copies of them in North- 
amptonshire Notes and Queries. These various testamentary 
documents are shown in the following list : 

*1543. Thomas Gardfylde of Kylysby, Northampton. 

*I544. Robert Gardefelde of Kyllysbye, 

1556. Thomas Gradfyld of Ashbye legers, " 

1568. Robert Geyfild of Ashebie Leagers, " 

1571. Elizabeth Garfeilde of Ashbie Legers, Peterborough. 

1586. Kdwarde Garfeelde of Ilillmorton, Lichfield. 

1582. Ilenrie Garfeeld of Hilton, 

1581. William Garfield of Hilton, 

1596. William Garfield of 

1597. Robert Garfeild of Church Lawford, " 

1601. Thomas Garelield of Ashbie Leogers, Northampton. 

*1(>08. Raffe Garfield of London, P. C. C. 

1618. William Garfield of Clifton on Dunsmore, Lichfield. 

*1618. fdohn Garfield of Kilsby, Northampton and P. C. C. 

1620. Robert Garfield of Church Lauford, Lichfield. 

162 1. Thomas Garfield of Cold Asllby, Northampton. 

16«'51. Roger Galleeld of Milton, Northampton. 

*1633. Alice Garfeild of London, P. C. C. 

1666. Aquila Garfeild, of Islington, London, P. C. C. 

Copies or sufficient abstracts of those marked with an asterisk 
have already been printed in the Register, and the remainder in 
the preceding list are now given. Those from Northampton and 
Peterborough were transcribed by the Rev. IT. I. Longden, and 
for the abstracts of the wills, etc., at Lichfield 1 am indebted to 
the kindness of Mr. A. T. Marstor, the record clerk there, who 
gave such valuable help to the British Record Society in connec- 
tion with the calendar of Lichfield Wills which has lately been 
completed. 

f My ub.-tmet of this will given t lie Register agrees with Mr. kongdon's except, that ho 
gives the name of Ralph Garfeild's servant as 8 ton lie and adds a legacy to Thomas Massot 
son of Margaret Tomson of JJ.'I (is. St I. On the other hand he omits a legaey and incom- 
pletely lihstracts that to liatteiisse Allan. 



























































































, 





L 



181)5.] Notes on the EnylUh Garfwlda. 199 

Wills at Northampton. 
Thomas Gradfi/ld of A&fihye foyers, 1556: 

" In tho name of God Anion. Tn tho yore of o r Lord god l. r ). r )G tho 
xij diiye of January I Thomas Gradfyld of Ashbye legers hole of mynd 
and remembrance make my last will and test' in tills maimer and forme 
folowynge first I beqnethe my sole God Almightie to his mother St Marie 
and to all the holie company of heaven my bodie to be buried in the 
Church yard of Ashbye legers. Also I beqnethe to the mother clmrche 
ij' 1 . Ite, to the reparation of tlie anlter in Ashbye ehnrche ij' 1 . Ite, to tho 
sepulcrc light iiij' 1 . Also i beqnethe to Robert Gardfyld my sone vj a viij' 1 . 
to Ric, my son vj 8 viij 1 to Ralphe my sone vj 8 viij' 1 to John my sone vj 8 
viij' 1 and Thomas Gardfyld my sone vj* viij' 1 . Also I bequeth to Elizabethe 
Gardfyld my doughter vj s viij d and a sowe also I beqnethe to Thomas also 
x l vj 6 viij' 1 . The residue of my goods my body buried my detts paid I geve 
to Ilellen Gardfyld my wyf whome I make my sole executrix of all my 
goods not beqnethed she to dispose them as she shall thynk the best for the 
welthe of my sole and all christen soles in wytnes hereof S r Robert holmes 
pereiste John Cune Robert Gardfyld w fc other." 

Proved 27 April 1557. 

Robert Gey f eld of Ashbie Leagers, 1567-8 : , 

"Test. Robti gerfyle de Ashebie Leagers, Def. anno Dni 1568. 

In the name of God Amen the xvij th daye of Marche Anno Dni 1568 
I Robert Geyfild of Ashebie Leagers make my testament and last will in 
this manner following ffir&t I bequeth my soule to god my maker and 
redeemer and to his mother Si, Mary and all the holy company in heven 
and my body to be buried in the churchyard of Ashebie Leagers Item I 
gyve to the ehnrche of Ashebie legers iiij' 1 . Itm to the reparacon of the 
bells iiij' 1 . Itm to the pavement iiij' 1 . Also I bequeth to thorn's gardfyld my 
sonn xij 11 in money to be made of such goods as I have and to be delyvered 
hym at thage of xviij yeares Item [ beqneth unto Elizabeth gardfild my 
sister a hyve at the daie of her marriage. The residue of my goods not 
bequeathed my body buried my detts paide I Ltyve and beqneth to Margrett 
my wifle the w dl 1 make my soule executrix of all my goods not beqnethed 
witness hereof Sebastian boyse gylbert herman and Edmund boyse \v th 
other mo." 

Invent, xxxv 11 v 8 x a . Proved 27 April 1568. 

Will at Peterborough. 

Mi'zabcth Garflde of Ashby Legers 1571 Archdeacon's Court, 
Peterborough ; vol. iv, fo. 65. 

Testm. Eli/abetho Garlilde de Ashby legers. 

In the name of God A men the xvij" 1 daie of April! & the xiij th yeare 
of the Raigne of our soveraigne Ladie Elizabeth of England franco & 
Ireland Queue defender of ye faith &c I Elizabeth Garfild of Ashbie 
legers being sick of bodie & whole in mynd doo make my last will and 
testament in manner and forme following — my body to bo buried in the 
Churchyard of Ashbie legers* after the maimer of burial 1 Also I be- 
qnetho a cow twoo shipe xx s y l father Cure oweth mo unto Thomas Ing- 

* She was buried at Ashby St. Legcr 2'2 April 1571. 





















. 



200 Notes on the English Garfields. [April, 

land & iiij 8 vj' 1 y l Edraunde West of Wei ton owetlie me & other iiij 8 y l 
Deacono of Norton ovveth me I bequeth unto y" said Thomas Yygland Itm 
I bequethe two of my best platters unto Raffe Garfild & other two platters 
unto Thomas Ingland. Itm J bequeth Raffe Garfild ye best covering a 
blangkit yt is to make a boulster with y° feathers in & a pelowe w th ye 
feathers in Itim I forgive Thomas Garfild xxx s yt he owetlie me I be- 
queth John Garfild a hilling the blankit y l is one ye bedd a pillowe yt is in 
ye coffer Itm I bequethe [to] John Garfild ij paire of shetes And ye rest of 
my linnen I bequethe to my mother Itm I forgive William Garfild v 8 he 
oweth me Itm I bequeth Elizabeth Ilobie my goddaughter my best peti- 
cote my best smocke my chamlet sieves & my best vaile Itm I bequeth 
mother Ilobie one of my smockes. The rest of my goods I bequethe unto 
my mother to use hit according to her discretion Annodni 1 57 L Witnesses 
of the same Gruff floiti Sebastiane Boyes John Cure Thomas Johnson w fc 
others mo I make Thomas Ingland my wholl executor & overseer of my 
will. 

Prob. 1 June 1571 at Northampton 

Roger Guffeeld of Milton, 1G31. Abstract. 

May 21 st , 6 th year of K. Charles, I Roger Gaifeeld of Milton co. North- 
ampton, husbandman — to my son Nicholas £20 within 2 years after my 
decease — to daughter Susan £10 to be paid, the one £5 within two years, 
the other £5 after the decease of my wife — to daughter Cattere £10 — to 
daughter Prudence £10 — to daughter Mary £10— to daughter Margaret 
£10 — to god son Roger Randall son of Benjabe Randall my son in lawes 
child 20s — to my kinswoman Mary Gaffeeld the daughter of William Gaf- 
feeld 20s — to daughter Elizabeth 2s — my son William to enjoy all my land 
and houses within the parish of Miltoi on condition he pay the sums be- 
fore mentioned — my wife shall have half my household goods etc. — my son 
William to be sole executor — y° mark of Roger Gaffeeld, William Dey, y e 
mark of 'J nomas Seabrooke 

Proved 27 August 1631 by William Gaffeeld the son. 

Inventory of goods of Roger Gaffeeld taken 25 April 1631 Imprimis in 
the haule. One olde cubbard Is ; one old eliear Is; one table and frame, 
one forme, one brooch and bench hord, one round table, one falling table, 6s,; 
one salting hot 3s. id; stooles w th other Imple. Is; 3 peeces ofputar 2s 6d ; 
one lethare bottell, one spit and cobirens w th alother Implements 4s ; 4 
peeses of Bras 10 s . 

In the Over parlor. 2 Barrels, one Cimnill, one Wollan wheele w th 
other Implements 6s 8d 

In the Nethar Parle r, One joyned bed with the bedding belonging to 
it 26s 8d; one standing bed w Ul the bedding belonging to it 10s; one pare 
of sheets napkins pillowbeeres 8s 2 collars, one chest, one boultingtn 8s, his 
waring apparell 20s, one cow 33s 4d ; the crop of a quartere land [? 1 

old fa] 5s Id, one Cd 

Sum total xij u iiij 8 x d 

Aquila Garfeild of Islington, Middlesex, gent. 1665: 

Aquila Garfeild of the parish of St. Mary Islington county Middlesex, 
gentleman: All my lands and tenements & hereditaments whatsoever and 
wheresovcr they are lying within the realme of England etc to my dear 
and loving wife Elizabeth Garfeild and my sons James and Aquilla equally 



1895.] Notes on the English Garfield*. 201 

to be divided, the survivor to have the portion of the other dying without 
issue. To my son in law Christopher Woodward and his wife Lucina each 
of them a silver spoon. To my loving cozens William & .John Garfeild 

to each of them 5s. To my loving cozen wife to Richard 

Garfeild deceased ,0s To my loving cozen Nathan Garfeild the sum of 
10s. My sons James and Aqnilla to be executors. 

Dated 8 November 1G65 

Proved 16 November L665 by Aqnilla Garfeild one of the executors, 
power being reserved to James Garfeild. 

Thomas Garefield of Ashbie Leogers, 16Q1: 

" Testa. Thorn's Garefield de Ashbie Leogers. 

In the name of God Amen.* of Ashby Leogers in the Countie of Northon 
yeoman the xij th daie of January in the xliij Ul yeare of the Raigne of our 
Soureai^ne Lady Queen Elizabeth that nowe is being whole in mind and good 
and perfect remembrance laud and prayse be given to god make and ordaine 
this my last will in manner and forme followinge. That is to saie Hirst I 
commend my soule unto Allmightie God my maker and redeemer and my 
body to be buryed in the Churchyard of Ashby leogers aforesaid And I 
bequeath toward the reparacon of the said church iij s iiij (l . Itm I give and 
bequeath unto my sonne Richard Garefield two bedsteads that came from 
Wrightoii and one of those bedds withall furniture belonjnnge to it at the 
discrecon of his mother one cubboard standinge in the buttery, a table and 
a forme standinge in the millhouse, one brasse pot, at his mother's appoint- 
ment vj s viij' 1 to buy him a kettle, one platter and one pewter dish, one 
payre of sheets and a' to we'll. And also his mother my nowe wife to breed 
him a calfe w Ul in two yeares next after my decease And also I give unto 
him a salt acaudlesticke and x s in money. Itm I give unto Nathaniel! 
Garefield the Sonne of thafores' 1 Richard Garefield the somme of vi s viij d 
to be paid w th in one yeare next after my decease Item I give and bequeath 
unto my godsonne Thomas Browne a swarme of bees yf my bees hit well 
to be delivered to him to him (sic) w lh in two years next after my decease 
And if they hit not well then iij s iiij' 1 to be paid to him by my Executor 
hereafter named And to all the Rest of my godchildren I give iiij a a 
peece ymmediately after my decease Itm I give unto the ringers of the 
parish church of Ashbie aforesaid xij (1 upon the daie of my buriall and 
meate and drinke Itm I give and bequeath unto my sonne Willm Gare- 
field the somme of xx s to paid to him -v Ul in four yeares next after my 
decease And after my debts paide and my funerall expences discharged 
the Residue of my goods chattels cattel and ymplem ts of householde stulfo 
whatsoever I give and bequeath unto Aur.o my wife ami Isabel 1 my daugh- 
ter and to the longer liver of them whom I make and ordaine Execut ,s of 
this my last Will and Testament. And I do appoint ou'seers of this my 
present Testament Willm Browne John Myles and John Gougho whom 1 
hope will see all things accomplished accordinge to this my moaninge. In 
witness whereof I have sette my hand and eiealo to this my present writhtinge 
the daie and yeare abovesaid. These being witnesses Willm Beeke John 
Hill Willm Ragsdale 

Proved 12 Sept 1(501. 

[To be continued.] 

* The nuino of the testator is not given in tho transcript as printed in Northamptonshire 
Notes and Queries, , 

VOL. xux. 18 



■ 

■ 

■ 

I 






202 The Snow Genealogy. [April, 



THE SNOW GENEALOGY. 

By Mrs. Charles L. alden, of Troy, N. Y. 
[Continued from vol. xlix., page 72.] 

21. Joseph 3 Snow (Joseph? Nicholas 1 ), son of Joseph and Mary Snow, 

born Nov. 24, 1671, in Eastham; died in Eastham Jan. 23, 1704-5; 
married Dec. 15, 1690, to Sarah Smith, whose parentage, dates of 
birth and deatli I have failed to find. They resided at Eastham, 
and had recorded on Eastham records their first child: 

li. Thankful 4 Snow, born Jan. 15, 1C92. She probably died unmar- 
ried before 1717, for she is not mentioned in her grandfather's 
will. 

58. ii. Nathaniel Snow. 

50. iii. Joseph Snow. And perhaps others, who probably died young. 

22. Benjamin 3 Snow (Joseph' 2 , Nicholas*), born in Eastham June 9, 1673; 

died in 1748. lie married June 16, 1700, Thankful Bowerman. (I 
have found nothing certain about her, but think she is a daughter of 
Thomas Bowerman.) Benjamin Snow made his will in 1748, and 
mentions Thomas, James, Seth, Benjamin, Betty Hatch, Mary 
Pepper, Susannah Smith, Rebecca Snow, Jane Snow, Thankful 
Pats. (I have placed some of the children in the order it seemed 
to me the most probable one, where I had no dates to guide me). 
Children : 

Elizabeth 4 , born Oct. 10, 1702. 

Mary. 

Benjamin. 

Thomas, born Feb. G, 1706-7. 

Susannah, born Nov. 12, 1708. 

Rebecca, born Sept. 25, 1710. 

James. 

Thankful, born Jan. 18, 1712-13. 

Jane Snow, born March 4, 1714-15. 

Seth, 

23. Sarah 8 Snow (Joseph, 2 Nicholas 1 ), born in Eastham April 30, 1677; 

died after 1717; married Feb. 15, 1699-1700, Benjamin Young, 
son of John and Until (Cole) Young, grandson of John Young, the 
first settler in Eastham. Benjamin Young's mother was sister of 
JoHn Cole, who married Kuth a Snow (Nicholas). Children: 

i. Thankful 4 Young, born Dec. 20, 1700. 
ii. John Young, born April, 17, 1702. 
iii. Daniel Young, born April 4, 1704. 

2<t. Ruth 3 Snow (Joseph? Nicholas 1 ), born Oct. 14, 1679; died after 
1717; married James Brown April 13, 1701. They resided in 
Eastham before the division of the town. James Brown may have 



60. 


i. 


61. 


ii. 


62. 


iii. 


63. 


iv. 


61. 


v. 


65. 


vi. 


66. 


vii. 


67. 


viii 


68. 


ix. 


69. 


X. 



1895.] Oapt. William Meacham at Bunher Hill. 203 

been the son of the first settlers, William and Mary (Murdoeh) 
Brown. Children : 

i. JOSEI'II 5 JiltOWN. 

ii. Jesse Brown. 

iii. Ruth Brown. 

iv. Zili'iia Brown. 

v. Jane Brown. 

vi. James Bkown. 

vii. George Bkown. 

viii. KehI'X'Ca Brown. 

ix. Benjamin Brown. 

Note.— It is almost impossible to place the different daughters. A Sarah 3 
Snow (perhaps Mark 2 , Nicholas 1 ) married Daniel Hamilton August 5, 1708. 
If so, she may have died, and he married then a daughter of Joseph- (Nieholas 1 ), 
either Mary or Jane, and had a daughter Rebecca. 



CAPT. WILLIAM MEACHAM AT BUNKER HILL. 

By E. S. Willcox, Esq., of Peoria, 111., Librarian of the Public Library. 

William Meacham, of New Salem, Mass., captain of a com- 
company of so-called minute-men, was killed in the battle of Bunker 
Hill, but J have been unable to find any published record of that 
fact, and am told that his name does not appear upon the marble 
tablets at Bunker Hill, which profess to give the names of officers 
who fell in that action. 

In the Register, vol. 27, for 1873, page 122, his name is given 
in a " List of officers who were in the battle of Bunker's (Breed's) 
Hill, June 17, 1775, not named in. Frothingham's 'Siege of Bos- 
ton,' second edition," as captain in Col. Benjamin Buggies Wood- 
bridge's Regiment, but it is not stated that he fell there. 

As Capt. Meacham was my mother's grandfather, and as family 
tradition and the family Bibles claim that he avus killed at Bunker 
Hill, I have naturally looked for some official or published confirma- 
tion of the fact, but, until this last summer, without success. 

While in Boston, July last, pursuing my inquiries, Mr. G. W. 
Brown, the obliging attendant in the rooms of the Massachusetts 
State Archives, State House, handed me the original paper, well 
preserved, of which the following io a copy : 

December ye 15 th 1775 This may certify that 1 William Stacy & I 
William Smith & I Hon'" lla.skall wore well-knowing to the guns of Ctipt W m 
Meacham and that of .John Ganson, the sd Capt were killed the sd John 
were wounded in the action on Bunkers hill ye 17 of June last we therefore 
have Prized the sd Capt. gun at £3 00 3 00' 1 the Bayonet and Belt at £0 
























' 






201 Capt. William Meaoham at Banker Hill. [April, 

09 8 OS' 1 and the sd Jnp, gun at £2 14 H GO' 1 the sd capt. gun was a 
ci) m pi eat fuze* the other a New french Regular gun 

William Stacy JM »j* r 

William Smith Lt 

Benj' n IIascall Sergt. 

Massachusetts Archives, vol. 13S, page 875. 

Here is the incontestable proof of what I was seeking, carefully 
filed and indexed and easily found at a moment's notice. My astonish- 
ment at finding such a document as this, at holding it in my hand, 
may be imagined, and also my gratitude to the grand old State of 
Massachusetts for so sacredly preserving and guarding the original 
records of the deeds of her brave sons. 

But Mr. Brown gave me a still greater surprise by stepping back 
into one of the alcoves and bringing me the original muster-roll or 
pay-roll of my great-grandfather's company, a little faded and yellow 
with age but in perfect preservation, containing the names of the 
fifty-throe men who composed the company, date and place of enlist- 
ment, number of miles marched, amounts due each one for mileage, 
service, etc., etc., etc., and on the back, endorsed for filing, in a bold, 
clerical hand, the following: 

Capt. W m Meaoham 

Army Roll £ 205: 18/0 

Jan* 9 th 



Coll Wodhridge' 



Reg 1 . 



This muster-roll was headed: "A muster-roll of the Company 
under the command of Captain John King in Colonel Wood- 
bridge's Regiment to the first of August, 1775." 

The first line is in substance as follows : 

William Meaeham, town, New Salom; rank, Captain ; killed Juno 17; 
time of enlistment,, May ye 11 "' ; travel, 90 miles; amount, l' 1 a mile 7/0; 
time of service, 1 month 9 days ; whole amount, £8 05 s 1 1 <1 l' 1 ; guns 1, 
bayonet 1, himself lost June 17, and 30 on. 

The second name on the roll is that of John King, sergeant, then 
captain, the one who succeeded Capt. Meacham in command, and 
who made out the quarterly pay-roll, Aug. 1st following. It is 
his name, evidently taken from this pay-roll, which appears in place 
of Capt. Meacham's in the REGISTER, vol. 27, p. 122, for 1873. 

In this list or roll of fifty-three men in Capt. Meacham's company, 
who were mostly from New Salem, appear also the names of Jere- 
miah Meacham, Jonathan Meacham, John Meacham — four brothers 
Meacham — and Moses Curtis, who married their sister Mary Meacham 
after whom my mother was named. John Meacham died many 

* For fuzee, no doubt. 



1 

I 

- 






1895.] Oapl. William Meacham at Jhuiker Hill. 205 

years afterwards at Benson, Vt. Jeremiah died in Oneida Co. 
N. Y., and Jonathan at Petersham, Mass. Moses Curtis was the 
grandfather of the Key. Dr. Harvey Curtis, a graduate of Mid- 
dlebury College and subsequently President of'Knox College, Gales- 
burg, 111. 

Capt. William Meacham was born in Salem, Mass., March 10, 
1742, and married Sarah Cook in 1771 — the ancestor of the family 
came over to Salem previous to 1040, from Somersetshire, England. 

After his death his widow with her two young children, William 
and Jeremiah, removed to North Adams where she taught school, 
and then married Zadok Everest, a widower from Tieonderoga, 
N. Y., With two children, William and Sally. They had ten chil- 
dren more — Lois who married Erastus Swift of Bridport, Vt., son 
of the Kev. Dr. Job Swift, and after whom I was named ; Zadok, 
Dudley, Udney, Hiram, Solomon, Charles, Loraine (grandmother, 
I think, of the Murrays of Clarendon Springs, Vt.), Blioda and 
Esther. The Everests were a large family connection long well 
known on the lake shore in Essex Co., N. Y., and in Addison Co., 
Vt. The Sally Everest mentioned above married Loudon Case 
and lived many years in Hock Island, 111. 

Since, so far as I have been able to discover, there exists no 
published acknowledgment* that Capt. William Meacham lost his 
life while commanding a company at Bunker Hill, although there 
is abundant and easily accessible evidence of the fact in the Massa- 
chusetts State Archives, I have thought it a matter of historical as 
well as family interest to publish these particulars. There are many 
descendants of Capt. Meacham and his brothers who will be inter- 
ested in knowing them. 

Mr. Edward B. Hill, a lawyer, 45 W«\ll Street, New York, and great- 
grandson of the Jonathan Meacham who died at Petersham, has a correct 
copy of the muster-roll mentioned above, which I have asked him to send 
you for publication, if you can find space for it. E. s. w. 

*Note. — I have read with interest the foregoing account of Capt. William 
Meacham, and I am glad to report that his services have already been recognized. 
In t'889 the City of Boston erected Memorial Tablets in Wintlirop Square, 
Charlestown, inscribed with the names of all the soldiers and officers who. were 
killed at Bunker Hill. On page 136 of the printed Memorial volume, j'O-u will 
find commemorated General Warren and eight other ofllccrs. 

Later on 1 Obtained proof that two more olllcers were killed there, viz: Capt. 
William Meaehani and Lieut. Benjamin. West. In City Doc. No. 54, of 1890, I 
printed the evidence regarding Lieutenant West. I printed a letter in the 
iSprint/jicId Republican of .Inly 1J0, 1889, stating Captain Meacham's claims, 
based on a paper then recently found on the files at the State House, and asking, 
for particulars about him. Soon after, tnon^h I do not recall the date, I 
obtained leave from the proper authorities, and had these two names added on 
the bronze tablet. For some four years, therefore, Captain Meacham has been 
properly honored and the tablet can be seen by every visitor. 

I am very uhul however that ignorance of the action of the City of Boston 
lias led Mr. Willcox to prepare the preceding account. 

Old VouH~. House, Boston. William 11. Wumvioiuc, City lieg istrar. 

voi..\\rix. 18* 



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208 Notes and Queries. [April, 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 

Notes. 

Descendants of Benjamin Clarke and Miriam Kilby. — An excellent article, 
entitled " Christopher Kilby, of Boston," may be read in the Register, of 1872, 
Vol. xxvi.^pp. 43-49. Kilby's first wife Sarah, whom he married Aug. 17, 1720, 
was a daughter of the Hon. William Clark, and niece of Dr. John Clark ; she died 
April 12, 1739, se. 31, some six months before her husband was sent to England, 
as the Provincial Agent. Other notes in the same volume (p. 437) and from the 
same pen, respecting the family of William Clark, are notably at error as to the 
son Benjamin, who is stated to have married (Ap. 2, 1724) Miriam Kilby, cousin 
of the Agent, and to have had descendants by the name of Mason, Philips, 
Cutler, etc. In a letter of Feb. 11, 187G, the late Charles W. Tattle, Esq., who 
wrote the account of Mr. Kilby, and the subsequent notes, says : "I took some 
pains to be accurate in my statements, in the little sketch of Mr. Clark and his 
descendants, in the Rkcjistkr referred to. 1 have gone over my authorities again 
to some extent, and liud only this amendment to make, viz. : Benjamin Clarke 
signed his will adding a final e to his name; I have many of his father's letters, 
all without the final e." lie then proceeds to state that the Benjamin in 
question died in 1746, leaving a will which mentions his wife and the children 
(as given in' the Register, 1872); among them Benjamin, a minor, "now in 
College. 1 got some information of this Benjamin's descendants from an old 
gentleman living here, son of the late Hon. Jonathan Mason. He told me that 
Benjamin, II. C, and his brother Christopher, never married. They were his 
great-uncles." 

In refutation of the above statement, it will perhaps be sufficient to say that 
Benjamin, son of the Hon. William Clark, was bap. at the O. N. as late as Aug. 
10, 1718, and consequently could not have married in 1724; and that on Jan. 6, 
174G-7, Benjamin Clarke, merchant, and Rebecca Winslow, widow, two of the 
children and heirs of William Clarke, E-;>q., deceased, to their brother-in-law 
Thomas Greenough, mathematical-instrument maker, quit claim in the estate of 
the late William Clarke, now occupied by his widow Sarah Clarke, one messuage 
near the Old North meeting-house, butted on n.e. by land of Thomas Hutcheson, 
said Benjamin Clarke and Rebecca Winslow and Susanna wife of the said Ben- 
jamin Clarke," &C. ; Suit*. Deeds, Vol. 71, p. 264. Ten years later the house was 
sold by Greenough to Sir Charles II. Erankland. Clarke died a widower and 
childless, before the close of the Revolutionary War. 

As regards the Benjamin Clarke who did marry Miriam Kilby, we gather from 
the Boston records that Pilgrim Simpkihs, having buried his tirst wife Miriam 
in Nov. 1060, was married a year later to his second, Catherine Richardson. The 
first was mother of Miriam, wife of Thomas Tyler, whose second son William, 
b. 1(587, married first Sarah Royall, and second, Jane, widow of Capt. Benj. 
Clark' of Kingston, N. 11., and sister of Sir Win. Peppered. By his second mar- 
riage Simpkins had two daughters : Rebecca, b. 14 March, 1665, and Sarah, b. 21 
Sept., 1668; the: fft'st married John Kilby and was mother of Chistopher, the 
Prov. Agent; the second married March 20, 1691, Christopher Kilby (brother of 
John), and had Christopher, b. July 24, 1692, and Miriam, b. Dec. 5, 1696, who 
married, April 2, 1724, Benjamin Clarke of Boston, after whose death she be- 
come the wife of Samuel Hill. Mrs. Miriam Clarke's portrait, by Copley, was 
lately in the possession of her gt. -grand-dan., Mrs. Thomas W.Phillips.* In 
his will of Jan. 21 , 17-16, proved l<Yb. 16, following, Benjamin Clarke, " felt- 
maker," of Boston, " inllrin & weak of body," mentions his wife Miriam and 
live children, all under age", viz. : Benjami-i, who is to be sent to Harvard Col- 
lege, Christopher, Miriam, Surah and Mary. \\\ the Inventory of Feb. 23, 
Clarke is styled " hatter." John Phillips was appointed executor. As to the 
children; Benjamin, II. C. 17150, is starred as dead in 181 1 ; his business was that 
of a brazier; Christopher was living in 1760, a shopkeeper of Boston ; Miriam 
m. Oct. 12, 1747, Jonathan, son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Scollay) Mason, 

* A. T, Perkins' Life and Works of Copley, Boston, 1873. 



1895. J Notes and Queries. 209 

brazier, deacon of the 0. S., wlio was Living 1795, father of the Hon. Jonathan 
Mason, U. S. Senator, b. Aug. 30, 1752, and of Miriam Mason, I). June 1G, 1754, 
who in. Sept. 13, 1774, Lt. Gov. William Phillips, who d. May 2(5, 1827, sa. 77; 
Sarah was living in 17G0 the wife of Ebenezer Backus of Norwich, Ct. ; Mary 
b. 1728, m. Nov. 27, 1750, John Cutler, brass-founder, son of David and Anne 
Cutler; he was bapt. at King's Chapel, Nov. 8, 1723, and both were living in 
17!)5. Suffolk Deeds, Vols. 93, p. 101 ; 94, p. 214; 179, p. 197. I. J. G. 



York County (Mc.) Deeds. — 

The attention of genealogists is called to the value of the ten volumes of the 
deeds recorded in York, which have been published under the auspices of the 
Maine Historical Society, covering the period 1(542-1722. They contain a great 
amount of family history of interest to genealogists of the other New England 
States. The Indian Wars of 1G76-1690 drove away about all the settlers along 
the Maine coast, and they became scattered throughout Massachusetts, New 
Hampshire, Rhode Island and Connecticut. For nearly a third of a century 
the Province of Maine was left to the aboriginal residents and during that time 
those who had fled from their old home became permanent settlers in their 
several places of refuge, and when the province began to be resettled 1710-1730, 
they or their descendants sold their Maine estates to others. The deeds oC trans- 
fer contain, therefore, many recitals of old and new residences, descents and re- 
lationship, etc., which are of extreme value. I emote examples from some of 
the late volumes to show this feature and I would advise genealogists to consult 
the fine indices of these ten volumes before they give up the search for some 
elusive ancestor. ; 

New Hampshire. Job Clement of Dover with the consent of Capt. John 
Heard and all the rest of the children of James Heard, late of Kittery transfers 
certain property. Signed by Job Clement, John Heard, John Warden, Robert 
Evans and Samuel Small, 1713. (IX., 266.) 

Massachusetts. Ebenezer Wing of Sandwich sells to his brother-in-law 
Nathaniel Backhouse of the same town and Daniel Backhouse of Dartmouth to 
his brother Nathaniel, certain property belonging to their father Francis Back- 
house, late of Saco, 1719. (X., 183.) This name is modernized as Backus. 

Matthew Fstes of Salem and wife Philadelphia, " in time past relict wkldow of 
Edward Hayes, late of Kittery." 1719. (IX., 205.) She was daughter of 
Reynold Jenkins. 

Rhode Island. Isaac Nash of Kingston, and Dorothy his wife, daughter of 
Thomas Littlefleld, deceased, late of Wells, sells certain property in latter town; 
and Lt. Win, King of Sutton, Mass. and wife Rebecca, another daughter, also 
dispose of their rights, 1718. (IX., 146.) 

Connecticut. Richard LIunncwell late of Winter Harbor (Saco) to his 
brother John, formerly of same "now resident at Connecticut," 1G92. (IX., 
179.) 

Dennis Morow CMorough) Senior, of Norwich sells his lauds in Falmouth, 
Me., 1714. (IX., 342.) 

New York. Matthew Rew, late of Kennebec River, now resident of Staten 
Island, sells certain property at former place 1G83. (X., 262.) 

Charles E. Banks. 



Childs Family.— In the genealogy of the Child, Childs, Childe family, by 
Elias Child, Utica, 1881, page 682, Reuben Childs is given as the head of a large 
body of descendants. His ancestors are reported unknown to the writer. His 
posterity may be glad to learn that Reuben Childs was son of Asa Childs and 
Rhoda, daughter of Capt. Benjamin Wright, a noted partisan ©Ulcer in the Indian 
wars. Reuben was born at Deerfleld, and baptized February 15, 1755. He was 
one of the minute men who marched from Deerfleld under Capt. Jonas Locke, 
on the Lexington alarm, April 20, 1775. He soon enlisted in the company of 
Capt. Joseph Stebbins, his old lieutenant, and was under him at the battle of 
Bunker Hill. Capt. Stebbins had not then secured his commission; it was 
signed by John Hancock, President of Congress, July 5, 1775. Childs was out 
again on the Burgoyne invasion, and in 1778 on the alarm at New London. He 
went to Conway in 1812, where he died October 15, 1843. 

Deerjield, 3fass. George Sheldon. 



Jan 


7 


1709 


Aug 


8 


1711 


July 


22 


1712 


Dec 


10 


1714 


Sept 


22 


1716 


July 


22 


1718 


July 


22 


1719 


Sept 


10 


1721 



210 Notes and Queries, [April, 

Greenleaf Family Rbcoud : — 

" Samuel. Sou of Mr. John Greenleaf and Hannah his wife 
Born 20 Feb. 1080 

Martha. Daughter of Mr. John Bull and Mary his wife born 
7 August 1G78. 

Samuel Greenleaf and Martha Bull were married by Mr. Ebenezer Pember- 
ton 
Oct. 14 th 1708 

Hannah of Sam 11 Greenleaf and Martha his wife 
Born 
Elizabeth 
Samuel 
John 
Jonathan 
Martha 
Stephen 
William 

Samuel Greenleaf son of Mr. Jonathan and Mrs. Mary Greenleaf 
Born October 28, 1740 

Mehitable Snoden Daughter of Mr. William & Mr. Mehitable Snoden Born 
December the 5 1703 

Sam 11 Greenleaf and Mehitable Snoden married by Doctor Charles Chauncy 
Nov. 17, 1703 

Mehitable Greenleaf Born July 5, 1704 

Martha " " May 23, 1700 

Samuel " " July 20, 1708 

Mary Snodin " " Aug 11, 1770." 

The above records were copied by me from a Bible now in the possession of 
Mrs. S. B. Gould. The Bible was printed at London " by John Baskett, Printer 
to the King's Most Excellent Majesty and by the assigns of Thomas Newcomb 
and Henry Hills deceased mdeexxii." Another imprint is " Printed for Richard 
Ware at the Bible and Sun in Anien-Corners, mdeexxv." 

Ill the book is written " Samuel Greenleaf | His Bible | Feb. 15 | 1780 " 

Boston, Mats. Thomas Hooper, Jr. 

Note by the Editor.— John Greenleaf of Boston, the father of Samuel, above 
mentioned, married Hannah, daughter of William Veasey of Braintree, Mass., 
July 20, 1005. See Register, vol. 47, page 301, where a record of his family 
is given. No connection has yet been traced between him and Edmund Green- 
leaf of Newbury and Boston. 

Roger Grant. — The following item may be of interest to some readers of 
the REGISTER, as Roger Grant is not mentioned by Mr. Savage: 

June 20 1002. Roger Grant the younger, of the Isles of Shoals, was appren- 
ticed to Ezekiel Northern! of Rowley for thirteen years in consideration of one 
hundred weight of bread and one hundred weight of pork paid immediately to 
his father and three suits of clothes, three cows not over seven years old and 
a sow pig to himself at the end of the term. 

In 1079 Roger Jr. acknowledged the receipt of the aforesaid articles. 

Cambridge, Mass. Edward R. Cogswell. 



Early Boston Book-binder.— In the York Co (Maine) Registry of Deeds, 
Vol. IX., p. 280, there is a document which refers to Nicholas Buttolph " book- 
binder" of Boston, under date of 1718, which may be worthy of record as pre- 
serving the name of one of the early bibliopegists of the Hub. 

CriARLES E. Banks. 



Queries. 



Guild.— 1. In the Guild Genealogy, published by Charles Burleigh of Port" 
land, is given the date of death of Samuel Guild (second son and eldest having 



1895.] Notes and Queries. 211 

issue of John Guild, the first of the name in Dedham), as occurring at Dedham 
January 1, 1730. Is place of death correct? I can find no record of such in 
the printed Dedham records. 

2. Nathaniel Guild (see Register, vol. xi., page 210, for note regarding 
him, copied from the Massachusetts Gazette and Post Boy of Feb. 7^ 1774), 
married Mehitable Farringtou (or HartshorneV). Who was she? When and 
where was she born? Who were her parents? When and where was she mar- 
ried? According to the Dedham records, their first child was born February 
18, 1707-8. 

3. Moses Guild, born May 14, 1725, married Rhoda Mann of Wrentham on 
February 1, 1753. When and where did they die? 

They had 13 children, born during the period of 1753 to 1770. Were they 
born in Boston? If not, where? 

4. Where were the children of Moses, second child and eldest son of above, 
born? Ciiaiiles A. Dubosq. 

4233 Regent Square, West Philadelphia, Pa. 



Wheelock: —Savage in " Genealogical Dictionary" says: 
" Of Samuel son of Ralph Wheelock I have power to tell nothing except that 
he lived in Shrewsbury." 

Ward in " Register of Shrewsbury Families" says : 

" Deacon Samuel Wheelock, whose wife's name was Lydia, came to Shewsbury 
from Marlboro' before 1720." (Shrewsbury was founded 1717.) 

Temple in " History of Framingham " says : 

u Lydia daughter of Henry Rice married Samuel Wheelock." 

By uniting these three records, I am led to believe that they refer to the same 
person, and that this Deacon Samuel was son of Ralph, and that he married 
Lydia Rice daughter of Henry and granddaughter of Edmund Rice. 

The chief discrepancy is in the difference between the date of his birth (1G42) 
and that of his first child (1695-G). But if he is that Samuel Wheelock who 
according to Temple married Lydia Rice, he must have been married late in life, 
for Lydia Rice was born 1G68, and was, therefore, 2G years his junior, and would 
have been but 2G or 27 years old at the time of the. birth of his first child. 
Among his children were: Elizabeth, Hannah, Tamar, Rachel — names corres- 
ponding to the sisters of Lydia Rice. Judson Keith Dkming. 

Dubuque, Iowa. 



Taylor and Wright. — Wanted, 1. The parentage of Thankful Taylor (one 
record says " of Plymouth"), who, Dec. 8, 1733, published her " intention of 
marriage" to Benjamin Gary, Jr., in Bristol, R. L, and was married to him 
there Dec. 2G, by the Rev. Barnabas Taylor. They moved to Providence 1737, 
and later (date not recorded) were given a letter from the Beneficent Gongre- 
gational Church, which they had joined, and where Benjamin Gary was deacon, 
to the church at riainiield, Gt., where, however, no trace of them is found. 
Their children were: 1, John, b. 1734, at Bristol; 2, Joseph, b. 173G, at Bristol; 
3, Thomas, bap. 1747, at l J rovidence; 4, Ebenezer, bap. 1747, at Providence; 5, 
Susanna, bap. 1747, at Providence; G, Nathaniel, bap. 1750, at Providence; 
7, Thankful, bap. 1752, at Providence; 8, George, bap. 1754, at Providence; 0, 
Marry, bap. 175G, at Providence; 10, Abigail, hap. 175!), at Providence. 

Wanted 2. Tlui parentage of lOlizabelh Wright, who married Aug. 2, 1750, as 
his second wife, Lieutenant Joseph Doming of Wethersllehl, Gf. She died Oct. 
11, 1788. Her children wore : 1, Klizabeth, b. 1752, md. Peter Bends; 2, Abi- 
gail, b. 1755, d. in infancy; 3, Mary, b. 1758; •!, Iluldah, b. 17G0, in. Stephen 
Richardson; 5, Gideon, born 17G2. 

David and Elizabeth (Buck) Wright, of Wethersfield, had a daughter Eliza- 
beth, b. Aug. 4, 1728. 

Jonathan and Hannah (Rand) Wright, of Wethersdeld, had a daughter Eliza- 
beth, b. Feb. 14, 1720. 

Was Mrs. Doming either of these two? r 

Any information regarding cither Thankful Taylor or Elizabeth Wright will 
bo most gratefully 1 received. 

Pouyhkeepsie, N. Y. (Miss) Helen Wilkinson Kkynolds. 



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212 Notes and Queries. [April, 

Attwood, etc.— Capt. Elijah Attwood, b. 1721; m. Nov. 21, 1751, Anna 
Goodapeed, b. 17.'H, and removed soon after to IS. Ifaddam, Ct. Me had a 
brother Andreio who was drowned before 1755; three sisters, Elizabeth, Han- 
nah, and one who in. Comslock, accompanied him to E. Maddara. lie had 

fourteen children by two wives, all born in Connecticut. Tradition connects 
him with the family of Herman Attwood, who came to Boston 1612. Who were 
his and his wife's parents? 

Miiry Rowley m. 1697 Samuel Olmsted atE. Haddam. Who were her parents? 
Was she da. or grandda. o£ Moses Rowley who removed from Cape Cod to Had- 
dam, Ct., where lie died 1705? 

Deborah Paddock, b. 1705, m. 1725 Joseph 4 Doane (Joseph 3 , Dr. Daniel, 2 Deac. 
John 1 ) of Chatham, Mass. Who were her parents? Was she da. of Robert 
Paddock, who was Selectman' at Chatham 1720? 

Mary Parker, b. 1738 (perhaps of Chatham), m. 1758 Seth b Doane (Joseph*), 
wlin removed to Middle Ifaddam, Ct. Who were her parents? 

146 Herkimer St., Brooklyn, N, Y. E. E. Cornwall, M. ft. 



Lattimer. — An ancient stone on " Old Burial Hill," Marblehead, records that 
Christopher Lattemore (sic) died in 1690, aged about 70, and his wife Mary Lat- 
timer in 1681 a; 19. The name of their son Hugh Latimer suggests descent from 
the brave and prophetic English martyr. Their daughter Susanna married John 
Pedrick, who concealed high lineage under an assumed name and was progeni- 
tor of a race of merchants. Another daughter, Mary Latimer, married Col. 
Nathaniel Norden, the earliest aristocrat of the town ; who used a coat of arms 
and "held no great correspondence with other families." Savage says Col. 
Norden was " perhaps brother of Samuel the corclwainer of Boston," but it is 
more probable that he was that son of the latter born in 1653. Can any one 
confirm this? He married, after 17l ( J, Mary, daughter of Capt. John Legg and 
witlow of Edward Brattle, who was son and brother of the two Thomases of 
Boston. Col. Norden died in 1721, and in 1728 she married Edward Goife of 
Cambridge; Norden's will states that his sister Hannah married Joshua Huse 
cordwainer, formerly of Boston, and that their daughter Hannah married Jo- 
seph Dolbi'iire, and it makes a bequest to Mary Perkins, late Mary Hooper wife 
of Samuel Hooper deceased, and to her daughter Mary Hooper; also to Samuel 
Hooper •' son to my half sister, daughter of my father by his wife my mother 
inlaw." What Hoopers were these? J. It. K. 



Williams. —In diary of Rev. John Eliot, dated, " Roxbury, Ap. 8, 1673," 
occurs the following: "Received of Colo. Williams a bag of coppers — weight 
31 pounds — in part of my salary for the year currant — the same being by esti- 
mation £1, 13, 1 lawful money and for which I am to be accountable." Who 
was the " Colo. Williams " referred to'? Those of the name living at Roxbury 
nt that date! were lloberti Williams (claimed by the Ane. & lion. Art. Company 
us a member, but not an ollleer), Nicholas his brother, Samuel Williams his 
son, a deacon of the church, and Stephen Williams, also his son, who was of 
the Roxbury militia company and afterwards its captain." 

Any information will be acknowledged by 

Bethlehem, Pa. Edward Higginson Williams. 



Ralph Lee appears as a witness in a deed recorded in Chester County, Pa., 
Book E, page 55, dated September 2, 1727, executed in London by Elizabeth 
Green, wife of John Green of London, et al., and acknowledged by Ralph Lee 
October 15, 1731, before Jeremiah Langhorn, Register and Recorder of Bucks 
County, Pa.; which appears to show that Ralph Lee was in London in 1727 and 
in Bucks County, Pa., in 1731. It would, therefore, seem probable that he is a 
relative, perhaps father or brother, of William Lee, who first appeared in Bucks 
Countv, Pa., in 1725, was married there i.i 1727, and had a sou named Ralph 
Lee. 

Wanted, record of any Lee family through any will or pedigree record, pro- 
bably of Virginia, or London, England, or other English Lee lines, having in 
the family a Ralph Lee and a William Lee living during the above mentioned 
years. Edward Clinton Lee. 

Drexel Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 


















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1895.] Notes and Queries. 213 

Hawks. — I am desirous of learning something of the ancestry and birth-place 
of John Ilawes who was a son of John llawcs. lie was born in 17G2 and died 
in Acnshnet, Mass., in 1828. At the time of his death lie held the office of col- 
lector of customs in New Bedford, Mass. lie had an uncle in Saratoga Co., New 
York, with whom ho lived when a boy. lie was a master mariner in the mer- 
chant service in the latter part of the eighteenth century. lie was a member of 
the Massachusetts legislature. His son William married a daughter of Gov. 
Marcus Morton. Any information in regard to him, and his relatives who may 
be in Saratoga Co., New York, will be gratefully received by 

Ntw Bedford, Mass. Fuanklyn IIowland. 



Mk. Ciiannkrs, a goldsmith. — Can any one show proof of an early gold- 
smith bearing the name of Channel's, either in America or abroad? 

There is in the Sigourney family a silver cup which, according to an inveterate 
tradition, came oyer with their first ancestor about 108G. The word "Channel's" 
Is stamped upon, the Sigourney heirloom— doubtless the maker's name. Its claim 
to antiquity must be continued or confuted in proportion to the light which can 
be thrown on the name Channel's; Who knows of any other silver bearing the 
same legend? The querist will be thankful for any reply addressed to him in 
Madison, Wis. , James 1). Butler. 



Rhodes. — In the old town graveyard at Newport, It. I., is the heraldic tomb- 
stone of John Rhodes, Esq., who died 31 March 1746, aged 75, "Grand Son of 
Sir Godfrey Rhodes of llowden in Yorkshire." According to Burke's " Extinct 
and Dormant Baronetcies," Francis and Charles llodes, grandsons of Sir Francis 
Rodes, Bart., a nephew of Sir Godfrey of Great Houghton, "went to America." 
Can any of the Rhode Island genealogists tell us more about this? W. S. A. 



Elwkll. — I desire to obtain the genealogy of Jabez Elwell, of the town of 
Fairfield, near Banbury, Ct., who died April 22, 1800, aged 81 years; wife's 
name Tabil ha Jones ; his father's name was William, Avho, it is presumed, was 
a descendant of Robert Elwell, of Salem, about 1G35-40. 

Can any one give me any information upon this subject ? 

iSeneca Falls^ A r . Y. Wilmot B. Elwell. 

Odell.— A recent publication, from the press of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 
of New Haven, Conn., entitled : " Ancestry and Descendants of Gershom More- 
house, Jr., of Redding, Conn," states that Bebecca was the name of the wife of 
William Odell, Sen., who was at Concord, Mass., in 1G30. What authority is 
there for this? Rufus King. 

Tonkers, A T ew York. 



Belknap (correction). — The writer of the Belknap article in the last number 
of the Register regrets its appearance with the unaccountable error of 
"Charles II," instead of Richard II. 

A less important error in the same article is the place-name " Wareham," 
which should read Marsham. A. A. C. 



Colcoud-Coefin. — Jane Collin, daughter of Tristram and Deborah (Colcord) 
Collin, was married to Edward Colcord, of Hampton, N. II., about the year 1738. 
I shall be obliged for information of the name of Edward Colcord's parents. 
He is supposed to be the son of .Jonathan Colcord (born March 4, 1(181), who 
Was/the son of Samuel (representative iu the Assembly in 1G82), who was the 
sou of lOdward the immigrant (see " Dictionary of the First Settlers of New 
England," Savage, Vol. I.). C. Howard Colkisk. 

519 Drexd Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Waltkr Bryant. — Can any one give further information about Walter Bry- 
ent or Bryant of Bow, N. II., whose Winnipesaukee Journal, 1747, was printed 
in the Lliciji st mi for. Inly, 1H7H (Vol. 32, p. 21)7)? Did he die in Newmarket, 
N. LI. V Can any account of his descendants be obtained? II. 1*. B. 

VOL. XL1X. 19 



214 Notes and Queries. [April, 

Healey. — Information wanted of a family of Ilealcys, said to belong to Ver- 
mont, ancestors of Christopher and Joseph Healey, engaged in Philadelphia in 
anti-slavery work in 1810, and supposed to be Quakers of Bucks county. Are 
these any relation to the Hcaleys of Hampton and Kensington? Address 

1520 ISth Street, Washington, D. C. Caroline II. Dall. 



Bobrrt "Boltwood.— Iii the inventory of Robert Boltwood of Hartley, taken 
April 10, 1681, appears the following- item, viz.: "Estate in the Bay, about 
£25." 

Can any one inform me in what town in eastern Massachusetts this estate was 
situated; It would seem to indicate Boltwood's earlier residence there. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. ' L. M. Boltwood. 



Blackmer.— I am tracing the descendants of Peter Blackmer of Rochester, 
Mass., who was born 25 May 1G67, and died 1 August 1717. Any information 
about any one bearing our name in any part of the country will be gladly re- 
ceived. We do not yet know who the father of Peter Blackmer was. In the 
early colonial records the name was spelled Blackmore. 

Oak Park, 111. 0. C. Blackmer. 



Replies. 

Rev. John Maverick (Register, xlviii., 207). The following interesting 
memorandum has been forwarded through the courtesy of the Rev. Arthur 
Burch, connected with the Diocesan Registry, Exeter. John Maverick, clerk, 
M.A., was instituted to Beaworthy, Aug. 30, 1615, at Silverton, co. Devon., by 
William Cotton, Bishop of Exeter, on the death of John Norrice, and on the 
presentation of Sir Jonn Arscott. The next Rector, John Crought, B.A., was 
instituted March 21, 102'.), the living being then vacant through the free resig- 
nation of John Mavericke, the last possessor thereof. I. J. G. 



Williams Family. — In the Register for 1858, pp. 297, 298, was printed a 
brief account of two branches of the Williams family. Since that account was 
written, I have found proof that Henry Williams of Amesbury was the Henry 
born in 1(199, sou of Thomas of Newbury; but 1 have been unable to trace 
Thomas any further back than his appearance in Newbury, about 1090. 1 have, 
however, recently found ah Item which may be of Interest to some branches of 
the Williams family, particularly to those who trace their ancestry to Norwich, 
Conn. 

Joseph Williams, born in 1617, son of John of Newbury and Haverhill, Mass., 
removed from Haverhill to Norwich before 1722; for, in that year, Joseph Wil- 
liams of Norwich, Ct., sold land inherited from his father, John Williams of 
Haverhill. Undoubtedly this is the Joseph Williams who was admitted to Nor- 
wich in 1702, and a vote passed that he be " entered as a whole share man re- 
specting lands." See Caulkins's History of Norwich, edition of 1866, p. 252. 

There was a John Williams who appeared in Norwich about the same time, 
and who became very wealthy and influential. The historian of Norwich states 
that he was " apparently an original emigrant." The Williams family genealogy, 
published in 1817, gives an account of his descendants, pp. 321-325, and states 
that he was born in 1680, that the family tradition was that he emigrated from 
Wales to Massachusetts, and that his first wife was Hannah Knowltou, from 
Massachusetts. Now the Joseph Williams who removed from Haverhill to Nor- 
wich had but one son, John, born in Haverhill, Feb. 1679-80, who probably 
removed with his father to Norwich, Ct., and must be the " Capt. John Wil- 
liams " referred to in the books above named. David W. Hoyt. 

Providence, R. I. 



1895.] Note* and Queries. 215 

Historical InteIligknck. 

Cratpield rAUTsn Pocuments.— Tlio importance of these parish documents 
which lie unnoticed for centuries in the solid oaken chests in our churches 
has been fully estimated by antiquaries. When registers have perished the 
genealogist has often found his knowledge supplemented by reference to the 
parochial accounts and public events, as well as the habits of our fathers in 
private, IiaveHght thrown upon them by the quaint items of expenditure which 
the Churchwardens record year by year. 

The late Rev. William Holland," Rector of Hunting-field, Suffolk, made large 
transcripts from these books, and the Cratrleld extracts have been selected for 
publication, being of unusual antiquity. They begin in 1400, and the forthcom- 
ing volume carries the record as late as 1G42. The accounts of the Parish 
Guild will be valuable to those who are studying the detail of Guild History. 
Mr. Holland lias added historical notes at the end of each year, by which the 
reader may see how the incidents of village life were frequently the reflection 
of famous national episodes, for instance how a remote Sullblk village was 
affected by the Lady Jane Grey rebellion, or by the Spanish Armada. 

Every care has been taken to preserve the original spelling, etc., and the 
editorship has been entrusted to the Rev. Canon Haven, 1). 1)., E. S. A., Vicar 
of Eressingtleld, a parish adjoining to Cratfleld. 

The work will be published by Messrs. Jarrolcl & Sons, of 10 and 11 Warwick 
Lane, E. C. 



Ci.Arr.— I have made an exhaustive collection of local material regarding the 
English ancestry of Capt. Roger Clapp and others of the name in Devonshire. 
To complete the evidence, however, will require the Parish Registers of Sal- 
combe Regis and Sidbury, both of which have most unfortunately perished (the 
latter very recently), and their missing entries can now only be obtained by a 
search of the Bishops' Transcripts in the Diocesan Registry at Exeter. If any 
members of the family take sufficient interest in their ancestry to defray a por- 
tion at least of the small amount necessary to do this and perfect their pedigree, 
I should be pleased to communicate with them. J. Henry Lea. 

18 Somerset St., Boston. 



Gillman Family. — Alexander W. Gillman, Esq., 10 Sussex Square, Brighton, 
Sussex, England, has in press a work entitled: "Searches into the Gillman 
family, including the various branches in England, Ireland and America." The 
author has been engaged in the work during the past six years. It will be 
printed in crown quarto and will make about 200 pages. Price to subscribers, 
bound in cloth, carriage paid, in England, £1 5s. ; in America, $6. 



Genealogies in Preparation. — Persons of the several names are advised to 
furnish the compilers of these genealogies with records of their own families 
and other information which they think may be useful. We would suggest that 
all facts of interest illustrating family history or character be communicated, 
especially service under the U. S. Government, the holding of other offices, 
graduation from college or professional schools, occupation, with places and 
dates of births, marriages, residence and death. When there are more than one 
christian name they should all be given in full if possible. No initials should 
be used when the full names are known. 

(Uiase. — William A. E. Thomas, Trinity College, Hartford, Ct., has long been 
occupied in compiling a genealogy of the ("base Family, which will be published by 
Joel MunseU's Sons, Albany, N. Y., as soon as a sufficient number of subscribers 
are obtained. The author expects no remuneration for his labor. The price of 
the work will be $5 a copy. Circulars will be sent to those interested. 

JSggtenton. — W. K. Hogans, Hawthorne, Elmhurst, Illinois, has in prepara- 
tion a genealogy of this family, descended from Bagat or Bagget Lggleston, 
an early settler of Dorchester, Massachusetts, who removed to Windsor, Ct. 

EvtercU. — The history of this family is being 'collected by tin; author of the 
article on the Everett family In the Register, vol. xiv., pp. 215-210. Any in- 









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210 Societies and their Proceedings. [April, 

formation will be thankfully received. Address Mr. Edward F. Everett, P. 0. 
Box 1423, Boston, Mass. 

Hart well.— J,. W. Densraore of Hillsborough Centre, N. H., has in press a 
genealogy of the Ilarhvell family. It is estimated that it will make a volume 
of one thousand pages. Further particulars can be obtained of the author. 

Hills. -^Genealogical information is being collected by the " Hills Family 
Genealogical and' Historical Association," of which Thomas Hills of Boston, 
Mass., is president, and Edward M. Hills of Taunton, Mass., is the secretary. 
Circulars furnished by the secretary. 

Junes.— * A genealogy of the descendants of Deputy Gov. William Jones of 
New Haven is in preparation by Edwin A. Hill, 2 Church street, New Haven, Ct., 
and Timothy Jones, 19 Liberty street, Banbury, Ct. Suitable blanks and fur- 
ther particulars will be furnished on application. The ancestry of Gov. Jones 
is particularly desired. Information relative to any family portraits, manu- 
scripts or heirlooms, which are still in existence, is also desired. 

Kimball.— Leonard Allison Morrison, A.M., of Windham (P. O. Canobie 
Lake), N. H., and Prof. Stephen Paschall Sharpies, S. B., of Cambrdge, Mass., 
have in preparation a History of the Kimball, Kemball, Kymbold Family in 
America and England. The authors have been for many years engaged in re- 
searches concerning the descendants of Henry Kimball of Watertown, Mass., 
and Uiehard Kimball of Ipswich, Mass., and have succeeded in tracing the origin 
of the family in England. A prospectus for publishing the work has been issued, 
which will be sent on application. The book will make a large 8vo volume of 
from 800 to 1000 pages. The price will be live dollars a copy to subscribers. 

Shi/res'. — Theodore M. Banta, P. O. Box 1401, New York city, is collecting 
material for a history of the Family of Sayre, Sayres, Sayer, Savers, &c. Thomas 
Sayer or Sayre came from England to Lynn, Mass., in 1038, and in 1GI0 was one 
of the founders of Southampton, Long Island. Mr. Banta has a somewhat full 
account of his descendants for several generations. Circulars, with blanks for 
returns, will be furnished on application. 



SOCIETIES AND THEIR PROCEEDINGS. 

New-England Historic Genealogical Society. 

Boston, Massachusetts, January 2, 1835. — The annual meeting was held in the 
Society's House, 18 Somerset street, this afternoon at three o'clock. In the 
absence of the president, Hon. Charles Levi Woodbury was chosen president 
pro tern. 

The monthly report of the Council, was read. Ten resident members were 
elected. 

The business of the annual meeting was then taken up, and the reports of the 
Council, the treasurer, the trustees of the Kidder Fund, the corresponding sec- 
retary, the historiographer, and the librarian were presented. 

George S. Mann, Esq., chairman of the nominating committee, reported a list 
of candidates for officers. Messrs. Albert A. Folsom, Oliver B. Stebbins and 
Henry Williams were appointed tellers. A ballot was taken and all the candi- 
dates nominated were elected. 

The annual address of the president was read in his absence, by the recording 
secretary. 

On motion of Mr. Mann, resolutions were adopted acknowledging the indebt- 
edness of |,1 uj Society to lion. Walbrldge A. Field, LL.l)., the retiring vice 
president for Massachusetts, and William S. Stevens, M.D., the retiring cor- 
responding secretary, both of whom declined a reelection. 

It Avas voted that the president's address, the several annual reports, the 
necrology and the other proceedings at this meeting be referred to the Council, 
with authority to print them for distribution. 

The following are the officers for 1895 : 

I'rtsidc.nt. — William Clallin, LL.1L. of Newton, Mass. 



1805.] Societies and their Proceedings. 217 

Vice Presidents. — Edmund "Burke Willson, A.M., of Salem, Mass.; Joseph 
Williamson, A.M., of Belfast, Me.; Frederick Smyth, AM., of Manchester, 
N. II.; James Barrett, LL.D., of Rutland, Vt. ; Herbert Warren Ladd, A.M., 
of Providence, II. 1. ; Edward Elbrklge Salisbury, LL.D., of New Haven, Conn. 

Recording Secretary. — George Augustus Gordon, A.M., of Somerville, Mass. 

Corresponding Secretary. — Charles Sidney Ensign, LL.B., of Watertown, Mass. 

'Treasurer. — Benjamin Barstow Torrey, of Hanover, Mass. 

Librarian. — John Ward Dean, A.M., of Medford, Mass. 

The following are the members of the Council for 1805 : 

Ex-Officiis.— William Clafliu, LL.IX ; George A. Gordon, A.M.; Benjamin B. 
Torrey; Edmund Burke Willson, A.M.; Charles Sidney Ensign, LL.B.; John 
W. Dean, A.M. 

For the Term Ending in 1S9G. — Ezra lloyt Byington, D.D., of Newton, Mass. ; 
Charles Carleton Collin, A.M., of Boston, Mass.; Don Gleasou Hill, LL.B., of 
Dedham, Mass. 

For the Term Ending in 1897. — Francis Everett Blake, of Boston, Mass. ; 
George Kuhn Clarke, LL.B., of Needham, Mass.; Albert Alonzo Folsom, of 
Brookline, Mass. 

For the Term Ending in 1898. — William Tracy Eustis, of Boston, Mass. ; 
David Greene Haskins, Jr., A.M., LL.B., of Cambridge, Mass. ; Newton Talbot, 
of Boston, Mass. 

February G. — A stated meeting was held at the Society's House this afternoon, 
the president, Hon. William Clafliu, LL.D., in the chair. 

Isaac Bassett Choate, Ph.D., read a paper on " The Town Guild." 

At the close of the paper remarks were made by several members. 

The president, being obliged to leave, called the Rev. E. O. Jameson to the 
chair. 

The reports of the Council, librarian and historiographer were presented. 
Ten resident members were elected by ballot. 

On the 18th of March next, a half century since the incorporation of the 
society will be completed, and it was voted to commemorate the event at such 
time and place as the committee may determine. Hon. Charles Carleton Collin 
was invited to deliver an historical address. A committee of arrangements, 
consisting of Messrs. Albert A. Folsom, Thomas Weston, B. B. Torrey, Oliver 
B. Stebbins and Dr. Miles Standish, was chosen. 

Resolutions on the death of Col. Eben F. Stone were adopted. 

March G. — A stated meeting was held this afternoon. In the absence of the 
president, Rev. Alonzo A. Miner, D.D., was chosen president pro tern. 

Thomas Hamilton Murray, of Lawrence, Mass., editor of the Sim, read a 
paper on " David O'Kelly, a settler of Yarmouth, Mass." 

Resolutions were passed on the death of lion. Moses Kimball. 

The reports of the historiographer, the librarian, tin; Council and the corres- 
ponding secretary were presented. Ten resident members were elected. 

The following resolution, prepared by Col, Albert II. lloyt, was adopted by a 
rising vote : 

Whereas, The Rev. Lucius Robinson Paige, D.D., the oldest living member 
of the society, will, on the eighth day of March instant,, complete his ninety- 
third year, 

Resolved, That the secretary send to the Rev. Dr. Paige the hearty congratu- 
lations of the society, and an expression of the sincere affection and respect of 
all his associate members. 

Old Colony Historical Society. 

Taunton, Massachusetts, January 14, 1895. — The 4 ( .)th annual meeting was 
held this day in Historical Hall, the president, Rev. S. Hopkins Emery, D.D.,in 
the chair. The president delivered a brief address. 

Prof . Joshua E. Crane, of Bridgewater, Mass., read a paper on "Bridge- 
water, a town of the Old Colony." 

The treasurer, the secretary, the librarian, and the nominating committee 
reported. 

Thefollowing ofllcers were elected : 

President. — Rev. Samuel Hopkins Emery, D.Di, of Taunton. 

Vice Presidents. — Hon. Edmund II. Bennett, LL.D., of Taunton, and Rev. 
William L. Chaflln, of North Eastou. 
VOL. XLIX. 19* 






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218 Societies and their Proceedings. [April, 

Recording Secretary and Librarian. — Capt. John W. D. Hall, of Taunton. 

Corresponding Secretary. — Hon. Charles A. Reed, of Taunton. 

Treasurer*. — John F. Montgomery, Esq., of Taunton. 

Auditor. — Capt. George A. Washburn, of Taunton. 

Historiographer. — Edmund W. Porter, Esq., of Taunton. 

Directors.— Hon. William E. Fuller, of Taunton; Gen. Ebenezer W. Peirce, of 
Freetown; Henry M. Lovering, Esq., of Taunton; Hon. John S. Brayton, of 
Fall River; Hon. William W. Crapo, of New Bedford; James M. Cu^hman, 
Esq., of Taunton. 

Rhode Island Historical Society. 

Providence, Tuesday, Nov: 27, 1894. — A stated meeting was held this evening 
at the Society's Cabinet on Waterman Street. 

Henry Lyman Koopman, librarian of Brown University, read a paper on 
" Ileury Howard BroAvnell, the Poet of War and the Sea." 

December 11, 1894. — A stated meeting was held this evening at the Cabinet. 

A paper by Mr. William B. Weeden on "Quality the Prevailing Element in 
Representation" was read in his absence by Prof. J. F. Jameson. 

January 8, lS95.—T\\e 73d annual meeting was held this evening; the presi- 
dent, Gen. Horatio Rogers, in the chair. The president made a brief address 
and referred feelingly to the secretary, Amos Perry, LL.D., who was confined 
at home by sickness. Resolutions were passed tendering sympathy for Secre- 
tary Perry. John T. Blodgett was chosen secretary pro tern. 

Reports from the president, the librarian and the treasurer were presented 

The election of officers for the year ensuing resulted as follows : 

President. — Hon. Horatio Rogers. 

Vice Presidents. — Hon. George M. Carpenter and E. Benjamin Andrews. 

Secretary. — Amos Perry. 

Treasurer. — R. B. Everett. 

Nominating Committee. — A. V. Jencks, J. E. Cranston and E. I. Nickerson. 

Library Committee. — W. B. Healy, H. W. Preston and Amos Perry. 

Lecture Committee. — Amos Perry, Reuben A. Guild. 

Publication Committee.— Br. James G. Vose, A. M. Eaton, W. H. Munroe, 
John II. Stiness, Amos Perry, Fred A. Arnold and J. F. Jameson. 

Committee on Grounds and Building. — J. C. Bates, I. Southwick and Edward 
Barrows. 

On Genealogical Researches. — H. E. Turner, John O. Austin, George T. Hart. 

Necrology. — W. H. Munroe, S. H. Webb and Amos Perry. 

On Finance.— R. H. I. Goddard, C. H. Smith, R. B. Everett. 

On Audit. — F. J. Chace, James Burdick and F. B. Lincoln. 

The society voted to continue the publication of the quarterly and to send it 
free to all members. 

A resolution was also passed expressing the opinion of the society that a 
statue of Roger Williams should surmount the dome of the new State House 
about to be erected. 

January 22. — A stated meeting was held this evening. 

Thomas W. Bicknell read a paper entitled " Rev. John Miles, the associate 
of Roger Williams in the matter of Religious Toleration." 

March 5. — A stated meeting was held this evening. 

Rev. Henry M. King, D.D., read a paper entitled " A Summer Visit of Three 
Rhode Island Men to the Massachusetts Bay in 1(551." The three Rhode Island 
men were Rev. John Clarke, Obadiah Holmes and John Crandall. 

MATNE HlSTOIUCAL SOCIKTY. 

Portland, Wednesday, February 6, 1895.— A meeting was held this afternoon, 
the president, Hon. James Phinuey Baxter, in the chair. 

Mr. Samuel T. Dole, of South Windham, read a paper entitled "Ancient 
Magwainqueeg." 

A paper by Mr. Parker M. Reed, of Bath, entitled " Some New Testimony 
concerning the Sea Fight between the Enterprise and Boxer," was read by the 
secretary. 












1 












1895.] Necrology of 1 Fislovic Genealogical Society, 219 

Rev. ITenry S. Burrago, D.D., editor of the Zion's Advocate, read a paper en- 
titled " The St. Croix Commission." 

In the evening a session was held, at which Mr. IT. II. Emery read a paper 
entitled " Reminiscences of the Bench and Bar." 

Full abstracts of the papers at this mooting were printed in the Portland 
Daily Press for February 7, 1895. 



NECROLOGY OF THE NEW-ENGLAND HISTORIC 
GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 

Prepared by the Historiographer, Rev. Ezua Hoyt Byington, D.D., of Newton, Mass. 

The sketches of deceased members prepared for the Register are of 
necessity brief, because the space that can be appropriated is quite limited. 
All the materials for more extended memoirs which can be gathered are 
preserved in the archives of the Society, and they will be available for use 
in preparing the "Memorial Biographies," of which four volumes have 
been issued and a fifth volume is in press. The income from the Towne 
Memorial Fund is devoted to the publication of these volumes. 

Hon. Moses Kimball, an enterprising citizen of Boston, and a generous bene- 
factor of this Society, was born in Newburyport, Mass., October 24, 1809, and 
died in Boston February 21, 1895. 

The Kimball family is descended from Richard and Ursula Kimball, who came 
from England in the ship Elizabeth in 1G34, and settled in Watertown, removing 
three years later to Ipswich. They came from Rattlesden, in Suffolk, England. 
The family line of descent is as follows : (1) Richard, (2) Caleb, (3) Caleb, 
(4) John, (5) Nathaniel, (6) David, to Moses Kimball, lately of this city. 

Mr. Kimball was a self-made man. He was educated in the public schools in 
Gloucester, to which place his parents removed when he was a child. At the age 
of fifteen he came to Boston to find a place in a store. In 1833 he was able to 
purchase the New England Galaxy, which he published a number of years. 
He published a number of famous engravings, such as " Stuart's Washington" 
and " Signing the Declaration of Independence." A few years later he estab- 
lished a "lecture room" in Lowell, where theatrical exhibitions were given, 
and where curiosities of special interest were exhibited. About 1840 he pur- 
chased the New England Museum in Boston, and a year later opened what is 
now the Boston Museum, in a building on the corner of Tremont and Bromlield 
streets. The present building was erected five years later at a cost of about 
two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. To this famous museum he gave the 
best years of his long life. For a long time it was one of the leading attrac- 
tions of Boston. 

Outside his large private business, Mr. Kimball was interested in political 
affairs. In the earlier years he was a member of the old Whig party. He 
became a strong anti-slavery man, and when the Republican party was formed 
he was early a member of it. lie was elected to the Common Council of Boston 
in 1849 and 1850, and the next year was a member of the Board of Aldermen. 
He was elected to the Legislature sixteen times between 1850 and 1876, and was 
an active and influential member, serving on the most important committees, 
and taking a leading part in the most important legislation. He was the first 
chairman of the State Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity. He was also a 
member of the Board of Directors for Public Institutions ; a member of the 
Water Board, and a director in several railroad corporations and banking and 
insurance companies. He will be remembered for his liberal gifts for public 
uses, especially for the bronze emancipation group which now stands in Bark 
Square. This elaborate work of art was designed by Thomas Ball, and cast in 















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; 












220 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [April, 

Munich. It, was unveiled December 6, 1879. A poem by John G. Whitticr was 
read; an address was delivered by Mayor Frederick 0. Prince, and prayer was 
offered by Rev. Phillips Brooks, D.l). 

Mr. Kimball was elected a member of this society February G, 1878, and had 
been a friend and generous contributor to its funds. By his will he left a legacy 
of .$5,000 to this Society. He married, June 25, 1834, Frances Lavinia Hathaway, 
daughter of John Hathaway, a prominent merchant of Boston, by whom he had 
two sons and five daughters. The sons died young. 

At the meeting of the Society March 6, the following resolutions, prepared by 
the Hon. Martin Parry Kennard, were adopted : 

Resolved, That by the recent death of the Honorable Moses Kimball of Brook- 
line, Massachusetts, this Society is called to mourn the loss of a greatly esteemed 
member, who was ever warmly interested in its work. In his passing away, this 
Society has also to deplore the absence of a distinguished and valued citizen, 
whose patriotic spirit burned with constant manifestations of generous public 
interest during his long and active career, which was especially notable for his 
devotion to our City and State, illustrated by his valuable and extended seasons 
of service in their counsels, again and again repeated in obedience to popular 
ballot, and it is also 

Resolved, That this Society deems it fltt'ng that this moderately appreciative 
mention of this esteemed citizen may be placed on its records, recalling also his 
unflinching adherence to the Union cause in past times of divided counsels, and 
again his public spirit manifested at his death by the munificence of his testa- 
mentary bequests to public charity. 

Hon. Ewen Francis Stone, A.M., LL.B., of Newburyport, a resident mem- 
ber of this Society, elected March 3, 1875, was born in Newburyport August 3, 
1822, and died in Newburyport January 22, 18D5. He was the son of Kbenezer 
Stone of Newburyport and Fanny Cooledge of Boston. He belonged to one of 
the oldest families of New England, tracing his descent through six generations 
to Elias Stone of Charlestown, who was the flrst of the name in Massachusetts. 
The family resided in Charlestown in the seventeenth century, but removed to 
Newburyport. 

Col. Stone was graduated at Harvard College in 1843, and at the Harvard Law 
School in 1846, and began to practice his profession the next year. As a lawyer 
lie attained much distinction. Everybody confided in his judgment and in- 
tegrity. He was the intimate friend of Caleb Cushing, and was an associate of 
Chonte, Rantoiil and other distinguished lawyers of Old Essex. He w r as a 
strong anti-slavery man, enjoying the friendship of Whittier, Garrison and 
Phillips. Ik: represented his native city in the House of Representatives of 
Massachusetts four years, and was three years a member of the Senate. When 
the civil Avar broke out he enlisted as a private, but recruited a company, and 
was soon commissioned colonel of the -18th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers 
and served through the war with distinction. A large part of the time his 
regiment served in Louisiana. 

He returned to Newburyport after the war, and resumed the practice of the 
law. In 1807 he was mayor of the city. He was elected a member of Congress 
in 1880 and served three terms in that body. He was an active and influential 
member of Congress. He was among the few Republicans who enjoyed the 
personal confidence of President Cleveland at that time. He withdrew to 
private life at the close of his last term. 

Few men ranked higher in Newburyport than Colonel Stone. He was a fair- 
minded man, of excellent good sense. He was a man of considerable learning, 
and was an authority in matters of local history. He was a vigorous and 
eloquent writer. 

He married Harriet K. IVrrlu of Boston. The following resolutions pro- 
pared by Rev. Samuel C. Heane, D.l)., were adopted by the New-England 
Historic Genealogical Society at its meeting in February : 

Whereas, our estimable associate, Honorable Eben Francis Stone of New- 
buryport, has been called from us by death since our last meeting, and it is our 
approved custom to put on record some memorial of our valuable members who 
pass away : 

Ilcsol r<<!, That In the death of Colonel Stouo we experience the loss of one who 
heartily contributed to the purposes of the New-England Historic Genealogical 



Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 221 




Regiment. 

We mourn him as a man of exalted character, who, with a reverend interest 
in the past, served well, and in many ways, the times in which he lived. 

[Gen. Stone published several historical pamphlets, among them an Address 
before the Essex Bar, Feb. 2, 18'89, in which lie gave sketches of three extra- 
ordinary men, natives of Essex County, namely, Choate, Gushing and Ilantoul. 
See Rkgistkk, vol. 43, page 3:34. lie was a valued contributor to the REGIS- 
TER.— EDIT'OJK.] 

Peter Thachek, A.M., of Newtonville, was born in Kennebunk, Maine, 
October 14, 1810, and died in Newtonville, October 21, 1894. lie was elected 
a resident member of this Society March 6th, 1872. 

Mr. Thacher belonged to an honored New England family, which was de- 
cended from Rev. Peter Thacher, who was born in England about 1588. Tie 
received the degree of B.A. from Corpus Christi College, Oxford, in 1008, and 
the degree of M.A. in 1611. He became a Fellow of the College in 1613, and 
vicar of the parish of Milton-Clevedon, in 1616; and in 1622 rector of the 
Church of St. Edmunds, in Salisbury. lie was a man of talents, a non-conformist 
in the Established Church. The leaders of the parish, at that time, were 
Puritans. The Bishop also favored the Puritans. The following inscription 
is upon his tomb: "Here lyeth y e body of Mr. Peter Thatcher, who was a 
laborious minister in preaching y° Gospel of Jesus Christ to y e people of Edmonds 
by y e space of XIX yeares who departed this lyfe on y e Lord's Day at night, 
being the XIV of February 1640. Let noe man move his bones. T.D." 

We may compare the last line of this inscription with that on the tomb of 
Shakepeare twenty-four years earlier : 

" And cvrst be he y l moves my bones." 

His son Thomas, who was born May 1, 1620, was prepared for the University 
by his father. But he already shared the Puritan principles of his father, 
and he could not conscientiously make the subscriptions required of those who 
entered the Universities. He preferred to cross the sea, that he might enjoy 
liberty of conscience in the wilds of New England. His parents readily con- 
sented, as they intended to follow him. This was prevented by the death of 
his mother. Thomas Thacher came to Massachusetts in 1635, at the age of 
fifteen. As Harvard College was not yet ?n operation he placed himself under 
the tuition of the learned and Reverend Charles Chauncy, afterward President of 
Harvard College. He received his education through him, and was prepared for 
the ministry. He is said to have been proficient in Latin and Greek, and also in 
Hebrew, Syriac, and Arabic, and to have been " well skilled in the Arts, especial- 
ly in Logic." He published a Hebrew Grammar and Lexicon. In 1644 or early 
in 1645 he was ordained at Weymouth, and was the pastor of the church in that 
place for about twenty years, he studied medicine as Avell as divinity, and for 
many years he was a practising physician in Weymouth. Removing to Boston 
he became eminent in the medical profession in that town. When the Third 
Church (now the Old South) was founded, he was chosen its pastor, and was 
ordained itgaiti, and installed the first minister of the church in 1670. He con- 
tinued in that station fill his death in 1078. Two of his sons were ministers. 
The list of his descendants includes a large number of distinguished men, physi- 
cians, lawyers, ministers and business men. 

Hon. Peter Thacher was of the lifth generation from the first pastor of the 
Old South Church. His father was Stephen Thacher, who was graduated from 
Yale College in 1795, and married Harriet Preble, a sister of Judge William P. 
Preble of Vork, Maine, and removed to Maine, where he had a distinguished 
and useful career. Ills second son, Peter, was prepared for college at Washing- 
ton Academy, Fast Machias, Maine, and was graduated from Uowdoin College 
in 1831, in a class which included a number of men who have since been famous 






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. 






222 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [April, 

in literature, law and political life. He studied law in Portland, with his uncle 
Judge Treble, and was admitted to the Bar in 1837. lie practised law in 
Machiad fifteen years, and sixteen years in Rockland, lie was appointed a 
Commissioner of Bankruptcy while he lived in Maine, and later he was Register 
in Bankruptcy. lie was also United States Commissioner for a number of 
years. In 1871 he removed to West Newton, Massachusetts, and opened an 
office in Pemberton Square, Boston, and later in Milk St. He resided in West 
Newton twenty-two years, and was solicitor for the city of Newton from 1876 
to 1881. He practised law in Boston until 1892, when he gave up active work. 

He was for more than twenty years an active and useful member of this So- 
ciety. He served on important committees, and contributed in various ways to 
its prosperity. He was greatly interested in compiling the genealogy of the 
Timelier family. He caused extensive researches to be made in England and 
published a valuable paper on the family history in the old country from which 
some part of this sketch has been drawn. 

He was for many years a member of the Board of Overseers of Bowdoin 
College. He was also a member of the Maine Historical Society. He always 
took a lively interest in reforms, and was an abolitionist from his early youth; 
he was an active member of the old Whig party, joined the Free Soilers and 
then the Republicans, and ever after was an Independent in politics. 
i In 18-11 he married Margaret Louira, daughter of Judge Barrett Potter of 
Portland, Maine. His widow survives him with four sons and rive daughters. 

Hon. Ciiahles Candee Baldwin, A.M., LL.B., LL.I)., of Cleveland, Ohio> 
was elected a corresponding member of this Society November 3, 1869. He 
was born in Middletown, Connecticut, December 2, 183-1, and died in Cleveland, 
February 3, 18D5. 

He was of the seventh generation from Sylvester Baldwin, who came from 
the parish of Acton-Clinton in Buckinghamshire, England, in 1038. He died 
at sea on the passage from England. His son Richard, born in Acton-Clinton, 
and baptized there, August 25, 1622, was one of the first settlers of Mil ford, 
Connecticut. Barnabas the son of Richard was born in 1605. His son Sylva- 
nus was born in 1700. Charles of the next generation was born in Milford, 
Connecticut, 1751. Seymour Wesley, son of Charles, was born in Meriden, 
Connecticut, June 29, 1807. He was a successful merchant in Middletown, but 
removed to Ohio in 1836. 

His son, Charles Candee, was prepared for College in Middletown, under 
David II. Chase, LL.I)., and was graduated from Wesleyan University in 
1855, and from Harvard Law School in 1857. He was admitted to the bar the 
same year and began the practice of the law in Cleveland, Ohio. His success 
in his profession was rapid and signal, lie gave his attention chiefly to corpo- 
ration and banking law, and in these departments he was an authority. In 1870 
he was obliged to give up for a time his professional work on account of the 
failure of his health, and at this time he traveled extensively in Europe. 

He was elected Judge of the Circuit Court of Ohio for three successive terms, 
and died in the midst of his usefulness during his third term. There was not 
much time at his command for studies outside his profession, but he was 
especially interested in historical studies. He was one of the founders of the 
Western Reserve Historical Society, and was one of its officers, lie was for 
many years a director in the Cleveland Library Association, and Avas a trustee 
and lecturer in Baldwin University. He made some valuable contributions to 
historical publications relating to the "Western Reserve. 

He married September 8, 1802, Carolina, daughter of Charles W. Prentiss of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and granddaughter of the distinguished Senator, Samuel Pren- 
tiss of Vermont. His wife and two children survive him. 

[Note.— -On page 83 of the January number of the Register it was implied 
that Dr. Stubbs, the historian, was no longer among the living. This is an error. 
Dr. S. alone among the great English historians of this century is still alive.— «.] 

The Rev. Gkindaix Reynolds, A.M., D.D., a resident member, elected 
Oct. 6, 1875, was born in Franconia, N.1L, Dec. 22, 1822, and died in Concord, 
Mass., Sept. 30, 189L He was the second child of his parents, Grindall and 
Cynthia Reynolds. His mother's family name was Kendall. His father was a 
soldier of the revolution, in turn private, ensign, lieutenant and captain. 



181)5.] Necrology of Historic, Genealogical Society, 223 

When lils son was born he was manager of some large Iron works. The child 
learned his letters at Ids mother's knee. There also he learned to read the 
Bible. At the early age of four lie was sent to the district school, in a rudely 
constructed school house, with its desks primitive and hacked, its seats hard, 
the discipline harsh. When he whs live his family took him with them to 
Boston, and he lived there successively on Essex street and at Fort Hill, lie 
attended a primary school on the corner of Federal and High streets until ho 
was seven. Promoted then to the Washington grammar school he graduated 
there at twelve with the Franklin medal. Next he went to the English High 
School, where for a large portion of his three years' course he was under the 
tuition of the well-known Thomas Sherwin. His graduation there was at the 
age of fifteen years and six months; again with a Franklin medal. For the 
four years and a half ensuing he .was with the dry goods merchants, Thomas 
Tarbell & Co,, passing from errand boy to bookkeeper in their employ. In 
1813 he left business to study a year and a half with the Rev. Chandler liobbins 
in preparation for the Cambridge Divinity School, which he entered in 1844, 
and from which he graduated in 1847. He was ordained the next year, and 
became the pastor of the Unitarian Church at Jamaica Plain, remaining there a 
little more than ten years. At that time he accepted a call to the First Parish 
at Concord, Mass., and labored there for twenty-three years as the active pastor, 
afterwards being pastor emeritus until his death. In 1881 he was chosen the 
Secretary of the American Unitarian Association, and held that office as long as 
he lived. Harvard University gave him the degree of D.D. in 1804. 

As an author he produced for denominational magazines eight or ten articles; 
for the Atlantic Monthly about the same number; and as many pamphlets bore 
his name. His discourses impressed one with his "-vigor and spiritual mus- 
cularity." What he wrote for the press showed " conscientious thoroughness 
and structural strength." " He was a severe censor of his own literary work, 
revising and rewriting till his page reflected the exact measure and shading of 
his thought." Even Ins extemporaneous utterances had much of the solidity 
and careful accuracy of his written words ; "and there were occasions when 
he was roused to remarkahle power, and his statement came swift, strong, 
square, unanswerable, settling the matter in debate beyond dispute." 

A memorial sermon by the Rev. Henry II. Barber of Meadville, Peun., pays 
him high honor as an intellectual force, as a strong influence in the denomina- 
tion to which he belonged, as a magnanimous and sympathetic pastor and 
townsman, and as a " friend of Concord's famous people and of her common 
folk alike." Judge E. B. Hoar, who drew the resolutions passed by the Con- 
cord Parish on the occasion of his death, said of him : " No call to larger duties 
or a more conspicuous position has ever changed his relation to this Parish or 
this town. He has lived and died our minister, and he loved us and we loved 
him to the end." 

These sentences from a paper written by one of the Second Congregational 
Parish, formerly a deacon of the church connected with it, and read before a 
social club in Concord, give a local estimate of the subject of this sketch : 

" A man of noble presence, cordial and hearty in his manners, kindly always, 
he would suffer a wrong — never do one. He was a wise counsellor, a sincere 
and steadfast friend. * * * His genuine sympathy was manifest in his 
acquaintance with the personal history cf the boys in blue of the Concord 
quota — their experiences and needs. When the bullet or disease brought sorrow 
to our homes and hearts, his great heart was poured out in sympathy and con- 
solation. No soldier's obsequies lacked his timely and grateful word. * * * 
He was the best man of his time on the (School) Committee, and his interest 
in the schools did not cease with his retirement. * * * He was an enthusiastic 
biographer. The Social Circle in Concord owes him a deep debt of gratitude for 
the untiring zeal with which he sought out the facts and prepared the biographies 
of many of its deceased members. This society dates back to 1782, and was the 
peace product of the ' Committee of Safety ' of the Bevolution, organized ' to 
strengthen the social affections, and disseminate useful communications among 
its members.' * * * He was broad and liberal. * * * When told on his 
way to attend the funeral of an estimable lady that she had recently embraced 
some peculiar views, his reply was: ' Her views do not make the slightest 
difference.' * * * In his former field of labor it was not customary to 
make remarks at funerals, but coming to this town, where the old custom still 












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22-1 Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. [April, 

obtains, ho at once conformed with the usage, and so wise and comforting and 
just were his words that he was sought to officiate by many outside his own 
charge. There are many living today who had hoped Mr. Reynolds would sur- 
vive them and attend their funeral. * * * lie was a man of pure and lofty 
aims, of sincere and sympathetic friendship, of broad charity, of unswerving 
fidelity to truth and right and justice, fearless and modest, a Christian gentle- 
man. " 

By Jiev. Bradford M. Fullerton, D.D. of Brockton, Mass. 

■IIbnuy Colman Kimball, A. B., elected a resident member July G, 18G4, and 
a life member in 1881, was born in Hiugham, Mass., February 20, 1820, and died 
May 10, 1804. His grandfather was Daniel Kimball, first lieutenant of Captain 
Foster's company of Colonel Wales's regiment of the war of the Revolution. 
Benjamin Gage, major of Colonel Gcrrith's regiment, of the same war, was his 
g/eat-grand father. His mother's name was Betsey Gage, who was a daughter 
of Benjamin. The Rev. Daniel Kimball, principal of Derby Academy in Iling- 
liam, was his father. The son fitted for college at the Home School which his 
father established in Needham in the son's boyhood. He was graduated with 
the Harvard class of 1840. For some years afterwards he was the principal of 
Westford Academy, spending a year in foreign travel at the conclusion of this 
principalship. In 1848 he took charge of the Lancaster Academy, remaining 
several years, and, while there, marrying Miss Harriet C. Fisher of that town. 
In connection with the outbreak of the Rebellion he was appointed to a position 
iu the Internal Revenue Department, finally taking up his residence in Stough- 
ton, where he passed the remaining thirty years of his life. There he was a 
member of the school committee, superintendent of schools, trustee of the pub- 
lic library, and town clerk. To the last place he was elected the twentieth time 
just before he died. Mr. Kimball belonged to "The Massachusetts Society of 
the Sons of the American Revolution." He was a man of simple tastes, of great 
dignity and strict integrity, and yet almost womanly in sweetness of temper and 
patience. He was drowned at sea, on his way to Philadelphia, off Block Island, 
probably falling overboard. 

By Jtiev. B. M. Fullerton, D.D., of Brockton, Mass. 

RTa.tt.HKW Adams Sticknicy, made a corresponding member May 17, 1847, 
was born in Rowley, Mass., September 23, 1805, and died in Salem, August 12, 
1801. 

lie was of the seventh generation from William Stickney and his wife, Eliza- 
beth, who came to Boston probably in 1G37, and were of the original settlers in 
Rowley, where a gram of land in the first apportionment was made to Wil- 
liam Stickney in 1G43. Matthew traced his descent from William through 
Amos,'- Benjamin, 3 Samuel, 4 Jedcdiah, 6 and Dudley 6 . His mother was Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Fowler) Davis of Tops.fl.eld. lie was 
twice married; first, on the 17th of April, 1833, to Mary Elizabeth Smith, who 
died May i), 1834, and second, Dec. 25, 1838, to Lucy Waters, who died Feb. 13, 
1847. Three daughters by his second wife survived him. 

On what seemed to him satisfactory ground for a solid inference, he believed 
Stickney, a village in Lincolnshire, nine miles north of Boston, to have been 
the English home of the family at some time, and that they probably came from 
Normandy in the train of the Norman conqueror. 

In lSG'J he published a volume of 52G octavo pages: The Stickney Family, 
containing the genealogy ami history of the family; in 1883, a volume of 247 
octavo pages, entitled The Fowler Family [that of his mother]: "A Genealo- 
gical Memoir of the Descendants of Philip and Mary Fowler of Ipswich, Mass. : 
Ten Generations, 151)0-1882.'' Besides these he left in manuscript the gene- 
alogies and histories of the families of Robert Calef (the author of "More 
Wonders of the Invisible World") and of William Waters, a householder of 
Boston in 1G52. These two genealogies would make a work of over six hundred 
pages in print, and are in form for publication. Robert Calef and William 
Waters were ancestors of his living children. 

lie also contributed valuable papers to the Register, the American Journal 
of Numismatics, and the Essex Institute Historical Collections. 

Mr. Stickney was more than a genealogist, he was emphatically a collector. 

CS, 









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1805.] Necrology of Historic Genealogical Society. 225 

the corning man. Of ancient furniture, wedding-rings, family records, Indian 
relics and almanacs, lie had great store. His almanacs, commencing with 1GGG, 
perhaps make the most complete collection to be found. Autographs and letters 
of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, and of Washington and his 
generals (including many of the French officers), of statesmen and men of 
note of the Revolutionary period, fdl a long and orderly array of volumes upon 
his shelves. Asa collector of coins and aT numismatist especially he was most 
widely known, having begun his collection at an early age, and possessed him- 
self in the course of his long life of a very great number of coins, including 
the rarest and most sought after. For cnrly issues of American paper money 
he was also a keen and successful forager. 

Mr. Stickney was not of that class of collectors who arc satisfied with mere 
accumulation. He was an intelligent and discriminating authority upon the re- 
lative merits and value of the coins, "curios" and ancient relics which he 
gathered. He was acquainted with books ; and the study of early New England 
history was his solace in many an hour of suffering, as his health, never firm, 
brought to him in the latter years of life many weary hours, which at once ac- 
counted for his habits, which were those of a recluse, and afforded him such 
occupation as suited his condition, and protected him from the sense of vacancy 
and uselessness which is often the lot of the invalid solitary. lie was never at 
a loss for something to do. 

By Rev. E. JO. Willson, of Salem. 

Frederick Deane Allen, Esq., of Boston, a resident member, elected 
January <£, 18G5, died upon the 28th day of September, 1891, at the ripe age of 
eighty-six years, lie was the son of Deacon Otis Allen and his wife Susanna 
(Deane) of Mansfield, Mass. He was born on the eighth of July, 1808. He 
was the seventh of aline of pious New England ancestry, each of whom had 
held the ofiice of Deacon in a Congregational Church. The first of this line 
was Samuel Allen, who lived in Braintree, and died in 1GG9. His descendants 
in direct line were Samuel (2d), Josiah, Micah, Micah (2d) and Otis, the father 
of the subject of this sketch. 

Frederick Deane Allen was but seventeen years old when he came to Boston 
from Taunton, where he had lived two years, lie entered the employ of Mr. 
llolbrook on Washington street. At the early age of twenty-one he entered 
into partnership with Mr. William Fowle, under the style of FoAvle & Allen, and 
they carried on a wholesale dry goods business at the corner of Milk and Kilby 
streets. 

In 1839 the firm was dissolved and succeeded by Allen & Minot, which was 
again followed by the firm of Allen, Whiting, Lane & Washburn. In 18G5 the 
firm became Allen, Lane &, Co., which was replaced in January 1894, by the cor- 
poration entitled " The Alleu Lane Company." Mr. Allen was in active business 
as a member of a firm for sixty-five years, and for forty j'ears of this time had 
lion. Jonathan A. Lane as his partner. 

His remarkable vigor aud activity up to the age of fourscore and six years 
were the surprise and admiration of all Who met him in active business. 

He was one of the directors of the National Bank of the Republic at its for- 
mation and remained so until his death. He served the Old South Church for 
many years as its Deacon ; was all his life interested in Sunday School work, and 
for seventy years, without intermission, acted either as Sunday School teacher 
or superintendent. He was especially kind to the poor, and many mourn him 
as their most faithful friend in trouble. It is significant of the place he held in 
the business community that twenty-one leading commission houses of Boston 
closed their stores during the hour of his funeral service. 

His fellow directors in the Bank of the Republic paid the following tribute to 
his memory : 

" His associates in the bank for many years, with a deep sense of personal 
bereavement, desire to place on the records of this bank their high apprecia- 
tion of his character as manifested in all the relations of his long and useful 
life; as a kind and sympathetic friend; a father, honored and revered In tho 
family; an exemplary merchant, ' diligent in business,' and of the highest 
integrity in all business intercourse; a charitable and public-spirited citizen, 
giving freely of his time and means for the furtherance of every good work in 
the community and in the Church." 
VOL. XLIX. 20 



22G i Booh Notices. [April, 

The minutes of the Church Committee of the Old South Church, Boston, also 
contain the following words : 

u He was a devoted and consistent disciple of the Master from his youth, and 
a venerated officer in this Church since 1870. * * We enjoyed his companion- 
ship, Ave trusted his judgment and respected his counsel. Genial and sympa- 
thetic in temperament, it was a pleasure to meet him and receive his cordial 
greeting. He was never happier than when serving the Churcli he so dearly 
loved. His memory will ever be tenderly and affectionately cherished by us who 
survive him." 

On June 17, 1833, he married Mary Richmond Baylies, daughter of Thomas 
Baylies of Taunton. She died in 1883. He left three children, a daughter and 
two sons, Rev. Frederick Baylies Allen, Superintendent of the Episcopal City 
Mission, and Francis R. Allen, architect. He also left six grandchildren and 
two great grandchildren. * * * 



BOOK NOTICES. 



[The Editor requests persons sending books for notice to state, for the information of 
readers, the price of each book, with the amount to be added for postage when sent by 
mail.] 

History of the Town of Hampton, New Hampshtre, from its Settlement in 1638 
to the Autumn of 1892. By Joseph Dow. Edited and Published by his 
Daughter. Salem, Mass. : Printed by the Salem Press Publishing and Print- 
ing Co. 1893. 8vo., 2 volumes, pp. ll-f-1104 in both volumes. Price $G for 
the complete work. Sold by Miss Lucy E. Dow, Hampton, N. II. 

The late Joseph 'Dow, A.M., of Hampton, who died Dec. 16, 1889, aged 82, 
commenced early in life to collect facts relating to the history of his native 
town. As far back as 1838 he was selected to deliver an historical address in 
commemoration of the two hundredth anniversary of the settlement of Hamp- 
ton. This address was printed the next year. It showed a remarkable knowl- 
edge of the history of New England, and particularly of his section of it. 
It, at once, became a standard work in local history. He lived half a century 
after that work was published, and during that time was indefatigable in col- 
lecting and arranging the history of Hampton. At his death he left the work 
practically finished. If the town of Hampton had extended to him the aid 
Which his friends asked for, the book would have been printed during his life- 
time, and under his own supervision. 

Mr. Dow was fortunate in having a daughter who shared his tastes. She has 
edited the work, and successfully carried the book through the press. Miss 
Lucy E. Dow says in her preface : " It is not easy for one person to enter into 
another's labor and carry out his plan, even though the material be ready at 
hand;" and she adds that she can scarcely hope to have realized her father's 
ideal. 

The History of Hampton shows a vast amount of labor, and both father and 
• daughter are deserving of much praise. The first volume is devoted to the his- 
tory of the town, and the second volume to its genealogy. The work is well 
printed, and is embellished with numuerous portraits, views of buildings and 
other engravings. A good index is furnished. We hope that the work will be 
liberally patronized, and that it will be found in all our best public libraries and 
private collections. 

Suffolk Deeds, Liber VII. Boston : Rockwell & Churchill, City Printers, 1894. 
8vo. 

The seventh volume of Suffolk Deeds has been issued. It has a kindred like- 
ness and interest with those which have preceded. The hopes of the friends of 
their publication are being realized. New interest in the early possession and 
transference of properties has been awakened. Historian and genealogist 
vie with each other in making service of them in proviug and disproving tra- 



1895.] i Booh Notices. 227 

ditional statements. Many thanks arc due the authorities for the support given 
Thomas F. Temple, Esq., Register of Deeds, John T. Hassam, Esq., and Frank 
E. Bradish, Esq., for the several parts they have rendered in making public in a 
larger sense this volume so full of value. The Urst deed recorded in this vol- 
ume is of property granted by Thomas Joy to Kichard Way, 18, 1 st mo, 1GG7-8, 
and thence onward to October 15, 1G72. During the early part of this period, 
the deeds were attested by Freegrace Bendall, Clerk of the County Court, and 
the latter by Isaac Addington, Recorder. He who -would know the ordinary 
living and strivings of the people of two centuries ago cannot afford to neglect 
to study the early deeds of the New England colonics. The index, like the pre- 
decessors, is superb. He who runs may read. The glance is only needed by 
the busy barrister to know the present value of a deed. Suffolk County, nobly 
followed by York County, is setting a magnificent example for other counties 
in the Commonwealth and nation. 

By Rev. Anson Titus, of Somerville, Mass. 

Americans of Royal Descent. A Collection of Genealogies of American Families 
tvhose Lineages are Traced to the Legitimate Issues of Kings, etc., etc. By 
Charles II. Browning, Ardmore, Pennsylvania. Third edition. Philadel- 
phia: 189-1. Pp. 73G. Price $10, $12 and $15, according to binding. 

Mr. Browning of Ardmore, Pennsylvania, has issued a third edition of his 
"Americans of lloyal Descent." His first edition a dozen years ago met with a 
rapid sale, and new demands have called not only for more editions, but for an 
extended Bulletin, in which are many important corections and additions. In fact 
the Bulletin is rich in worth, since it places many a family on the right, after 
wandering for a season on the wrong track. These notes become as posts of 
warning. Many of the pedigrees which foreign barristers have compiled of 
American families, in hope of gain, have pioved untrustworthy by painstaking 
genealogists. Among the families whose royal descent has been decidely dis- 
proved is the Adams family. We have several times shown the error of this 
pedigree, which was contributed in good faith to the Register for January 1853, 
pp. 39-46, by the late William Downing Bruce, F.S.A. of London. Mr. Browning 
in good spirit also joins in exposing the forgery. This is only a single case. 
He who consults Mr. Browning's book must put generous study upon the Bul- 
letin — the last and best revision of his earlier labors. An excellent index of the 
body part of the book and of the Bulletin rounds out a volume full of gene- 
alogical information. 

By Rev. Anson Titus of Somerville, Mass. 

Glimpses of Old New England Life. Legends of Old Bedford. By Abram English 
Brown, author of History of First Sabbath School of Bedford, History of 
Bedford, and Bedford Old Families. Published by the author. Boston: 
K. II. Blodgett, printer. Sold by Abraham E. Brown, Bedford, Mass. 

This book, as the title indicates, is a collection of tales of New England 
life. The story entitled "The Witch of Shawshine" is perhaps the most inter- 
esting. But, while it is fitting that our generation should be so prolific in pro- 
ducing books relating to New England life and history, it does seem as if 
some of our writers would be better occupied if they dwelt more upon the 
pleasanter and brighter aspects of colonial life. Our forefathers may have had 
some of the faults and failings pertaining to the age in which they lived, but 
(as history conclusively shows) not in so large a measure as their contempo- 
raries in other lands. What an exhaustless mine of history and romance do the 
annals of New England offer to the prose writer and the poet. What hitherto 
almost unexplored fields lie open on every side. Our great epic peom and our 
great historical novel has yet to be written. And then it is of great im- 
portance in the development of our country, in the combining and harmonizing 
of the various elements that go to the making of it and the dill'erent interests 
involved therein, that the New England idea, the Ncav England spirit (the logi- 
cal outgrowth of the spirit of Old England) be thoroughly taught and understood, 
so that it may continue to be the moulding and shaping force in the future that 
it has been in the past. The New England ideal has ever been marked by a firm 
adherenee to truth and duty, by a splendid faitli and trust in God. And men 
and women of New England descent have largely assisted in opening up and 
making fruitful different sections of our country, have assisted in developing 



228 Booh Notices. [April, 

In a large way and on a grand scale the thought and action of our people, 
and have ever carried with them the good old English principles of steadfast- 
ness and tenacity "which have made our race the dominant one wherever it has 
planted itself. No race of modern times has had and exercised such a genius 
for government, for Implanting and nurturing principles of liberty (not license), 
for contributing to the onward inarch of human progress. And it may be 
that our Republic with its written constitution will be a surer anchorage, a 
more lasting home than even Old England for the principles of true liberty, 
for all that stands for English thought and life, for all our grand heritage from 
the mother-land; a heritage forever assured as long as all English-speaking 
peoples stand true to the traditions of our race. 
By Rev. Daniel Rollins, of Woodsville, N. II. 

Concord, Massachusetts. Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1635-1850. Printed 

for the Town. Royal 8vo. pp. vii. -f- 496. Price $5. 

At the annual meeting of the town of Concord, March 30, 1891, a committee 
was appointed consisting of five members, of which the late Rev. Grindall Rey- 
nolds, D.D., was chairman, to "procure the printing of the town's ancient 
registers of births, marriages and deaths." The committee have performed 
their duties in a very satisfactory manner, and the noble volume before us is 
the result of their labors. Concord was settled in 1G35, and only a few towns 
in New England go back to an earlier elate. The committee in their preface 
say: " It has been termed with truth one of the 'seed towns.' The descend- 
ants of the original settlers are scattered far and wide over the whole country. 
It is probable that the number of such descendants living outside of the town 
far exceeds the number of those living in it at the present time." The preface 
says also: "All the members of the committee appointed by the town have 
given much interest and a good deal of general supervision to the work ; but it 
is simple justice to say that the great burden of investigation and labor has 
fallen upon Mr. George Tolman, one of the committee. lie has given unremit- 
ting care and a very large portion of his time to the preparation of the book. 
He has sought in every direction for information which might cast side light 
upon the Town Records themselves. If the book shall prove to have the merits 
thai such a book ought to have, a full measure of credit should be given to Mr. 
Tolnnui." 

The volume before us is a model for those who have the charge of printing 
the records of a town. We commend the indexes particularly to their atten- 
tion. By indicating whether the record indexed is of a birth, marriage, death, 
or other item, much time is saved to the reader. 

The Public Records of the State of Connecticut, from October, 177 G, to February, 
1778, inclusive. With the. Journal of the Council of Safety, from October 11, 
1776, to May 0, 1778, inclusive, and an Appendix. Published in accordance 
with a resolution of the General Assembly, by Ciiaki.es J. IIoadly, LL.D., 
Slate Librarian. Hartford: Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Com- 
pany. 1891. Royal 8vo. pp. iv.-f658. 

The State of Connecticut has previously published the Records of the Colony 
in fifteen volumes, from 1G3G to 1773, and the Records of the Jurisdiction 
of New Haven in two volumes, from 1G38 to its union with Connecticut in 
1GG5. Of these volumes, volumes 1, 2 and 3 of the Records of the Colony of 
Connecticut were edited by Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull. The other fourteen 
volumes have been edited by the present editor, Dr. IIoadly, whose work on 
these volumes extends through a third of a century. They are a monument to 
his literary and antiquarian attainments. 

Having completed the editing and publishing of the Records of the Colony, 
he has taken up the Records of the State, and the first volume is before us. 
1 he resolution of the General Assembly of Connecticut, under which this vol- 
ume is issued, was adopted upon the motion of the Connecticut Society of Sons 
of the Revolution, and approved Eebruary 25, 1893. The work has been edited 
in the same thorough manner as the volumes previously issued. 

This volume " contains," says Dr. IIoadly in his paper, "about one half of 
the iirst manuscript volume of the ' Records of the State of Connecticut,' and 
all of the first volume of the Journal of the Council of Safety which was not 
printed in the fifteenth volume of the ' Colonial Records of Connecticut.' The 
Journal of the Governor and Council, as distinguished from that of the Council 



1895.] Booh Notices. 229 

of Safety, is supposed to be lost. . . . It is not known that the journals 
either of the Upper or of the Lower House of the General Assembly for the 
period covered by this volume are in existence." 

The book shows the same learning and judgment as its predecessors. It is 
handsomely printed and is well indexed. 

The Records of the Proprietors of the Narragansett, otherwise called the Fonts 
Record. Rhode Island Colonial Cleanings. Volume I. By James N. Arnold, 
Providence, II. I. : Narragansett Historical Publishing Company. 1894. 
8vo. pp. ix.-f-199. Price $1.50. 

Mr. Arnold, whose " Vital Statistics of Rhode Island," in six large quarto 
volumes, have been noticed by us as the volumes appeared, lias begun a " Sup- 
plement" to that work under. the title of " Rhode Inland Gleanings." The 
first volume, now before us, is devoted to what are known as the " Pones Rec- 
ords," consisting of the records of the Narragansett Proprietors. Mr. Arnold 
has done a good work in preserving these historic land records in print. 
The importance of these records, the editor states, require that they should be 
edited, hut circumstances induce him to print them in their present form, and 
at some future time to publish a volume of notes, explanatory, historical and 
critical, illustrating these records, lie will be obliged to those having docu- 
ments or facts illustrating the work to communicate them to him. Other vol- 
umes of the " Colonial Gleanings" arc in preparation. 

Suffolk Manorial Families, being the County Visitations and other Pedigrees-. 
Edited, with Extensive Additions, by Joseph James Muskett. Privately 
Printed. Exeter : William Pollard & Co., Printers. 1891. Price to sub- 
scribers, 5s. a part. Address the Editor, care of J. Muskett Yetts, Esq., 5G 
Lincoln's Inn Pields, London. 

The first part of this valuable serial was noticed by us in July last. The 
object of the editor is to make it an exhaustive resume of the Genealogy of 
Suffolk, England. The present part contains pedigrees of Sharpe of Islington, 
Mildmay of Essex, Alabaster of Hadleigh, Vesey of Hintlesham, Risby of 
Thorpe Morieux, Still of Hadleigh, Browne of Edwardstone, and other families. 
The Pedigrees are generally accompanied by wills, inquisitions and other docu- 
ments. Much genealogical matter of interest to New England families will be 
found in these numbers, and we hope the work will find many subscribers in this 
country. We commend it to the attention of the librarians of public libraries- 
Part V. will contain the ancestry of Rev. George Burrough,. the victim of the 
"witchcraft delusion of 1G92. Mr. Muskett writes that he would gladly give a 
page to the descendents of Isaiah Thomas, the founder of the American Anti- 
quarian Society, or other descendants of George Burrough, if authentic infor- 
mation were furnished him. 

Massacre of Wyoming. The Acts of Congress for the Defence of the Wyoming 
Valley, Pennsylvania, 177G-177S. With the Petitions of the Sufferers of the 
Massacre of July 3, 177S, for Congressional Aid. With an introductory 
Chapter by Rev. Horace Edwin Hayden, M.A., Corresponding Secretary of 
the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society. Printed for the Society, 
Wilkes-Barrc', Pa. 1895. 8vo. pp. xxiv.-H>5. 

This pamphlet is issued by the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society- 
It contains, as the title-page shows, a collection of documents and facts relative to 
the Massacre at Wyoming, July 3, 1778. The Society has done well to collect 
and preserve in print a full history of this tragic event. The introductory chap- 
ter by the Rev. Mr. Hayden adds much to the value of the collection. The 
reader will Unci here fuller material than any other work contains. 

The Fast and Thanksgiving Pays of Xcw England. By W. He Loss Love, Jr., 
Ph.D. Huston and. New York; Houghton, Mi (Ilin & Company. 1895. l2mo. 
pp. (J07. Price, pi. 

This is a much needed work. The author says in his Preface that it '"aims 
to place before you the historical fuels relating to the East and Thanksgiving 
days, which the Fathers of New England have transmitted to their children." 
" Herein," he adds, " you will lind set forth the conditions leading to the adop- 
tion of the Fast and Thaukgiving system in New England in place of the holy 
days. of the Church of England, the circumstances under which it was developed, 
and the reasons for its decline." 

VOU'XLIX. 20* j 


















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230 Book Notices. [April, 

The Author has spent a great amount of research on the subject of this book, 
and 1ms succeeded in throwing light on many points where till now there was 
obscurity. The volume will be found interesting reading as well as indispensa- 
ble for reference. Fifty pages are devoted to a Calendar giving in tabular form 
the year, month, and day, when East and Thanksgiving were observed in New 
Kngland, from 1(520 to 1815, with the state, executive authority and some other 
details. A Bibliography of 81 pages is also given. Facsimiles of several early 
Proclamations are found here. The book is well indexed. 

Representative Men of Connecticut, 1861-1394. Everett, Mass. : Massachusetts 

Publishing' Company. 4to. pp. 400. Full bound in morocco, gilt edges. 

Trice, .$15.00. Address, William E. Moore, Everett, Mass. 

The volume before us contains nearly two hundred biographies of represent- 
ative Men of the State of Connecticut,, most of -which are illustrated with por- 
traits of a high order of merit. It is a valuable addition to American biogra- 
phy and will be found useful to many classes of readers, and should be in all 
our large public libraries, particularly as a reference book. Those who use 
these libraries often wish to obtain reliable information about those who have 
been active in the affairs of the State of Connecticut for the last third of a cen- 
tury. Mr. Moore, the projector and editor of the work, deserves much credit. 

The book is handsomely printed on line paper, and the portraits are of a high 
order. It has an index. 

The Southern Historical Society Papers. Vol. XXII. Edited by II. A. Bkock, 

Secretary of the Southern Historical Society. Richmond, Va. : Published by 

the Society, 1804. 8vo. 

The publications of the Southern Historical Society, of which the twenty-second 
volume is before us, have been frequently commended in the Registers The 
editor, Mr. Brock, has rare qualifications for the oilice of Secretary of the Society 
and for editing the volumes which it issues. His ability, industry and care 
admirably lit him for these positions. His work as editor of this series of volumes, 
winch he has held for a number of years, and as editor of the Collections of the 
Virginia Historical Society, from 1883 to 1892, during which time eleven vol- 
umes were issued filled with valuable historical matter relating to Virginia, 
entitle him to rank as a benefactor of his native State. 

The present volume deserves the same high praise which has been awarded to 
previous volumes. 

Heraldry in America. By Eugene Ziebek. Published by the Department of 

Heraldry of the Bailey, Banks & Biddle Company. Philadelphia. 1895. 

Royal 8vo. pp. 427. Price, in red cloth, $10; handsomely bound in full red 

turkey morocco, gilt edges, $15. 

This book, which appears at a time when Heraldry is receiving more attention 
in this country than formerly, contains a great amount of information on 
Heraldry and kindred subjects. Mr. Zieber says in his Preface : " The book is 
designed to meet a felt want in America for a popular work on heraldry. The 
writer has endeavored to group in a concise and intelligent manner all that is 
necessary to enable the student correctly to interpret and apply the manifold 
laws of the gentle science of Arms. In this respect the book is largely a compil- 
ation, as are all modern works upon the subject. It contains, in addition, a col- 
lection of material — gathered from use of royal and other seals upon Colonial 
documents, and individual armor upon old tombstones, .hatchments, tablets, 
family plate, wills, deeds, etc. — showing an early practice and wide recognition 
of heraldry In America." It is well to state that in colonial times as well as in 
our own, individuals frequently used arms to which they had no right. 

The book does credit to the author, who evidently has bestowed much labor 
upon it. It is embellished with numerous engravings which illustrate the vari- 
ous subjects treated of. It is printed in the best manner, and is well indexed. 

Iterolleclions of Life in Ohio from 2873-1840. By William Coopeu IIowells. 

With an Introduction by his son William Dean IIowells. Cincinnati: The 

Hubert Clarke Company. 8vo. pp. xlv.-f207. Price, $2. 

Mr. William Dean HovvelLs, the well known author, says in his Introduction 
to this book: " It was at my suggestion that my father began, ten or twelve 
years ago, to set down the facts of his early life. At first the record was meant 


















' 





















1895.] 



Book Notices. 231 



for the family only, but when I came to read it over, I found it so full of experi- 
ences and observations of general interest that I urged him to continue it, with 
a view to final publication and yet keep it as simple and informal as he had 
originally intended." Mr. Howells died August 28, 1894, at the age of 87, before 
his work was finished. After his death, his son wrote a conclusion and prepared 
the work for the press. The book will interest those who desire to knoAv what 
sort of life was led in Ohio at that time. "A middle-chiss English family 
coining to Ohio early in the century," says the editor, " could see the primitive 
American life more or less from the outside." 

Collections and Proceedings of (he Maine Historical Society. January, 1895. 

Published for the Society by Brown Thurston Company, Portland, Maine. 

8vo. pp. 112, and index to preceding .volume. Trice $3 a year. 
Publications of the Rhode Island Historical Society, April, 1895. Vol. III., No. 1. 

Providence, K. I. Published by the Society. 8vo. pp. 74, 
The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Published quarterly by the 

Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va. April, 1805. Vol. II., No. 4. 

8vo. pp. 126. Price $5 per annum. Single number $1.50. 
William and Mary College Quarterly. Historical Magazine. Edited by Lyon 

G. Tyler, M. A., William and Mary College, "Williamsburg, Va, January, 

1805. Vol, III., No. 4. 8vo. pp. 76. Price $3 per year. 

We give above the titles of the latest issues of the quarterly publications of 
three of our historical societies and of one college. They preserve much valu- 
able historical matter. The several historical societies print their proceedings 
in their quarterly periodicals. We commend them to historical students in all 
parts of the country. 

Genealogical Sketch of the Ludlam Family from the Early Settlement of Cape 
May County, N. J., 1692. Compiled by Anthony J. Ludlam, November, 
1878. Springfield, 111. : II. W. Ilokker, Printer and Binder. 1878. Royal 
8vo. pp. 10. 

Chronological Record of the English Manns. By J. B. Mann. Rochester, N. Y. : 
E. R. Andrews's Book and Job Printing House. 1874. 

Though these books were printed about twenty years ago, it seems proper to 
notice them in the Register. The Ludlam pamphlet gives the descendants of 
Anthony Ludlam, an early emigrant from England, who settled at Southampton, 
L. I., aw early as 1640. J lis son Joseph removed to Cape May county. 

The Mann book is by Rev. Joseph B.Mann, who died at New Woodstock, N.Y., 
June 1877, aged 28. Mr. George S. Mann, in his " Mann Memorial," calls it " A 
work quite readable and credible in dealing with some of the New York 
branches," But he intimates that in relation to other branches the author is 
frequently in error. 

The Standishes of America. By Mylks Standisii, A.M., M.D. Boston, Mass. : 
Privately printed for the author, by Samuel Usher, 1805. 8vo. pp. viii-4-140. 
A few copies can be obtained of George E. I ittlelleld, 67 Cornhill. Price $3. 

History and Genealagy of Peter Montague of Nansemond and Lancaster Counties, 
Virginia, and his Descendants, 1021-1891. Compiled and published by 
Gkouqk William Mqntaguic. Amherst, Mass.: Press of Carpenter & More- 
house. 1804. 8vo. pp. 401. Price $5. Sold by the author, Amherst, Mass. 

Stephen Lincoln of Oakham, Massachusetts ; his Ancestry and Descendants. Com- 
piled by John Morris, Hartford, Conn. Press of the Case, Lockwood and 
Brainard Company. 1805. 8vo. pp. 100. 

The Descendants of James and William Adams of Londonderry, now Derry, N. IT. 
Compiled by Andrew N. Adams of Pair Haven, Vt. Rutland : The Tuttle 
Company Printers. 1804. 8vo. pp. 87. Price $1. To be obtained of the 
author, Pair Haven, Vt. 

Davidson Genealogical Charts. Large quarto (9 by 12 inches). 

History of the Hamlin Family, with Genealogies, of the Early Settlers of the Name 
iu America, 1039-1894. By H. Pranklin Andrkws. Part One. Exira, 
Iowa. J 801. 8vo. To be published periodically. 

Kelton Family Items. By Dwigiit II. Kelton, LL.D., Montpelier, Vt. 8vo. 
pp. 14. One hundred copies printed. 



232 Booh Notices. [April, 

Account of the Second Annual Gathering of the Bailey-Bailey Association, held 

at Andover, Mass., August 14, 1S94. Bradford, Mass. : Levi C. McKinstry, 

JL'ri ntcr, L894, 8VO. pp. 23. 
Mehclabel Chandler Colt. Her Book, 1714. Bulletin Print. Norwich, Conn. 

1895. 12mo. pp. 19. 
Additions and Corrections to Sumner Genealogy to January 1895. 8vo. pp. 3. 
Supplement No. 2 to the Genealogy of the Family of Gamaliel Gerould. Bristol, 

N. II. Printed by It. W. Musgrove. 1895. 8vo. pp. 17. Price $1. 

We continue in this number our quarterly notices of works relating to gene- 
alogy which have been recently published and presented to this society. 

Dr. Staudish's work, " The Standishes of America," supplies a want long felt. 
Capt. Myles Standish is a prominent figure in New England history, but very 
little has heretofore been printed about his descendants. The author of this 
book, while a student in college, began to collect facts about his ancestry and 
kindred. " The work," he says, '' proved attractive to me, and has occupied a 
generous share of my leisure time for the last twenty-one years." Dr. Standish 
has been very successful in tracing the posterity of his valorous ancestor, and 99 
pages are Idled with the record of those who are known to be his descendants. 
He has appended accounts of other families by the name of Standish in the 
United States and Canada, not a few of whom are supposed to be descend- 
ants of the Mayflower Pilgrim* The book is elegantly printed, and is em- 
bellished with portraits and views. It is well compiled, and has good indexes. 

The book on the Montague family of Virginia is compiled by George William 
Montague of Amherst, Mass., to whom we are indebted for the book on the 
Montagues published in 188G, and noticed by us January, 1887. It is a companion 
volume to that work, and docs for the Virginia Montagues what was done for 
those of New England birth and lineage. It is well printed, and is embellished 
by portraits and other engaavings. It has a good index. 

The next book, on Stephen Lincoln of Oakham, gives his descendants and 
one line of his ancestors, lie was born at Rehoboth, Mass., Dec. 3, 1751, and 
was descended in the sixth generation from Thomas Lincoln, an early settler of 
Hingham, Mass. The book is well compiled and indexed. It makes a handsome 
volume. 

The book on the descendants of James and William Adams contains also 
sketches of the families of Robert Cochran and Joseph Morrison of London- 
derry and of Deacon Thomas Cochran of New Boston, N. II. It is illustrated 
by portraits, and a map of a portion of Rockingham county. It will be found 
useful to those whose kindred are here preserved. 

The Davidson Genealogical Charts consist of cards numbered by letters, 
A, D, E, G, I. They give descendants of William and Mary Davidson, who 
emigrated from the North of Ireland to this country in 1728. The matter is 
arranged in eolumns, a column being given to each generation. Card A was 
issued in ISS7. The work has been discontinued in this form, but the author is 
engaged on a larger work of which the plan will be given in a subsequent issue. 

The work on the Hamlin family is to be issued in numbers. The first number 
contains sketches of the family in Europe, and begins the genealogy of James 
Hamblen of Barnstable, Mass., 1(J39. Iu promises to till a long felt gap in New 
England genealogy. Subscriptions received by the author, Audubon, Iowa. 

The Keltou items by Dr. Kelton of Montpelier, Vt., is devoted to descendants 
of Thomas Kelton, who resided at Boston in 1GG1. Some of his descendants 
Write the name Kilton, and a few Carleton. We hope the author will compile a 
full genealogy of the family. 

The proceedings at the gathering of the Bailey-Bayley Association, to which 
the next, pamphlet is devoted, were quite interesting. We trust that a volume of 
genealogy will he the result of these meetings. 

Mehitable Chandler Colt, from whose papers the genealogical matter in this 
pamphlet is compiled, was a granddaughter of William and Annis (i. e., Agnes) 
Chandler of Roxbury. She was married at Woodstock in 1G95 to John Coit of 
New London. The pamphlet was issued last Christmas, as a loving tribute 
toher memory, by M. l.\ Oilman of Norwich, Ct, and two other descendants 
from her. 

The next pamphlet is by William Sumner Appleton, and consists of Additions 
and Corrections to his "Record of the Descendants of William Sumner," pub- 









. 






i 



1895.] Recent Publications. 233 

lishcd in 1870. Similar pamphlets were issued in January of the following years : 
1881, 1882, 1883, 5886, 1890 and 1892. 

There have been two supplements to the Gcrould Genealogy by Rev. Samuel 
L. Gerould, then of Goustown, now of llollls, N. IT., the first in 1890 and the 
pamphlet before us in January last. This work was printed at the charge of 
Henry Gerould, M.D., of Cleveland, Ohio. 



RECENT PUBLICATIONS, 

Presented to the New-England Historic Genealogical Society from December 

1, 1894, to March 1. 1895. 

Prepared by the Assistant Librarian. 

I. Publications written or edited by Members of the Society. 

Memoir of Frederick Lothrop Ames. By Leverctt Saltonstall. Reprinted 
from the publications of The Colonial Society of Massachusetts. Vol. I. Bos- 
ton. 1894. 4to. pp. 9. 

Supplement to the History of Taunton, T Mass. By Samuel Hopkins Emery, 
D.l). Syracuse. 1894. 8vo. pp. 13. 

Reminiscences of Foreign Travel. A Fragment of Autobiography. By 
Robert C. Winthrop, LL.D. Privately printed. 1894. 8vo. pp. 104. 

Brown University Alumni of Fall Riv^er, Mass. Paper read by Hon. John S. 
Brayton, LL.D., before the Association of the Sons of Brown University in 
Fall River and vicinity, Feb. 10, 1888. 12mo. pp. 23. 

Historic Rehoboth. Record of the Dedication of Memorial Hall, May 10, 1886. 
Attleborough. 188G. 12mo. pp. 130. 

Proceedings and Addresses at the Dedication of the Town Hall in Swansea, 
Mass. Fall River. 1892. 12mo. pp. 80. 

A report of the Record Commissioners of the city of Boston, containing Bos- 
ton births from A.D. 1700 to A.I). 1800. Boston. 1894. 8vo. pp. 379. 

Suffolk Deeds. Liber VII. Boston: Rockwell & Churchill, City Printers. 

1894. 8vo. pp. 179. 

Seventh Report of the Custody and Conditions of the Public Records of the 
Parishes, Towns and Counties. By Robert T. Swan, Commissioner. Boston. 

1895. 8vo. pp. 39. 

An Alphabetical Abstract of the Record of Deaths in the Town of Dedham, 
Mass., 1814-1890. Compiled by Don Gleason Hill, LL.B., Town Clerk. Ded- 
ham, Mass. 1895. 8vo. pp. ix-f-217. 

Memorial Biographies of the New-England Historic Genealogical Society. 
Vol. V. 1862-1864. Boston. 1894. 8vo. pp. 507. 

Catalogue of the first two hundred volumes purchased by the trustees of the 
Kidder fund, for the New-England Historic Genealogical Society. Boston. 
1894. 8vo. pp. 12. 

Rev. John Wheeler, D. D., 1798-1862. President of the University of Ver- 
mont, 1833-1848. A Biographical Sketch by Rev. Ezra; H. Byington, D.D. 
Cambridge. 1894. 12mo. pp. 20. 

Michael Wigglesworth, the earliest poet among Harvard graduates, with some 
Bibliographical Notes on his Day of Doom. By Samuel A. Green, M.D. 
8vo. pp. 7. 

Certain Grants of Land made in the year 1684, now within the limits of Nashua, 
N. II. By Samuel A. Green, M.D. 8vo. pp. 5. 

Memoir of Charles Henry Bell, LL.D, By Rev. Edmund F. Slafter, D.D. 
Boston. 1895. 8vo. pp. 21. 

The Town History. By Rev. Anson Titus. Boston. 1895. 8vo. pp. 4. 

II. Other Publications. 

King's County Genealogical Club Collection. Vol. I. Nos. V. and VI. New 
York.' 1894. 8vo. pp. 96. 

Essex County Historical and Genealogical Register. Vol. I. No. 12. Ips- 
wich, Mass. 1894. 8vo. pp. 14. 

The Connecticut Quarterly. An illustrated magazine, devoted to the Litera- 
ture, History and Picturesque Features of Connecticut. Vol.1. No. 1. Hart- 
ford. U895. 



234 Recent Publications. [April, 

The Monthly Bugle. Published by the Maine Association. Rockland, Me. 
18M. Hvo. pp. 8. 

Colonial Life in Rutland. Address of Burton W. Porter, Esq., in the Con- 
gregational Church in Rutland, Mass., August 14, 1894. Worcester. 1894. 
8vo. pp. l(i. 

Heraldry in America. By Eugene Zieber. Philadelphia. 1895. 4to. pp. 427. 

Old Hartford Burying Ground. By George Leon Walker, M.D. Hartford. 
1895. 8vo. pp. 32. 

Mehitable Chandler Coit. Her book, 1714. Norwich. 1895. 12mo.pp. 19. 

Kelton Family Items. By Dwight II. Keltou, LL.D., of Montpelier, Vt. 
1895. 8vo. pp. 14. 

Index to the Genealogy of the Massachusetts and Dover, N. H., Stiles fami- 
lies. By Mrs. Mary Stiles (Paul) Guild. 1892. Small 4to. pp. 35. 

Biographical Sketches of the Governor, Councilors and members of the 
Senate and House of Representatives of the New Hampshire Legislature for 
1895-G. Compiled by II. B. Brown. Vol. VIII. Concord, N. H. 1895. 
Price 25 cents. 8vo. pp. G2. 

Influence of the Bar in our State and Federal Government. Annual address 
before the Southern New Hampshire Bar Association, Feb. 23, 1894. By Hon. 
J. 11. Benton, Jr. Boston. 1894. 8vo. pp. 03. 

Historical Sketch of the Second Churcn in Boston. Compiled by George H. 
Eager. Boston: Press of Robinson Printing Company. 1894. lGmo. pp. 43. 

London and the Kingdom. By Reginald R. Sharpe, D. C. L. Vols. I. and II. 
London. 1894. 12mo. pp. xv.-j-5GG and xi.+^50. 

An Historical and Descriptive Account of the Field Columbian Museum. 
Chicago. 1894. 8vo. pp. 91. 

The Indians of New York. By Hon. Elliot Danforth. 8vo. pp. 52. 

The Varieties of the Human Species. Principles and Methods of Classifica- 
tion. By Giuseppe Sergi. Washington. 1894. 8vo. pp. Gl. 

Eleventh Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution, 1889-90. By J. W. Powell. Washington. 1894. 
4to. pp. xiii.-f-553. 

Twelfth Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology to the Secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution, 1890-91. By J. W. Powell. Washington. 1894. 4to. 
pp. xviii.-f-742. 

A Bibliography of Aceto Acetic Ester and its Derivatives. By Paul H. Sey- 
mour. Washington. 1894. 8vo. pp. 148. 

Contributions to North American Ethnology. Vol. IX. Washington. 1893. 
4to. pp. 232. 

An Ancient Quarry in Indian Territory. By William Henry Holmes. Wash- 
ington. 1894. 8vo. pp. 19. 

Smithsonian Geographical Tables. Prepared by R. I. Woodward, Washing- 
ton. 1S91. Svo. pp. cv.~f-182. 

The Ainlsh Mennonltes. A Sketch of their Origin and of their Settlement in 
Iowa, with their Creed. By Barthinius L. Wick, A.M. Iowa City. 1894. 
Svo. pp. GO. 

List of Publications of the Bureau of Ethnology. By Frederick Webb Hodge. 
Washington. 1894. 8vo. pp. 25. 

Town of Weston. Records of the Town Clerk, 1804-182G. Boston : Alfred 
Mudge & Son, printers. 1894. 8vo. pp. 437. 

Concord Town Records, 1732-1820. Printed by authority of joint resolu- 
tions, passed by the City Council April 9, 1889, and February 13, 1894. Con- 
cord, N. II. The Republican Press Association. 1894. 8vo. pp. 57G. 

Index to the Journals of the House of Representatives, Province of New 
Hampshire, 1711-1775. Published by authority of the Legislature. Manches- 
ter, N. II. 1890. 8vo. pp. 109. 

Index to the Journals of the House of Representatives, Province of New 
Hampshire, from April 21, 1775, to April 17, 1784. Published by authority of 
the Legislature. Concord. 1894. Svo. pp. 503. 

The Early Records of the Town of Providence. Vol. VII. Providence. 
1891. pp. 2G1. 

Third Inaugural Address of Hon. Henry A. Marsh, Mayor of the City of 
Worcester, Muss. Worcester. 1895. 12mo. pp. 20. 

Reports of the Board of Selectmen, Town Treasurer, and Board of School 
Visitors of the Town of Middletown, from Sept. 1, 1892, to Sept. 1, 1893. Mid- 
dletowil. 1893. Svo. pp. 62. 



1895.] Recent Publications. 235 

Roports of the Town Officers of the Town of Lexington, for the year 1894. 
Boston. 1895. 12mo. pp. 1(34. 

The Annual Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the Town of Ando- 
ver for 1894. Andover, 1895. 8vo. pp. 19. 

Annual Reports of the Historical and Philosophical Society of Ohio, for 1894. 
Cincinnati. 1894. 8vo. pp. 16. 

Transactions of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society for the year 1894. 
Boston. 1894. 8yo. pp. 201. 

Missouri Historical Society, President's Address, Constitution and By-Laws 
and List of Members, June (>, 1891. 8vo. pp. 31. 

Abstract of the Ninth Biennial Report of the Kansas Historical Society, 
containing a list of Kansas newspapers. Top'eka. 1894. 8vo. pp. 24. 

Seventh Annual Meeting of the Hartford Board of Trade. Hartford. 1895. 
I2ino. pp.. 33. 

Twenty-ninth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Winchester 
Home for Aged Women. Boston. 1895. 12mo. pp. 31. 

Twenty-sixth Annual Report of the Children's Hospital. Boston. 1895. 
8vo. pp. 48. 

InMemoriam. Joseph Kirkland. Chicago Literary Club. 1894. 12mo. pp. 8. 

In Memoriam. William Emerson Strong. Chicago Literary Club. 1894. 
12mo. pp. 8. 

In Memoriam, Thomas Foster Wlthrow. Chicago Literary Club. 12ino. pp.9. 

In Memorlani. Henry Field. Chicago Literary Club. 12mo. pp. 7. 

In Meinoriain. George 1 lowland. Chicago Literary Club. 12ino. pp. 10. 

In Memoriam. David Swing. Chicago Literary Club. 1894. 12ino. pp. 20. 

In Memoriam. John Wellborn Root. Chicago Literary Club. 12mo. pp. 6. 

In Memoriam. Samuel Bliss. Chicago Literary Club. 12mo. pp. 7. 

In Memoriam. William Frederick Poole. Chicago ^Literary Club. 1894. 
12mo. pp. 42. 

In Memoriam. Hosmer A. Johnson. Chicago Literary Club. 12mo. pp. 8. 

The Life of John Patterson, Major-Goneral in the Revolutionary Army. By 
Thomas Egleston, LL.l). New York. 1894. 8vo. pp. ix.-f293. 

George Huntington Williams. The Minutes of a Commemorative Meeting 
held Oct. 14, 1894. Baltimore. 1894. 12mo. pp. 19. 

Tributes to the Memory of Robert C. Winthrop, by the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, December 13, 1894. Boston. Published by the Society. 1894. 
8vo. pp. 40. 

Memorial of Abiel Abbot Livermore, D.D. lGmo. pp. 59. 

Catalogue of Yale University CXCV. year, 1894-95. New Haven. 1894. 
12mo. pi>. 418. 

Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer of Harvard College, 1893-94. 
Cambridge. 1S95. 8vo. pp. G9. 

Catalogue of Amherst College for the year 1894-95. Amherst. 1894. 8vo. 
pp. 73. 

Catalogue of the College of New Jersey at Princeton. One hundred and forty- 
eighth year, 1894-95. Princeton Press. 12mo. pp. 219. 

The Seventy-lifth Annual Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Colby 
University, 1894-95. Waterville, Me. 1895. 8vo. pp. 78. 

Register of Lehigh University, South Bethlehem, Pa., 1894-95. Bethlehem. 
1894. lGmo. pp. 184. 

Catalogue of Tufts College, 1894-95. Boston. 1895. 12mo, pp. 1G7. 

The Harvard University Catalogue, 1894-95. Cambridge. Published by the 
University. 1894. 12mo. pp. G23. 

Catalogue of the Roxbury Latin School, Boston, Mass., 1894-95. 12mo. 
pp. G2. 

A General Catalogue of the Trustees, Teachers and Students of Lawrence 
Academy, Groton, Mass. Groton. 1893. 8vo. pp. 241. 

An Address delivered at Bowdoin College upon the opening of the Walker 
Art Building, by Martin Brimmer. Boston. 1894. 8vo. pp. 31. 

History of Macedou Academy, 1841-1891. Fairport, N. Y. 12mo. pp. 2G9. 

Address at the Dedication of the Mary Frances Searles Science Building, 
Bowdoin College, Sept. 20, 1894. Brunswick, Me. 1894. 8vo. pp. 44. 

The History of the Class of Sixty-nine, Amherst College, 1889-1894. lGmo. 
pp. 77. 



I 









23G 



Deaths. 



[April, 



Catalogue of Bowdoin College and the Medical School of Maine, 1894-95. 
Brunswick. 1894. 8vo. pp. 72. 

The Pilgrims of Old France, or the Huguenots on the Hudson, 1613-14. New 
York. 1891. 2 4 mo. pp. 32. 



DEATHS. 



Hon. Benjamin Franklin Prescott, of 
Epping, N. II., died at his home in 
that town on Thursday morning, Feb- 
ruary 21, 1895, aged nearly 62 years, 
lie was the only child of Nathan Gove 
Prescott, by his wife Betsey Hills, 
daughter of Capt. Benjamin Richards. 
He was born at the family homestead in 
Epping, Feb. 26, 1833. His boybood 
was spent on the farm, which had been 
in possession of the family for several 
generations. In the fall of 1847 he was 
sent to Blanchard Academy in Pem- 
broke, and in 1860 he entered Phillips 
Academy, Exeter, where he remained 
three years, and then entered Dart- 
mouth College where he was graduated 
in 1856. He studied law with Messrs. 
Henry A. and Abel II. Bellows at Con- 
cord, and was admitted to the bar in 
August 1859, and began the practice of 
his profession in Concord. From May 
1861 to the summer of 1866 he was as- 
sociate editor of the Independent Demo- 
crat, during the absence of Hon. George 
G. Fogg as Minister to Switzerland. 
From 1872 to 1876 he was secretary of 
state, mid in March 1877 he was elected 
governor of the state, and was reelected 
in March 1878. lie was secretary of 
the electoral college of New Hump- 
shire in the years I860, 1861, 1868, 
1872, 1876 and 1880. lie was a dele- 
gate in 1880 to the Republican conven- 
tion at Chicago, which nominated James 
A. Garfield for president of the United 
States, and was chairman of the New 
Hampshire delegation. He had histo- 
rical tastes, and in June 1862 was elected 
a member of the New Hampshire His- 
torical Society, and for many years was 
vice-president of the same. He was 
also a Fellow of the Royal Historical 
Society of Great Britain. 

Gov. Prescott was instrumental in 
procuring about 270 portraits and busts 
for the State of New Hampshire, Dart- 



mouth College, and Phillips Academy 
at Exeter, the New Hampshire His- 
torical Society and other public insti- 
tutions. In 1874, he prepared a list of 
those procured by him up to that date, 
which was printed in the Register 
for October of that year. lie has fur- 
nished us lists for April 1880, July 1885, 
January 1SS9, and for the present num- 
ber. The proof of the last article was 
read by him only a few days before his 
death. See sketches of his life in Suc- 
cessful Men of New Hampshire, page 
281 ; Prescott Memorial, page 567, and 
the Portsmouth Journul, March 2, 1895. 

Mrs. Harriet Louisa Hoadley, widow 
of William II. Hoadley, whom she sur- 
vived nearly 46 years, died at Hartford, 
Conn., Feb. 15, 1895. She was the 
youngest child of Col. Andrew Ilillyer 
(b. June 4, 1743, Y. C. 1770, d. Feb. 2, 
1828), by his second wife Lucy Tudor, 
and b. in East Granby, Conn., July 23, 
1803. Mrs. Hoadley remembered her 
grandfather, Capt. James Ilillyer, b. 
Jan. 19, 1712-13, d. Dec. 6, 1808— the 
two lives covering 182 years. Her g. 
grandfather, James Ilillyer, b. Ap. 14, 
1683, m. Joanna Hayes, d. about Dec. 
1770. His father, James Ilillyer, b. 
July 23, 1644, m. June 28, 1677, Mary 
[Wakefield], \vid. of Ebenezer Dibble, 
Avho was slain in the '« Swamp Fight." 
His father, John Ilillyer, d. July 16, 
1655, was one of the first settlers of 
Windsor. 

Mrs. Hoadley's father was a soldier 
in 1760, and was a sergeant in the fatal 
Havana expedition, 1762, in which also 
her grandfather Tudor participated. He 
was adjutant of the 8th Conn. Regt. at 
the siege of Boston, and rose to be a 
captain. 

Mrs. Hoadley leaves six children. 
Through her grandmother she was 7th 
in descent from Elder William Brewster. 



Ehkata. — Pago 68, line 20, for Charles II., read Richard II. Page 69, line 9, 
for Wareham read Marshani. Page 178, line 10 from bottom, for Zedakiah read 
Zcdekiah. Page 246, under the engraving, for Pye impaling Phippen read 
Phippen impaling Pye. 



1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 237 



GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 

By Henry F. Wateiis, A.M. 
[Continued from page 140.] 

Gidicon Delawne of London Esq., of the age of fourscore and nine 
years, or thereabouts, 19 .June 1654, proved 20 — 1G50. My body to be 
decently buried according to the wisdom of iny executors in the rank of 
an Alderman of London in the Church porch of the Blackfriars, Lon- 
don, under the stone in that place where is written in great letters 
Sepulchrum Launeorum, to the better performance of which solemnity of 
my burial I do hereby order and appoint one thousand pounds to be 
expended therein. My manor of Roxton in the Co. of Bedford I give 
to my grandson William Delawne, son and heir of my deceased son 
Abraham Delawne &c, forever, as it is already settled on him upon his 
contract of marriage, upon condition that such manors, lands &c. in the 
said County as are settled and disposed of for the jointure of Mistress Ann 
Hugessen, the now wife of Master William Hugessen and formerly the wife 
of my said son Abraham, upon his contract of marriage with the said Anne 
by indenture tripartite dated 6 July 1527, made between me, the said 
Gideon Delawne, and Judith my then wife, since deceased, of the first part, 
my said son Abraham Delawne and the said Ann Hugessen, by the name 
of Ann Sonds, one of the daughters of Sir Richard Sonds of ... in 
the Co. of Kent, sithence deceased, of the second part, and the said Sir 
Richard Sonds deceased and Sir George Sonds, son and heir of the said 
Sir Richard Sonds, of the third part, shall be possessed and enjoyed by the 
said Ann Hugessen during her life for her jointure. I give the manor of 
Chersted in Kent to the use &c. of my sr.id grandson William Delawne &c, 
remainder to George Delawne, second son of the said Abraham deceased, 
by the said Anne, then to Michael Delawne, third sou &c, next to Gideon 
Delaune, fourth son &c.^&c. I bequeath my mansion house, with shop, 
garden, round shop and round chamber towards the street, passages, stable, 
hayloft &c. in Blackfriars, to my daughter the Lady Ann Sprignell, the wife 
of Sir Richard Sprignell, baronet, upon, condition that the said William De- 
laune shall have the four chambers next over the dining room in my said 
mansion house, for habitation &c, with free ingress &c. After the decease 
of the said Lady Ann Sprignell I give these premises to my said grandson 
William Delawne and his heirs forever. Other messuages &c. in Black- 
fryers (one occupied by brother Paul Delawne, Doctor in Physick) to my 
said grandson. I give him also my three shares of land in Virginia and 
my two shares of laud in the " Barmoedas or Sommer Islands." I give to 
my grandchildren George, Michael and Gideon Delawne (sons of Abraham) 
five hundred pounds apiece, to be paid to each at his age of twenty and 
one years. To Anne Delawne, the second daughter of my said son Abra- 
ham, four hundred pounds and to Elizabeth Delawne, his youngest daughter, 
three hundred pounds, each at twenty one or day of marriage. To Richard, 
Gideon and William Sprignell, the sons, of the said Sir Richard Sprignell 
and the said Lady Anne, three hundred pounds each at twenty one. To 
Susanna, Elizabeth, Rebecca, Hester and Judith, the daughters of the said 

VOL. XLIX. 21 



238 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Richard and Anne, three hundred pounds each at day of marriage or age of 
twenty one. To Abraham Chamberlaine, the son of my grandchild Mistress 
Chamberlaine, the eldest daughter of my deceased son Abraham and now 
the wife of Master Abraham Chamberlaine the younger, ten pounds to buy 
him a piece of plate whereon it is my desire my arms may be engraven. 
Certain silver vessels to grandson William Delawne. Two thousand pounds 
each to said grandson and to said daughter, the Lady Ann Sprignell. Fifty 
pounds to my brother Peter Delawne, M.D. To my nephew Henry De- 
lawne one hundred pounds, to his wife twenty pounds and to every one of 
his children ten pounds. Bequests to sister Vaucourt and to her children 
Nathaniel Vancourt and Judith Vancourt. To my sister Chamberlaine 
forty shillings to buy her a ring. To sister Katherine Delawne, widow of 
brother Nathaniel Delawne, and her sons Nathaniel, John and Gideon. 
Master Jenkins, minister of St. Ann's Blackfryers and the two ministers of 
the French church. Sundry poor. The Company of the Apothecaries in 
London. My cousin John Mary. Others mentioned. The executors to 
be Lady Ann Sprignell and gi 



be Lady Ann Sprignell and grandson William Delawne. Pell, 380 



Gideon Delawne of St. Anne Blackfryers, London, apothecary, 13 
November lG« r >8, proved 10 January 1G5S. To my loving wife Jane De- 
lawne the lease of the house wherein 1 now live, and all my household 
goods, money, plate &c.j she to have the care and tuition of my daughter 
Anne; and I appoint my said wife sole executrix. Pell, G. 

[Gideon Delaun, apothecary of London and Chersted, Kent, eldest son of 
William Delaune, a French Protestant pastor and doctor in physic. He was 
born in Rheims about 1565, came with his father to England, and was appointed 
apothecary to Anne of Denmark, queen of James I. In 1G10 he was granted the 
arms of the family of Launey of Belmesnil in Normandy, from which he was 
descended. 

lie was a prominent member in the Apothecaries Company, and his fame was 
transmitted to succeeding ages as an originator of a long-famous pill. 

He married Judith, daughter of Henry ChambeiTeine ; his son married Anne, 
■ daughter of Sir Kichard Sandys of Northbourne Court, Kent, Eng. 

W. K. W ATKINS.] 

Daniel Mercer of Loudon, merchant, 22 November 1G87, proved 
12 May 1002. Wife Uebecea. Marriage contract dated 2G May 1G76. 
Sister Elizabeth Dod.son. Sister in law Magdalen, the relict of my de- 
ceased brother Benjamin Mercer. My sister Judith — . My cousins Peter 
Ducane, Christopher Lethieulier and Jacob Foitre. Son Thomas. Lands 
belonging to me in Ireland, for which my honored father, deceased, paid 
about four hundred pounds. The rest of my children. My house at Lime 
street, London, and my house at Peckham, Surrey. My five children 
Thomas, Daniel, Elizabeth, Anne and George Mercer. Brother George 
Dodson Esq. Friend Ralph Fordham. Fane, 90. 

John Priaulx of New Sarum, Wilts, gen 1 ., 10 April 1G95, proved 19 
April 1G98. Houses and lands in Pennington and Milford, Southampton, 
the town of Southampton, and the city of New Sarum. My three daughters, 
Katherine, Ann and Sarah Priaulx. My godson Edmond Naish, son of 
Kdmond Naish. My wife. My sister M rs . Katherine West. My kins- 
woman Mrs. Ann Priaulx. 

In a schedule or codicil, added 12 May 1 G97, others are named. Niece 
Katherine Aderly. Godson John Uovvle. Sister Marchant. Sister 
























'.- 






L 



1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 239 

Lamport. Sister Rowle. Aunt Priaulx. Cousin Ann Priaulx and her 
brothers, my cousins, John and Peter Priaulx. All my nephews and 
nieces. Daughter Katherine married to Edward Stephens, gen t . 

Lort, 106. 

[Other wills relating to this Mercer family of New Hampshire have been 
given in vol. 47 (pp. 510-15) and in vol. 18 (p. 274). I take this occasion to 
correct a typographical error in the footnote on p. 274 (vol. 48). For Mercor 
read Mercer. The will of Mrs. Mary Coquell alias Le Mercier seems to me so 
very interesting and important that I have made a large abstract of it. It 
shows a probable French origin for this family. Hknuy F. Waters.] 

Martin Roberts of Truroo borough within the County of Cornwall, 
merchant, 1 March 1594, proved 5 March 1598. My mother Joan Roberts. 
My father in law John Catcher, alderman, and Ellen his wife. My 
brothers John and Richard Roberts, my sister Philip Robertes, my aunt 
Elizabeth Saundell, my brothers in law John Catcher, Edward Catcher, 
Ambrose Roiston and Thomas Modie, my nephews Richard Roberts, Josias 
Robertes and John Thomas, my cousins William, John and Simons Roberts, 
my brothers in law Martin Thomas,, Roger Tucker, Balthazar Williams, 
John Michell and Henry Nanspian, my sister Anne Tucker and her 
daughter and every of my other sisters, viz. Jane, Elizabeth, Margaret and 
Christabell, and every of their children, as also Jane, my brother Richard's 
daughter, my sister Jane Catcher and my cousin Richard Jeflerie and 
Grace Burges. Wife Ellen. Kidd, 22. 

Serttcntia pro confirmacoe in the matter of the foregoing will was declared 
19 May 1599, the parties in the case being John Roberts a brother and 
Johane Roberts the mother of the deceased, on the one part, and, on the 
other, Ellen Roberts the widow and executrix &c. Kidd, 43. 

JonN Robertes of the town and borough of Trewro, Cornwall, merchant, 
2G April 1603, with a nuncupative codicil, proved 8 February 1G05. To 
my father Ronolde Robertes forty shillings a year for life. To Mary my wife 
twenty pounds a year for life aud twenty pounds a year more so long as she 
doth continue widow and bear my name. My meaning is that she shall have 
but twenty pounds a year if she shall marry, otherwise forty pounds a year. 
Other bequests to her. To John Pendarves my brother in law one signet 
of gold to the value of forty shillings. To my brother William Robertes 
one signet of gold to the value of forty shillings. A similar bequest to 
brother Symon. To my sister in law Jane Robertes one gem of gold to 
the value of twenty shillings. To Mary Robertes my sister in law one 
gem of gold to the value of thirteen shillings four pence. To John Pen- 
darves my godson one hundred pounds. To William the son of Samuel 
Pendarves two hundred pounds (and certain leases). To Robert Pen- 
dervas one hundred pounds. To Grace Borges my sister forty shillings a 
year during her life. To John Roberte my nephew a heifer and a calf. 
To John Borges my godson a heifer and a calf by her side. To the rest 
of Grace Borges' children an ewe and lamb to each of them. To John 
Frye one ewe and lamb. Also I will have one gravestone " to be settle " 
upon the place of my burial, at the charges of my executor. I give ten 
pounds to the end that it may be lent out at (on for a hundred and that the 
use may be given forever at Christmas and Easter to the poor. The rest 
of all my goods and lands and leases 1 give and bequeath unto Grace Pen- 
dervas my daughter and her I make my whole executor. 



240 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

In the codicil lie enlarged his bequests to his wife Mary and sister Grace 
Bruges, gave three of Samuel Pendarve's children three hundred pounds 
and made Samuel Pendarve and Grace his wife joint executors. 

Stafford, 16. 

Thomas Burgks the elder of Truro, Cornwall, merchant, 20 September 
1019, proved 12 December 1G23. To be buried in the chancel of Truro 
church if I be within ten miles of the same at my death. To my wife 
Ilonner Burges her chest with all moneys and Jewells or things in the same 
as was hers at the time of my death, and two large silver bowls and one 
large gilt tankard which- she herself brought in my life time. I give her also 
during her natural life, twenty pounds sterling per annum; and if she re- 
fuse the Duchy land that falleth to her by custom then I give her ten pounds 
per annum more. Other bequests to her. To my son Henry Burges, dur- 
ing his life, ten pounds per annum. If Jane Burges, now wife of my son 
Henry, shall survive her husband then I bequeath to her twenty pounds 
sterling. To my daughter in law Elizabeth Burges, mine executor's wife, 
for a remembrance of nio two of ray best and " valuablest" pieces of plate, 
to be chosen by herself. To my son Humfrey Burges fifty pounds. To 
my son Richard live pounds. To Thomas Burges, the son of my son 
Richard, twenty pounds at one and twenty. To my daughter Ann Trethe- 
wey fifty pounds. To John, Thomas, Richard, Barnard, Margery, Judith, 
Honnor and Joane Trethewey, sons and daughters of Robert Trethewey, ten 
pounds apiece at marriage or age of one and twenty. To my daughter 
Jane Poynter ten pounds. To all my godsons twenty shillings apiece. To 
Josias Burges, at one and twenty, five pounds. To four of the poor of the 
town of Truro two pence apiece to begin the next Sabbath after my death and 
to continue forever. Six shillings eight pence for a sermon to be preached 
the next Sabbath after my burial and so yearly to continue forever; and for 
performance thereof mine executor shall tie the land, by order of law, unto 
the Town aud Borough of Truro for performance thereof. Mine executor 
shall give it himself and after his decease the Mayor of the said Borough. 
My brother in law M 1 . Anthony Pye, my son in law Mr. Robert Trethewey 
and my brother in law Mr. Peter Sidnam shall be the overseers of this my 
last will &Gi, to each of whom I give one gold ring wortli thirty shillings 
apiece posy memento mori. The residue to my eldest son Thomas Burges 
whom 1 make and appoint sole executor &c. Swann, 127. 

[Thomas Burgks, merchant, of Truro, married Honnor, daughter of Hum- 
phrey Sidnian of Tregonie. 

At the Herald's Visitation of Truro, when the city arms were confirmed, i. e. 
October i), 1(520, Thomas Burges was one of the four aldermen, his son, Thomas 
-Jr., was one of the Burgesses, and Hugh Boseawen, mentioned, as will be seen, 
in George I'hippcn's will as a beneficiary and near kinsman to his wife, was 
Recorder of the city. The certificate of the arms and seals was signed by 
the Mayor and Thomas Burges, and two others of the government. Fees, £3 
Us. — George D. Phippen of Salem, Mass.] 

Robert Tuktiiwy, of the parish of St. Stephens in Brannell in the 
County of Cornwall, gen 1 ., 2G November 1(>2«'I, proved 27 April 1024. 
To the poor of the parish ten shillings. To the vicar for tithes forgotten 
ten shillings. To my wife Anne Trethwye my messuages &c. in Trevior 
and Penbegle for the term of fifty years if the lives contained in the original 
lease live so long, with all such " f ucum luce"* as now is in my inner par- 

* I must look upon this strange phrase as a misreading for " furniture." 

Hi:nhy F. Waters. 



1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 241 

]or in Treveor and the best bed whereon I use to lie performed with sheets 
and all other complements thereunto belonging and her own chest and ap- 
parell. John Trethwye my eldest son and heir shall have all my purchased 
land in all places within the County of Cornwall. To my daughter 
Margery two hundred pounds. To my daughter Judith two hundred 
pounds. To my sou Richard the right and term of years, after the decease 
of the said Anne my wife, at Treveor and Penbegle and twenty pounds in 
money. To my son Barnard Trethwy one hundred and fifty pounds. To 
Elizabeth Pye my daughter ten pound?. To my daughter Ilonnor twenty 
pounds. To my daughter Jane ten pounds, with all such right as T have 
in Treneage &c. To my son Thomas the messuages in Eggto shellinges 
(sic), during the continuance of the lease, with the license of drawing and 
selling wine there. Sundry servants. The residue to ray son John whom 
I make executor. And as overseers I do ordain and appoint Anthony Pye 
the elder of Bodinnicke Esq., Anthony Pie my son in law and Henry 
Pownd, to whom I do give for their care and pains therein twenty shillings 
to each of them. 

Sealed, signed and delivered to my son in law Anthony Pie the younger, 
gen 1 ., in trust &c. Byrde, 36. 

[Rohkkt Tkkthewey, will proved 1G24, was son of Richard T. of St. Stephen, 
lie married Anne, daughter of Thomas Burgess of Truro, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Anthony Pye, Gent. 

Robert's children, a large family, are given in a note under his pedigree and 
arms in Visitation of Cornwall, 1G20, pp. 237 and 8, and 30G arms. " Or. a chev. 
Sa. betw. 3 trefoils slipped Az."— G. D. P.] 

TnOMAS Burges of Truroe, Cornwall, merchant, 22 April 1626, with a 
Codicil of the same date, proved 20 June 1626. To the poor of Truro, 
CleiTiee (Clements) and Kenwin forty shillings. To my daughter Honor 
Burgos three hundred pounds sterling, the one half to be paid her at the day 
of her marriage the other half within twelve months after, and in the mean 
time to be maintained by mine executor as shall be fit for her degree. To Anne 
Burges my daughter two hundred pounds (in similar payments). To my 
other two daughters Constance and Isabel Burges eight score pounds apiece 
(paid in similar way). To my sou John two hundred and fifty pounds, to- 
be paid at threo years end after my decease, and my will is that he spend 
those three years abroad in the wars either in the low countries or elsewhere, 
during which three years my will is that mine executor allow him for his 
maintenance twenty marks sterling per annum, payable quarterly. To my 
son Henry my estate and interest in Kenwin Closes and the house, commonly 
called Thomas Glover's house, which I hold of the Borough of Truro. I 
give him also one hundred pounds to be paid him at eight years end &c. 
Provisions for binding him apprentice. To my other six sons, Caleb, Josua, 
Humphrie, James, Klisha and Thomas, to each of them two hundred marks 
sterling, to be paid as they severally accomplish the age of one and twenty, 
and my will is that they be brought up in some honest calling and course 
of life. To my wife Elizabeth forty pounds sterling per annum during her 
life. Other bequests to her (including) one piece of plate called the " bar- 
rell caune." The residue to my son Robert whom I constitute solo execu- 
tor. To my two brothers in law Anthony Pye of St. Stephens in Brannell, 
gen 1 ., and George Phippen, rector of Truro, the manor of Trethosa and 
the barton of Millador in trust to satisfy the legacios &c. 

George Phippen one of the witnesses. Hele, 91. 

VOL. XLIX. 21* 



212 



Genealogical Gleanings in England. 



[April, 




[Thomas Buroes, son of the above, married Elizabeth Pye, 
March 27, 1598. Pedigree and arms of the Barges family is 
given in Visitation of Cornwall, 1620, pp. 2(5 and 303. " Cheqny 
(In. & Or. on a Chief Ar. 3 Cross Crosslets Az." (Same as in 
Phippen Genealogical Chart.) — See Heraldic Journal, vol. 4, 
frontispiece. 

The authors say in a note under the pedigree, p. 20, that 
Thomas Burges was Mem. Pari, from Truro, 1 & 21 of James 
1st, or in 1002 and 1C23. Perhaps this honor may have been 
shared by father and son, both of the same name. Other 
B..r Sefl impaling. Phippen. no tes on the same page gives the baptism of his children, a 
large family, taken from the Truro Parish Records between 1590 and 1010. 

In his will he mentions his brothers-in-law, Anthony Pye and George Phippen, 
rector.— G. D. P.] 

John Trethewey of Truroe, Cornwall, gen*., 20 July 1626, with a 
codicil dated 7 August 1626, another 12 of August 1626, another 14 August 
1626, proved 15 January 1626. To the poor of Truro twenty shillings, to 
the poor of St. Stephen's twenty shillings, to the poor of Clemence ten 
shillings and to the poor of Ken win ten shillings. To my mother Anne 
Trethewey ten pounds sterling. To my brothers and sisters, Elizabeth, 
Margery, Honor, Joane and Barnard, ten pounds sterling apiece (in six 
months after my decease). To my brother Richard thirty pounds sterling. 
To my godson Robert Pye forty shillings. To my goddaughter Joane 
Trethewey twenty shillings. To Joane Trethewey sometime a servant in 
my house twenty shillings. To every child of my brothers and sisters a 
noble apiece. To the boy Hugh Webbe which attendeth on me forty shil- 
lings to bind him apprentice to some honest trade, if it may conveniently 
be done, howsoever to be paid unto him or some friend of his for his good. 
For payment of debts and legacies and the discharge and payment of cer- 
tain debts and legacies of my father Robert Trethewey deceased, not yet 
satisfied, as they shall appear to be due I give and bequeath all the rest 
of my goods, chattells, lands, tenements &c. unto my brother Thomas 
Trethewey, merchant, whom, on this condition, I make and constitute my 
sole executor. If he refuse then I give unto my brother in law Anthony 
Pye of St. Stephens gen 1 , my house, also my land called Riddle and my 
estate in Tregurgas &c., to raise money out of the same sufficient for the 
pay unnit of the said debts and legacies. And that being done all the said 
homes and tenements to bo and remain as the proper estate of the said 
Thomas Trethewey mine executor. 

Wit: Geo. Phippen, Honor Burges. 

In the first codicil he bequeaths co his uncle Richard Burges three 
pounds sterling, to his grandmother Honor Burges thirty shillings to buy 
her a ring, to his aunt Catherine Sidname five shillings and to his aunt 
Bennett two shillings six pence. In the third and last codicil lie ratifies 
and allows of the last will and testament of his sister Judith Trethewey 
deceased. 

George Phippen was a witness to each codicil. Skynner, 2. 

[John Tuictiikwky (will proved 1020) was son of the above Robert, mentions 
the Burgesses and his brother-in-law, Anthony Pye, who married his sister 
Elizabeth; also his aunt Sidnam, which name appears in the Burges pedigree. 
George Phippen and Honor Burges were witnesses to his will. See Vis. Oor- 
wiilVp. 20.— G. .1). P.] .-, 

William Catcher of Truroe, Cornwall, merchant, 13 December 1627, 
proved 26 March 1628. To my wife Margrett there will descend all my 



1805.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 243 

11 Dutchie " land, whereby she will bo provided for. T give and bequeath 
unto her all her wearing apparell and all her rings, Jewells and those trunks 
and chests which she now useth. I give her such household stuff, plate and 
necessary utensils as my brother in law George Phippen shall think fitting 
for her, also, for a testimony of my love, I give her that diamond ring which 
was my own and hath been long in her custody. As for my eldest son 
Edward Catcher, being but young and sickly, if he live unto it the said 
Duchy land will descend unto him, which will be a competent means for him. 
To John, my second son all my leases except that of my now dwelling house, 
which I ordain to be a dwelling house for my wife and all our children 
in common until God shall be pleased otherwise to dispose of them. To 
William, my youngest son, my right and interest in Newington house and 
lands, being copyhold lands, to hold according to the custom of the manor, 
from the time that he shall accomplish the age of twenty four years for- 
ward. Bequests of money &c. to " my seaven " daughters, Constance, 
Matilda, Ellen, Margrett, Jane, Marie and Honor, at days of marriage or 
age of twenty four. My two youngest sons John and William to be joint 
executors. I appoint unto them and the rest, as overseer and guardian, 
my beloved brother in law George Phippen, ratifying and desiring to bo 
ratified what he shall do, who I assure myself will do his best for this my 
family. 

Commission issued to the widow Margaret Catcher during the minorities 
of John and William Catcher &c. Harrington, 26. 

[William Catcher, merchant, who married Margaret Pye, daughter of Anthony 
Pye of St. Stephen's, was an alderman of Truro in 1020. Will, proved 1G2S, 
speaks of his property in Ducliic land and other R. E., and makes bequest to 
his seven daughters, the same whom George Phippen remembers in his will made 
thirty years afterward. He appoints his younger sons, John and William, to be 
executors ; the mother, however, had charge while they were in their minority. 

George Phippen, his brother in law, to be overseer and guardian. 

It was tins man's son, John Catcher, who "pretended" against him, as Mr. 
Phippen says, gave him all his trouble, resulting in his imprisonment, loss of 
property and health.— G. 1). P.] 

John Catcher (intending now a voyage for the Barbados) 23 June 
1G30, proved 16 November 1631. To ny cousin William Challoner a 
bond of two hundred pounds which my cousin John Smith of London, 
leatherseller, and Brian Coole of London standeth bound to pay unto me 
on Michaelmas Day 1 G34 (the sum of one hundred pounds), he giving 
bonds unto my cousin Smith to pay unto my father Thomas Catcher six 
pounds, thirteen shillings eight pence a year for life &c. Reference to 
debts and estates of late uuelo Edward Catcher of Trinity Hall, Cam- 
bridge. To my loving cousin Kdward Catcher, the son of my late uncle 
William Catcher late of Truro, Cornwall, twenty pounds'; and if he die 
beforo my father then the said sum shall remain and be to his two brothers. 
Cousin Smith attorney to receive of my aunt Margaret Catcher, adminis- 
tratrix of my uncle William Catcher for the legacy which my aunt Ursula 
Catcher gave me by her last will and testament &c. and to receive of 
my cousin Richard Mowsdale ten pounds, being part of a legacy of thirty 
pounds given unto me by my lato uncle William Brooke Esq. late of London, 
skinner. St. John, 120. 

[John Catciikk, bound for Parbadoes In 1G30, was the son of Thomas, a 
brother of William.— G. D. P.] 



214 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

GEORGE Fit/ten ah Phippen, 20 July 1G50, proved at London 1 
March 1651 by Mary Phippen, relict and executrix. 

Whereas John Catcher pretending against me an Oxford decree (void 
in itself), during the time of my imprisonment, for mine adhering to the 
Parliament, plundered me in corn and goods of all kinds, according to a 
schedule hereunto annexed, of the value of two hundred and ten pounds 
and seven shillings, for recovery whereof against him and other his agents 
I leave it to mine executrix hereafter named. Item to his sisters which had 
no portions, viz fc : M r William White, for his deceased wife Constance, to 
Margaret, Ellianor, Jane, Mary and Honour, I give and bequeath freely 
all those my lands in Perausand (by me dearly paid for) which were their 
father's; and all this I do for them (God be my witness) not out of 
any check of conscience that I ever wronged that family, for I did supply 
and support them for many years with mine own estate ; so as they have 
spoken against me without a cause for my love they are my adversaries, 
but I give myself unto prayer the good God give them repentance and for- 
give them. Reference made to fifty pounds lent unto M rs Margaret Catcher, 
widow. Item I forgive unto Henry Pye of Stephent, gentleman, all the 
money which he oweth unto me (about one hundred pounds). I forgive unto 
M r . Henry Edmonds and Thomas Drake all the cost in law for a suit begun 
in the consistory of Exon and finished with sentence for me in the Arches. 
I forgive unto the executor or administrator of one Hercules Ash the 
money which he owed me. To M IJ . Mary Woolcott (sheep) — to certain 
servants &c. To Joane Phippen widow (sheep). To Ellinor Phippen, 
now Ellinor George, and Francis George her husband. To my honored 
friend Hugh Boscawen Esq. I give my cabinet press, and unto his honor- 
able lady my clock, and I humbly pray his assistance unto my wife, his 
near kinswoman and to my heirs. To Anne Grosse the daughter of my 
brother in law Edward Gross of Trurow land in Kenwyne street, Somer- 
set, in the tenure of John Rankin and John Daniell. To my kinsman 
and brother's son, Roger Phippen of Penny corn quicke I give that silver 
bowle which was M 1 ' Upoott's if it be not redeemed with fifty shillings 
before my death, and I give unto him my land in Enoder &c, now in the 
tenure of Mary Thomas. 

Item — for my brother David Phippen in Now England I do give and 
bequeath unto his eldest son the lesser Trewoone, unto his second son that 
Trevossa whereon Nicholas Clemowe liveth, unto his third son the other 
Trevossa called Petherickes because it was sometimes in the tenure of one 
William Pethericke &c. ; and if either of these three brothers die without 
issue my will is that that tenement shall descend unto the fourth son, and 
so on ; and to his daughter or daughters twenty pounds. Also to the eldest of 
these brothers I give my signet ring and to the second the silver seal which 
hangeth at my purse. To my sister Cicely Reiguolds my two biggest silver 
spoons, my ring with Death's head unto her husband. To Edmond Braine 
ten pounds and to each of his brothers six pence and to his sister six pence. 
To my kinsman Thomas Phippen of Clemence all my right in a field in 
Kenwyne which I hold of M r Pearce Edgcombe and which William Priske 
holdeth of me from year to year (and other property). 

Item, my prayer is that God would provide some able and faithful min- 
ister to succeed me in Lemoran. Certain legacies to wife Mary and she to 
bo executrix. I desirellugh Boscawen Esq. aforenamed, John Penros Esq. 
and Edward Grosse gentleman to be overseers, and to each forty shillings. 
Reference to jointure promised to wife in marriage (thirty pounds per year). 



1895.] 



Qenealogical (J leanings in England. 



245 



Truly her virtuous and respectful deportment towards me deserves well at 
my hands. To the poor of Weymouth in Dorset five pounds, of Mel combe 
there ten pounds, of Comborne three pounds, of Knoder forty shillings. 
1 pray my brother John Penros to distribute of my moneys twenty pounds 
more unto the poor of twenty parishes, when he shall think iit, twenty 
shillings to each. I give to every of his children twenty shillings apiece. 
Wit: Hugh Boscawen, John Penros, Thomas Harney. Bowyer, 57. 

[Rev. George Fitzpen als Phippen, Hector of St. Mary's Church at Truro, 
will proved in 1651, was the Hon of Robert bHtzpen of Weymouth in Dorset- 
shire, who married Cecelie, .daughter of Thomas .Ionian, 18 September 1580, 
and great grandson of Henry Fitzpeu and Alice Pierce of St. Mary Overy in 
Devonshire. His brothers were Owen and David. Owen was born at Mel- 
comb in 1582; married Annie Coinie 3 July 1003. (Weymouth and Melcomb, 
united by a bridge, were under one government or mayoralty). 

Owen Phippen was a great traveller; he was taken by the Turks in 1020, and 
after seven years bondage, he, with ten other Christian captives under his lead- 
ership, overcame sixty-live Turks in their own ship, which he took to Cartagene, 
sold all for .£0000, returned to England and died at Lamorran, 17 March 1030. 

A tablet was erected to his memory in St. Mary's Church at Truro. See 
Hutchins's History Cornwall, Vol 2; 048. 

David Phippen, from whom the writer of these notes is descended, came to 
New England and was one of thirty persons who began the settlement of Hing- 
ham, September 18, 1035, where sundry lots of land were granted him. He 
removed to Boston in 1641, and died there about 1050. His son, Joseph Phip- 
pen, removed from Boston to Ealmoutn, Casco Bay (Portland) about 1G50, 
thence to Salem in 1005. Joseph's son David, having large landed possessions 
at Casco Bay, remained there till slain (1703) in the Indian and French war. 

George Phippen, A.M., while master of the grammar school in Truro, one of 
the first seminaries of England, furnished and certified to the arms and pedigree 
of his family at the Herald's Visitation of Cornwall in 1020, as given below. 
See Drake and Vivian's Visitation of Co. Cornwall in 1020, published in London 
in 1817, p. 71. Arms, " Argent, two barj, in chief, 3 escallops, sable." 




FITZPEN al's PHIPPEN. 
Arms. — Arg. two bars, in chief three escallops, sable. 
Henry Fitzpen == Alice, da. of 



of St. Mary Ov'y 
in Devon. 



Peirce of Ireland. 



Jo. Fitzpen = 
I 



da. of 



Robt. Fitzpen als Fippen = Cicilie, da. of 



of Wamouth in 
Com. Dorset. 



Thu. Jordon of 
Dorsetsh. 



I 
Owen Fitzpen 
of Ireland 
l 8t sonne. 



David 

2 d sonne. 



George 3 (1 sonne 
of Truro in 
Cornwall 
living 1620. 



Cicilie 
a da. 



Geo: jfiizfr 



24G 



Genealogical Gleanings in England. 



[April, 



The Rev. George Phippen was persecuted for his Puritanic tendencies and his 
adherance to Parliament, being driven from Ins charge of 2<j years duration over 
St. Mary's Church at Truro, and that of Lamorran, a village a few miles dis- 
tant. How long he was imprisoned we know not. In his will he complains 
bitterly, though forgivingly, of his persecutor, who was of his own connec- 
tions, as may be seen in the record of the family of Anthony Pie of St. Stephen, 
who married Constance Pound. This family was of good social position, and 
was probably divided by the bitter party feeling of those troublous times. 
"Arms, Ar. on a fess Az., 3 escallops of the first," — same as on Phippen 
Genealogical Chart. 

William Catcher married Margaret Pie ; these were the parents of John Catcher 
who " pretended" against' Mr. Phippen, notwithstanding he had been guardian 
over his youth. 

Henry Burgess married Jane Pye. 
Thomas Burgess married Elizabeth Pye. 

A son, Anthony Pye, married Elizabeth, daughter of Robt. Trethewey. 
George Phippen married 1st, Joan Pie; 2d, Mrs. Mary Penros, June 20, 1648, 
who survived him. 

Gilbert's His. Cornwall says, that the Pyes with the Spreys 
during the interregnum of Cromwell turned decimators and 
sequestrators upon the lands and revenues of the royal laity 
and clergy of Cornwall to that degree of hurt and damage 
that occasioned the making of that short litany, "From the 
Pyes and Spreys, Good Lord deliver us." 

Joseph Phippen above mentioned, with a forethought not 
common with pioneers, prepared a Genealogical Chart of his 
own and collateral families left in the old country, embla- 
zoned with coat-ax'mor, etc., to which were added later 
generations of the new. 
This chart suffered the loss of some of its tablets during the disturbances of 
the Revolution ; the remnants of which were published in the 4th volume of the 
Heraldic Journal. 

The wills under consideration, obtained through the researches of Mr. H. F. 
Waters, have dropped the enquirer as it were, into the midst of these very 
families, and at times not remote from the period when the English part of that 
chart was prepared. Possibly the compiler was assisted in that portion of the 
collection by his uncle, George Phippen of Truro. Suffice it to say that so much 
has already been brought to light and corroborated regarding these English 
families, that we now place entire conf dence in the ancient record, coat-armor 
and all.— George D. Phippen.] 

Anne Roberts of Woolwich Kent, widow, 4 January 1672. My debts 
and funeral charges discharged I give everything to my loving son in law 
David Phippen, full and sole executor &c. 

Commission issued 20 January 1672 to Anne Phippen wife of David 
Phippen now in the ship called the Revenge, sole executor &c., to admin- 
ister according to the tenor and effect of the will during the absence and 
for the benefit of the said David Phippen. Pye, 11. 




Pye impiling Phlppon 



Mouse Junii Anno 167.1 
Vieesimo primp die end. com Annae Phttpkwny relict. Davidis Phip- 
oveniro in servicio til __ 

Admon. A.B. 1673, fo. 79. 



penny imp do Navo Lo Uovongo in servicio dfii nri Regis def. hentis &c. 



[This David may have been a descendant of Owen Phippen. There were 
several others of the family name, mentioned in the will of George Fitspen, 
probably his cousins nnd sous of his uncles John and George, for the old chart 
nays that "John Fitspen left Issue Robert, .John and George," though the two 
latter iiro not mentioned In the visitation pedigree. fr<*or£6\s sister Cecil la, there 

mentioned, was bap. at Meleomb March 10, 1593, and md Reynolds. — 

O. 1). l\J 


















, 



























1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 247 

Jank Stolion of London, widow, 9 April 1G40, proved 4 May 1647. 
I have settled my lands in May field, Sussex, upon William Hayes of Little 
Horsted, Sussex, gen 4 , and John Maynard of Mayfield, clerk, and Nicholas 
Durant of Ileadlith {sic) and Thomas Turnor of Caginer (676*) in the same 
County, yeoman, and their heirs upon certain trusts, to dispose of the pro- 
fits as by me directed. My daughter Elizabeth Stolion shall have, for life, 
out of the Lodge fields four pounds a year after the death of me and of my 
son Abraham. And all my said lands and the residue of the profits, after 
my death, shall be to the use of my son Abraham and the heirs of his body 
&c, remainder to my son Thomas Stalion and the heirs of his body &c, 
and, for default of such issue,' to the sou and heir of John Edwards late of 
Coekfield, Sussex, gen 1 , and the heirs of his body &c, and for default of 
such issue to my son Thomas Stolion and his heirs for ever. I make my 
son Abraham Stolyon executor and do give him all my personal estate 
which I have in New Pmgland. And I do further give &c. unto ray son 
Thomas Stolyon all my personal estate which I have in Old England. If 
my said son Thomas shall give and secure unto my said daughter Elizabeth 
eight pounds a year (during her life) for her maintenance and support then 
and from thenceforth he shall be freed and discharged of and from all debts 
and demands which I, my executors &c, may or can claim from him. 

Witnesses John White, John Phelpes and James Morgan. 

Proved, at London, by Abraham Stolyon, son and executor. 

Fines, 112. 

Thomas Stolyon of Warbleton, Sussex, gen fc , 10 October 1679. To 
loving wife Susan and to Elizabeth the wife of Samuel Spatchurst of War- 
bleton aforesaid all my utensills and household stuff, to be equall}*" divided 
between them by Richard Weller B.D., rector of Warbleton, and Edward 
Ilawkesworth Esq. of the same parish. To my said wife Susan ten pounds 
yearly for life out of the rents and profits of all my lands in Mayfield, War- 
bleton and Heathfield, in the said County, she to relinquish and release all 
her right, title and dowery and claim to the thirds of my lands. I do de- 
vise and settle all my said lands upon Edward Polhill of Burwash in the 
said County Esq. and Richard Weller and Edward Ilawkesworth &c. as 
ileoffes in trust, for uses hereafter expressed, and if occasion be (for speedy 
payment of debts) to sell rny house in Mayfield town, now in the occupa- 
tion of Samuel Paris and others, and more of my lands. After all debts 
paid then the said Trustees, their heirs and successors shall forever out in 
two or three years put out two poor boys or girls, inhabitants of Warbleton, 
apprentice to some good trades and at the end of their apprenticeship allow 
them a convenient stock for setting up and improving their trades; and also 
once in two or three years to portion out poor maids, inhabitants of War- 
bleton, in marriage. The said Richard Weller and Edward Ilawkesworth, 
whom I appoint executors, to recover and sue for all my just debts which 
are recoverable either in law or equity from the ffeoffees of Henry Smith 
Esq. deceased upon the account of any damage by me sustained &c. and 
also what is due from any other person or persons either in old England or 
in New England. All such debts &c recovered to go towards the payment 
of my debts &c. 

Commission issued 26 November 1680 to Samuel Spatchurst, gen t , John 
Wood Sen 1 " and Samuel Store to administer according to the tenor of the 
will for the use and benefit of the people of Warbleton, for the reason that 
the executors named in the will renounced &c. Bath, 73. 



248 Genealogical Gleaning* in England. [April, 

Sentence for the confirmation of the foregoing will was declared 23 No- 
vember 1 080, the parties in the case being Spatchurst, Wood and Store, 
Trustees for the people of Warbletou, on the one side, and Elizabeth Come, 
natural and lawful sister of the deceased, on the other. Bath, 183. 

[Our eastern friends will recognize the above name which has sometimes 
taken other forms, as Stallian, Stanyan, &c., &c. — II. F. Watkks.] 

Susan Hamore, widow, executrix of the last will and testament of 
Raphe Hamore my late husband &c, 18 February 1616, proved 19 
February 1616. To my brother Jonas Owen one hundred pounds. To 
my sister Sara Snelling the wife of Francis Snelling twenty pounds. To 
Lyonell Barron and Susan Barron, the son and daughter of Christopher 
Barron and my daughter, one hundred pound the piece. Whereas my 
deceased husband gave to Birsaba Snelling, daughter of Francis Snelling, 
three hundred pounds to be paid her at her marriage my will is that imme- 
diately after my decease the said Birsaba shall have the use and benefit of the 
said sum for her maintenance and finding, and for the money to be paid and 
disposed according to the will of my husband. The poor of St. Buttolph's 
Aldgate where my desire is my corpse should be laid near the bodies of 
my father ami mother. The live children of my brother Jonas Owen (at 
twenty one or marriage). I give to Thomas Hamore, Raphe Hamore and 
Jane Blackall, the sons and daughter of my late husband, ten pounds the 
piece. The residue to my daughter Sara Baron, the wife of Christopher 
Baron, whom I make my sole executrix ; and I nominate overseers hereof 
Mr. Richard Stocks preacher and Thomas Kidney citizen and skinner of 
London, to either of whom I give five pounds the piece. Welduii, 10. 

William Pemherton of Rendlesham, Suffolk, Bachelor of Divinity, 22 
October 1598, proved 4 May 1599. To wife Elizabeth all my lands and 
tenements &c. in Suffolk during life and widowhood, she paying to my son 
Richard yearly, till he be one and twenty years old, twenty marks and after 
his said full age twenty pounds towards his maintenance at school and learn- 
ing. After decease of ray said wife I give these lands &c. to my said son 
Richard. I give to Richard all my books, notes and writings. If wife die 
before Richard is of full age then I give out of said lands &c. one hundred 
marks to be paid by him, that is, twenty marks yearly for five years to my 
son Mathie, beginning two years after her decease. And for default of 
such payment, upon lawful demand &c, I give to said Mathie all my lands, 
free and bond, lying in Tunstall. If wife take another husband sou Richard 
shall, upon her marriage, enter my lands presently, and then I give her, iu 
lieu of her thirds, an annuity of twenty pounds. 

I give to my sons Joseph, Benjamin and Paul, at their several ages of 
one and twenty years, one bundled marks each; and to my two daughters 
Seholastice and Anno one hundred marks each, to be paid at their like ages 
or davs of marriage. Wife Elizabeth and son Richard to be executors. 

Kidd, 42. 

Paul Pemberton citizen and haberdasher of London, 23 July 1625, 
proved 27 September 1 625. The poor of Stebbing. The poor of St. 
Michael's Crooked Lane. The poor of Mr. Stock's church in Bred Street. 
Ten pounds to bo equally divided Unto those men unto whom my brother 
Benjamin was indebted, according unto their several debts. Ten pounds 
towards the building np of Mr Stock's church, it being now pulled down. 









i 

■ 















1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 249 

Twenty pounds to my brother Mr Carter. Twenty pounds to my brother 
Joseph Pemberton. My brother Mathias Pemberton and his daughter 
Elizabeth and his other two children. My brother Benjamin's two 
children Elizabeth and Joseph. I leave twenty pounds in my execu- 
tor's hands for to pay twenty shillings yearly for twenty years to come 
upon the fifth day of November for a sermon to be preached in the after- 
noon by the parson of St. Michael Church in Crooked Lane in London ia 
a remembrance of God's great mercy unto our nation as on that day in de- 
livering us from so great a u daunger" as on that day we were subject unto. 
Five pounds more to pay five shillings yearly for twenty years to come, to be 
given in bread to the poor of' St. Michael &c. upon the fifth of November 
as aforesaid, at night after the sermon is ended. Twelve pounds to twelve 
poor ministers, to be given by my brother Joseph and my brother Mathias 
as they shall see where is most need. My mother Mary Whiskett of Nor- 
wich widow. Cox Tooke ironmonger, his wife and children. To Ellen 
Tucker, widow, a bond of twenty pounds that Mr Allen of Ipswich standeth 
bound for, the truth is it is her money and not mine. To my brother Mr 
John Fuller forty shillings to make a couple of rings, one for himself and 
another for his wife, to wear them for my sake. Elizabeth Pemberton the 
daughter of Mathias. To brother Joseph half my books and the other half 
I will Mathias may have. Item, I give my twenty pounds adventured into 
New England unto the Company to be employed by them towards the 
foundation of a church if ever God give them a settled peace there. The 
residue to brother Joseph whom with my brother Mathias I make my 
executors &c. Clarke, 100. 

Phippen (mite, p. 242, 246): 

Notk : The illustration on page 242 for the arms of Burges of Cornwall, 
loaned by Mr. Phippen, is incorrectly drawn; and that on page 24G should be 
described as " Phippen impaling Pye." Committee on Heraldry. 

Dame Anne Moulson (ante, vol. 48, page 405). 
The Moulson Coat of Arms. 

In addition to what has already been gleaned in England regarding Sir Thomas 
Moulson and his wife Dame Anne (Radcliffe) Moulson, Dr. Marshall, Rouge 
Croix Pursuivant, kindly contributes the following : 

" ' The arms and crest of Mr. John Moulson of Hargrave Stubs, in the Co. of 
Chester, and of Mr. Thomas Moulson of Loudon his brother, being truly descended 
from the co-heirs of Rosengrave, Oreby and Hargrave — exemplified by Wra. 
Camden, Clarenceux King of Arms.' The arms are taken from the original, 
which was then in custody of Mr. ' Thorn? s Moulson, nephew and heir of Sir 
Thomas Moulson, Knight, Alderman of London, and are quarterly: 

1. Gules a chevron argent frette sable between three mullets or (for Moulson). 

2. Or a fess wavy and in chief three martlets sable (for Rosengrave). 
U. Grilles two lions passant argent, in chief a label or (for Oreby). 

4. Argent a grillln segreaut per fess gules and azure (for Hargrave). 

Crest — A griflin passant per pale gules and azure, resting the dexter fore-claw 
or a mullet or." 

Dr. Marshall adds : " Argent two bends engrailed sable are the arms of the 
Radeliffes of Ordsall, from which family Anthony (father of Anne) Radcliffe 
descended." . Henry E. Woods. 

John Woodbury of Beverley in New England, mariner, but now resident 
on board his Majesty's ship the Crown, 4 August 1G72. I give to my well 
beloved friend Mr Daniel Berry of Limehouse, Stepney, all my moneys, or 
wages as shall be due for my service or wages in the ship Crown, but to the 
intent and purpose to pay and satisfy all such just and due debts as. are 
vol. xlix. 22 









' ■ 















250 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

owing unto him the said Mr Berry and to any other person to whom I shall 
justly stand indebted unto; and, for the remainder of the moneys it is my 
will that my wife shall have and enjoy and to be sent her by the first op- 
portunity into New England, which I desire Mr Berry to procure safe con- 
veyance of the same. I give and bequeath unto my said wife Elizabeth 
Woodbury all my books and sea instruments which I have now in my chest 
and also a new cloth coat, which, my will is, may be also sent to my wife with 
the first and safest conveyance; or that, if the said Mr Berry shall think 
convenient, to sell or dispose to sale all or any part of books, instruments 
or coat and to make return of the product of them unto my wife in money 
or goods. To my friend John Tayler mariner, one of the said ship's com- 
pany, all my wearing apparell &c. 

Commission issued to Daniel Berry 18 January 1672 to administer &c. 
•no executor having been named. Pye? 13. 

William Traiieune of St. Clement Danes, Middlesex, chandler, 29 
April 1658, proved 24 June 1 G58. Wife Dorothy. To my grandchild 
William Haisman fifty pounds (he under 16 years of age). The next child 
of my daughter Ellenor Haisman. To my brother Richard Traherne now 
.in Virginia ten shillings. The residue to Henry Haisman and Ellinor his 
now wife whom I make executors. 

Proved by Henry Haisman, power reserved to Elianor Haisman. 

Wootton, 296. 

Elizabetii Slaughter, 5 August, 1645. Am now fallen into a time 
of great " mortallitie." I now in perfect health. I do appoint that my 
true natural son William Clarke, son to my first husband Henry Clarke, 
shall have and enjoy all that I have if ho be living and shall come to de- 
mand it within the term of seven years aftor my decease, excepting some 
• certain things hereafter specified, which aro these. I do give to my sister 
Francis, wife to William Gilbert, one pair of fince (sic) laced pillowbeers. 
To my cousin Elizabeth Elliott one flaxen table cloth. To my cousin Mary 
King one little cabinet. The rest of my household stuff equally to my 
cousins Mary and Rachel Cullom, daughters to my sister Jane Cullom, 
except one feather bed and boulstor which I appoint for my son William if 
he come to demand it as aforesaid. If I die before the return of Isaac 
Walker from New England 1 give to my cousin Mary Cullome, before- 
named, full power to recover and receive fifty shillings due to me from the 
said Isaac Waker (sic) for her own use, whether my son come or not; but 
in case she die before she be married I then appoint the said fifty shillings 
for her brother Robert Collom. 

Now if my son William Clarke come not after my decease within the 
time limited or if otherwise by good and sufficient testimony it may be 
proved that he be dead then I appoint such moneys or goods that by virtue 
hereof appertaineth to him, the third part I give to the said Mary Cullome, 
the rest to be equally divided between my sister Sibbill Howell's children 
and my sister Francis children and my sister Jane Cullom's children. To 
the poor of the parish where I shall be buried five shillings. And that this 
my said will may be faithfully fulfilled I do desire to entrust herein my 
brother Arthur King, my brother Joshua Slaughter and my brother Robert 
Cullom, to whom I give at my decease five shillings apiece. Witnessed by 
John Saniford and Mary Hart. 

Commission issued 20 Juno 1646 to Robert Culme, one of the trustees, 
to administer according to the tenor of the will. Twisse, 83. 



1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 251 

In the probate Act Book for 1G46 the diocese of Bristol is indicated, but 
no parish. 

Matthias Niciiolls, preacher of God's word to the town of Plymouth, 
Devon (without date) proved 10 October 1G31. To the Governors of the 
New Hospital, called the poor's portion, ten pounds. To the Governors of 
the Hospital adjoining, called orphans' aid, five pounds. I give three 
pounds to be distributed among the poor of Plymouth. To the poor of 
the town of Buckingham forty shillings. Likewise I give unto the Com- 
mon Stock for New England, towards the advancement of that plantation, 
the sum of thirteen pounds. My land in Plymton Mary parish I give to 
my beloved wife, during her natural life, and after her decease to my son &c, 
remainder to son Matthias &c, next to son Samuel &c, then to daughters 
Johan and llanna and their heirs forever. To daughter Johan fifty pounds, 
to be put into the hands of some trusty friend to be employed for her ad- 
vantage (and the remainder of certain' lease) she to receive her stock at the 
age of twenty and one years or day of marriage. A similar bequest to 
daughter Iianna. To my two younger sons Mathias and Samuel one hun- 
dred marks apiece, at one and twenty. The residue of my goods &c. to my 
wife whom I make and constitute sole executrix. Reference to the lease of 
the new market house of the town, intrusted to beloved friends Mr. Robert 
Trelawny, Mr. Edmond Fowell and Mr. Richard Tapper, and " the two 
leases bought for mee by M r Jope jf M rl8 Parker and her sonne." My 
desire is that my wife will reserve such of my books as shall be thought 
useful for my son John until he be fit to make use of them. And herein 
my desire is that she use the advice of my dear friend Mr. John Vincent 
who will, I doubt not, easo her of a great part of her care in his education. 
As for my papers and notes 1 commit them wholly to the disposing of the said 
M r . Vincent, my dear brother Mr. Ferdinando Nicolls and my beloved cousin 
Mr. Abraham Sherwill, desiring them to set apart such as they shall think 
useful either for the public good of the Church or for the furthering of my 
son John in his particular studies and to burn the rest &c. My cousin 
Abraham Sherwill to choose out of my best English books for his father, 
mother, wife, her brother and sister, each of them one such as he shall 
think most convenient for them as tokens of my love. 

Proved by Martha Nicholls, widov, &c. St. John, 107. 

William Pittes, of the parish cf Temple within the city of Bristol, 
clothier, 30 October 1592, proved 3 January 1592. My body to be buried 
in the church of Temple. The poor of the said parish. To William my 
eldest son my house wherein I now dwell, with all the furniture thereunto 
belonging; that is to say, one standing bed, with a truckle bed under it, with 
a feather bed in the one and a Hock bed in the other, two pair of sheets 
and a pair of blankets and the best coverlet which I bought of Lynzey the 
wait player. But Annes my wife shall have and hold the said house and 
furniture till William my son come to the age of twenty and one years. 
And after that, if the said Agnes remain a widow, she shall pay twenty 
shillings yearly for rent &c. To the said William the lease of the house 
wherein my mother now inhabiteth, the same to hold immediately after the 
decease of my said mother. Other legacies to the said William. Remainder 
to his brethren in order of age (Robert, Thomas and John). Special be- 
quests to them and to daughter Elizabeth, at one and twenty. My brother 
Richard Pitte's two daughters. Sir Richard Martyn of Temple. Wife 


























































. 


















252 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Agnes to be executrix and Mr. John Pickes and Thomas Heywarde to be 
overseers. Newell, 1. 

RoiiRRT Owen of tho city of Bristol, merchant, now bound on a voyage 
into the parts beyond the seas, 5 September 1614, with a codicil dated 4 
September 1615, proved 1G February 1G15. To wife Mary four hundred 
pounds and the messuage wherein I now dwell situate upon the " Kaye " 
within the said city, to hold for life; and after her decease I give the said 
messuage to ray son Robert Owen. I give my said son all my lands, mes- 
suages &c. in Bristol and in Portbury, Somerset, or elsewhere, and also two 
hundred pounds. To my daughter Mary Owen three hundred pounds. 
The same to daughter Jphane Owen and the child wherewith my wife now 
goeth, yet unborn. A great part of my estate is in Adventure at sea, part 
insured by Policy of Assurance recorded in the Royal Exchange in Lon- 
don and part upon mine own adventure not insured. Wife Mary to have 
the use and keeping of my children's legacies until they shall accomplish 
their several ages of. one and twenty or be married, she putting in sureties 
to be bound in double the sum to pay the said legacies together with the 
benefit and use for the same at the rate of nine per cent for one whole year 
until such time as they shall be paid. My brother Griffeth Owen. My 
sister Mary Owen. My brother George Owen. My sister Ellinor Owen. 
My brother. Griffeth Owen to pay his brother and sisters at the town of 
Carmarthen. Wife Mary and son Robert to be executors and loving cousin 
Rice Davies Esquire and loving brother in law William Pitt, merchant, and 
good friend William Baldwyn, brewer, to be overseers. In the codicil he 
increases the legacies to his daughters Mary and Johane by two hundred 
pounds apiece more. 

Probate was granted to the widow as above but was not granted to the 
son, Robert Owen, until 24 April 1627. Cope, 8. 

William Pitt of the city and Diocese of Bristol, sheereman or cloth- 
worker, 11 January 1G03, proved 21 April 1604. To be buried in the 
church and churchyard of Temple in the said city. To my son Francis 
Pyttes the messuage &c. wherein I dwell, with remainder to my brother 
Robert Pities and noxt to my right heirs i&c. To my said brother Robert 
the house, rack and garden now in the tenure of Richard Baker, weaver, 
after the decease of my grandmother Johan Pittes. To my godson William 
Hall the lease of the house wherein his father doth dwell, and if he die 
before he come to the age of one anri twenty then the same lease shall 
remain to Samuel Wilson the son of my sister Wilson. To my said sister 
Wilson six pounds out of that debt which my brother in law Lawrence 
Wilson owes me, as by a judgment had in the court of Common Pleas 
more at large appeareth. To Anno Weale my wife's sister's daughter five 
pounds. To my cousin Sara Pope three pounds at her day of marriage or 
age of one and twonty years. Certain debts of Richard Baker, William 
Deane and Richard Gouldsmith forgiven. The remainder to my son 
Francis Pittes whom I ordain and make my sole and whole executor, pro- 
vided that if it shall please Almighty God to call out of this mortal life my 
said son Francis before he shall accomplish the full age of one and twenty 
years or be married then my will and meaning is that my cousin John Pittes 
shall have twenty pounds in money out of the legacies bequeathed to my 
said son ; and then also I do ordain and make my said brother Robert Pittes 
to be the executor &c. And I do appoint my laying friends Francis Bayllye 















• 


















] 



• 






1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 253 

and Richard Simondes to be my overseers &c. desiring them, as my trust in 
them is, to see this my will truly and justly to he performed, as much as in 
them lieth, and to see my said sou to ho brought tip in the fear of God. 
They to have for their pains twenty shillings apiece. And I appoint the 
said Richard Goldsmith to have the keeping and education of my said son 
Francis as long as my said overseers shall think it litt and convenient. 

Commission at the above date to Francis Bayllye and Richard Symondes, 
the supervisors named in the will, to administer the goods &c. according to 
the tenor of the will during the minority of Robert Pittes (sic) brother &c. 
and executor &c. llarte, 43. 

William Pitt of the city of Bristol merchant, 13 Slay 1 G22, proved 
4 February 1G24. To my loving wife Mary five hundred pounds. To my 
son William two hundred and lifty pounds. To my son Robert three score 
and ten pounds. To my son Henry two hundred and lifty pounds. To my 
son Thomas two hundred and lifty pounds. To my daughter Mary Pitt two 
hundred and fifty pounds. To my daughter Anno Pitt two hundred and 
lifty pounds. To my daughter Maude Pitt two hundred and lifty pounds. 
To my daughter Martha Pitt two hundred and lifty pounds. To my wife Mary 
a lease of the house wherein I now dwell, in Redclife Street, and also of the 
house in the same street wherein Samuel Griffeth the glasier dwelleth and my 
garden in St. "Thomas Lane, for life, paying unto my son William four pounds 
yearly for the same during her life. After her deeease I give the said two 
houses and garden to my son William &c, with remainder to son Henry, 
then to son Thomas, next to my son Robert and lastly to my heirs general. 
To my son Robert the tenement without Temple gate called the Saracen's End 
(sic) and the new-built house thereby built by my father, with all the lands 
and tenements thereto belonging and all such implements as I have in the 
said tenements, the said lands and tenements given by my father Thomas 
Pitt, as appeareth by his last will and testament. To my sons Henry and 
Thomas Pitt the years yet to come in a tease for two tenements and garden 
that I have in Redclifre Street (and oilier leases). To my niece Ann 
Watteres a lease of forty years in the tenements at the Marsh gate wherein 
William Dale now dwelleth, but if she die before the expiration of said lease 
I give the residue to my nephew Robert Mericke, they paying unto my son 
William four pounds six shillings eight pence a year rent and he to pay the 
lord's rent. If Robert Miricke die before the forty years be expired the 
residue shall be to my son William. Certain household stuff to William. To 
Maude my lesser Ciprus (sic) chest. To my daughter Mary Pitt my chain 
of gold and to my daughter Anne Pitt my white silver and gilt tankard 
which was given them by my lather and to Martha the inlaid chest in the 
great chamber. I give to my son William Pitt my best Turkies (sic) ring 
which was my great grandfathers Mr Roger Cooke's, my second ring with 
a pearl I give to my son Robert, my signet ring I give to my son Henry 
and my ruby ring I give to my son Thomas. My books 1 give to my son 
William. A lot of household stuff to be sold and a quarter part of the 
sum made thereof to bo given to wife and three quarters to the children, or 
else to be divided (without selling it). Sons William, Robert, Henry and 
Thomas to have their portions on arriving at age of one and twenty and 
daughters Mary, Anne, Maude and Martha at times of marriage or at twenty 
one, and so one after the other. I give to my brother in law Mr Richard 
Davis twenty shillings to make him a ring for a token and to sister Mary 
Davis a double Harry sovereign of gold. , To my sister Marlowe and sister 
vol. xux. 22* 



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254 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Gonning, each a rose noble of gold. To my cousin Mary Robinson ten 
shillings in gold. To my sister Alice Knight a gown to the value of three 
pounds and a double duckett (sic) in gold and to my brother Knight ten 
shillings in gold. To my cousin William Pitt, draper, a double ducat in 
gold and to my wife a square ducat in gold which my mother gave me. 
All these tokens are in an ivory box in my counter ; the box by itself I give 
to my sister Mary Davis for a token. I give to my cousin William Pitt, 
draper, forty shillings to make him a ring and to my cousin Nicholas Pickes 
thirty shillings to make him a ring for tokens. To the poor of St. Thomas, 
of Temple and of Itedclif parishes three pounds to be distributed amongst the 
three parishes. A great part of my estates is in debts and beyond seas. 
Any loss shall be borne upon all my legacies rateably upon the pound. 
What gold or jewels my wife had of her own and in her keeping at the 
date hereof I give to her. My debts and legacies being paid all my goods* 
and chattels unbequeathed I give unto my loving wife Mary and to my son 
William whom I make joint executors &c. and do appoint my well beloved 
cousins Mr. William Pitt, draper, and Mr Nicholas Pikes, gen 1 ., overseers. 
Witnessed by Ric: Marlowe, Nicholas Pike and Richard Griffetb. 

Published (after alterations made) 30 October 1624, in presence of 
William Pitt, Edward Batten, Abraham Edwards. 

Proved by the oaths of Mary Pitt, relict, and William Pitt, son, &c. be- 
fore Richard Knight vicar of Temple &c. Clarke, 1&. 

William Pitt of the city of Bristol, merchant, son of Mary Pitt of 
the same city, widow, 2 October 1630, proved 9 June 1631. My will is 
that all mine estate shall be tied to make good my father's debts and 
legacies, and they being paid, if so much shall remain, all mine household 
stuff shall be divided among my mother, sisters and brothers, whereof my 
mother shall have a quarter and the other three quarters be equally divided 
amongst my brothers and sisters. My brother Henry and sister Mawd, 
when they shall have their portions due, shall have the full sum given them 
by my father with their parts of m\ brother Thomas and sister Martha's 
legacies, and shall then receive interest at 8 p.c. for their whole portions both 
given them by my father and due to them by the death of my brother Thomas 
and sister Martha, and the interest to be continued from my father's death. 
Reference to brother Robert and sisters Mary and Anne as having received 
their legacies. To the poor of Redcliife, St. Thomas and Temple parishes. 
My mother shall have my spruce chest, my brother Robert the Hand 
counter, my sister Mary the great tankard, my sister Anne the cedar chest, 
my brother Henry my silver posnett and taster, my sister Maud the silver 
goblet and two of my father's spoons. And I desire my mother, Mrs Mary 
Pitt, to see this my will performed. St. John, 70. 

William Pitt of the city of Bristol, alderman, 18 October 1631, 
proved 12 January 1631. To wife Sara twenty pounds to buy her a ring 
of live diamonds, in lieu of one she weareth which my wile Elizabeth gave 
to her daughter Mary Pitt, which ring my will is that my daughter 
Mary Pitt shall enjoy according to her mother's desire. Four hun- 
dred pounds each to sons William, Henry, John and Thomas Pitt. 
Five hundred pounds each to eldest daughter Mary Pitt and youngest 
daughter Martha Pitt (the latter apparently under one and twenty). To 
my daughter Ann Whetcombe one hundred pounds upon condition that her 
father in law Mr Robert Whetcombe do perform his promise (that is to 












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1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 255 

Bay) to grant no estates from the time of the marriage of his son John 
Whetcombe to my daughter Anne Whetcombe of forty pounds per annum 
in the manor of Thornelford the which lie promised to lay as demeanes to 
annex it to the old rent for the better help of his son and my daughter after 
his father's decease. To my sister Anne Gethinge forty pounds. To my 
sister Mary Batten five pounds to buy her a ring. To my daughter in law 
Elizabeth Chetwin five pounds to buy her a ring. To Edward Pitt, the 
son of my brother John, twenty pounds at one and twenty years of age. 
To Mary Pitt, the daughter of my brother John, ten pounds at day of 
marriage or one and twenty years of age. To the companies of Tuckers 
and Shermen five pounds to be divided amongst the poorest of those com- 
panies, I ordain my good friends, my brother Mr Ezekiel Wallis, my 
brother Edward Batten, Mr John Taylor and Mr Robert Elliott to be 
overseers and give them five pounds apiece for their pains &c. The rest of 
my goods &c. Lgive and bequeath unto my well beloved son and heir Edward 
Pitt, whom I make and ordain my whole and sole executor, requiring him, 
upon my blessing, to see my will performed according as I desire and to be 
helpfull to his brethren and sisters according to his power; and do desire 
God to bless them all. Audley, 2. 

Maiiy Pitt of the parish of St. Thomas within the city of Bristol, 
widow, 8 June 1634, proved 25 November 1634. I will that eight pounds, 
according to the gift and intent of my con William Pitt, in his last will and 
testament, be given, disposed and bestowed in land by my executor, to re- 
main for ever, to be divided amongst the poor people of the parishes of 
St. Thomas, St. Mary RedclifYe and Temple parish in Bristol, being to be 
settled in land to remain for ever, and the better part of the three parts 
thereof to be given to St. Thomas parish. I give and bequeath to Mary 
Newell and to John Newell her son the sum of one hundred and twenty 
pounds of lawful money in manner and form following, that is to say, to 
my said daughter Newell the use only of the said one hundred and twenty 
pounds so long as she and her now husband Andrew Newell liveth, which 
I will shall be paid unto her yearly by my executor at the four usual Feast 
Days in the year, viz 1 , the feast day of the Nativity of our Lord and Saviour 
Jesus Christ, the Annunciation of our blessed Lady St. Mary the Virgin, 
St. John the Baptist and St. Michael the Arch " Angle " &c, &c. and in 
case my said daughter shall outlive her said husband then my will is that my 
said executor shall, within one year next after the death of the said Andrew 
Newell, pay unto my said daughter Mary the sum of one hundred pounds 
of the said sum given as aforesaid and shall reserve twenty pounds of the 
said six score pounds in his, my executor's, hands until the said John Newell 
her son shall attain to the age of one ard twenty years and then to pay the 
said twenty pounds to him the said John Newell. If my said daughter die 
before the said Andrew her husband the whole sum shall remain in the 
hands of my executor until the said John Newell shall attain to the said 
ago and then my said executor to pay the six score pounds unto my said 
grandchild; for it is not my will that the said Andrew Newell, his fathers- 
should enjoy any part thereof nor any the profit or interest thereof. My 
said daughter Mary to have the profit and rent of the term of years yet to 
come of and in one tenement at Portwalls, now in the possession of Law- 
rence Wilson, (her husband to have nothing therein) and after her decease 
I give the said house and remainder of the term unto my son Henry Pitt. 
I give unto my said daughter Mary Newell all my wearing apparel, except 



256 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

my best gown and petticoat which I give unto my daughter Mawde Pitt. I 
give unto the said Mary my wedding ring. I give unto my daughter Mawde 
Pitt one hundred pounds and all my childbed linen &c. and my diamond 
ring. To my daughter Anne Edwardes sixty pounds &c. and my ring with 
a " Turkie " stone therein. To my daughter Martha Pitt my ring with a 
ruby stone in it. To my son Robert Pitt all that ray lands and grounds, 
with the appurtenances &c, which I lately purchased of one Thomas Cow- 
dry, being part of the manor of Compton Magna in the County of Somerset, 
to hold for life, and after his decease to William his son, with remainder 
to Robert, the second son of the said Robert my son, and then to the right 
heirs of my said son. I give to my said son Robert all my part of the 
land and tenements situate and being in the Pittie {sic) within the city of 
Bristol. To my son Henry Pitt the house in Redcliife Street wherein I 
now dwell and one little house in the possession of one John Cole, being 
purchased with the said dwelling house, with household stuff &c. &c. I give 
him also a tenement upon the back in Bristol, held of the Chamber of the 
said city and now in the possession of William Prosser, and two other tene- 
ments in Redcliife Street, held of the Dean and Chapter of Bristol, one in 
the possession of Thomas Dayes and the other in the possession of Thomas 
Hudson, and a little garden ground in St. Thomas Lane in Bristol. I give 
the said Henry also fifty pounds in money. To William Edwards my 
grandchild one silver and gilt beakei. Another to John Pitt my grand- 
child. To my grandchild Robert Pitt one silver and gilt saltcellar and to 
my grandchild John Edwards a silver beer bowl. I make my son Robert 
executor and my loving brothers in law Mr Abraham Edwards and Mr 
John Pearse, to whom I give forty shilling apiece, overseers. I give to my 
grandchild William Pitt my silver tankard which was my son William's. 
My sister Pearse to have four pounds to buy her a mourning gown. Mr 
Loveringe to preach my funeral sermon and to have four pounds for his pains. 
My brother Pawle to have forty shillings to buy him a mourning cloak and 
sister Bushe live pounds for her mourning. Seager, 'J7. 

Edward Batten of Bristol gentleman, 15 September 1638, proved 16 
November 1 038. The poor of Temple parish in Bristol. Wife Mary 
Batten. My three tankards which I bought of my cousin Pitt I give to my 
three grandchildren and godsons Edward Hobbs, son of Thomas Hobbs, 
Edward Galhampton, son of \Y r illiam Galhampton, and Edward Colston, 
son of William Colston, the eldest of. them to choose first. To ray daughter 
Mary Hobbs and her heirs, after the death of ray wife, my tenements in Bristol 
lying between Key and Marsh street and the Lanthorn tenement and the 
sum of five hundred pounds. To my daughter Elizabeth Batten the leases of 
ray lands in Westerley which I hold of Mr Roberts. To my daughter Sarah 
Colston for her better maintenance of her and her husband &c. all my lands 
and leases in both the llambrookes in the parish of Winterborne. My 
daughter Anne Dollinge. My daughter Martha Galhampton. My tene- 
ment in Bristol wherein my son in law Colston dwelleth. My daughter 
Anne's husband John Dolling and her daughter Mary Dolling and the rest 
of her children. I do give unto Edward Batten and William Pitt my 
cousins forty pounds apiece, at my executor's discretion, committing them 
to his care. My sister in law Mrs Gittin* and her children. My brother 
Symon Batten. My son in law Mr Thomas ilobbes 1 appoint executor 

* Referred to In will of William Pitt (1G31) ua *' sister Anne Gothingo." 



1805,] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 257 

and do desire my cousin Mr Edward Pitt and Mr Richard Meredith, vicar of 
Stogarsey, to bo the overseers. Published the 10 th of September 1638. 

Lee, 156. 

Sarah Nktiiway of Bristol, widow of Thomas Nethway merchant 
deceased, her will made 11 January 1640, with a codicil bearing date 27 
February 1610 and a later codicil 7 March 1640, proved 18 June 1641. 
To be buried in the church of St. Walburgh near deceased husband. My 
loving brother Mr George Lane, merchant, to be executor and my trusty 
friends INF. Giles Elbridge and Mr. Joseph Jackson, merchants, to be over- 
seers. Children under age. My sister Laurence. My sister Butler and 
her three children which she had by John Hurston, viz 1 . Laurence, John 
and Anne Hurston. My brother in law William Ilolman. Certain friends 
and servants and poor householders. Whereas my brother in law Mr 
Edward Pitt, now one of the Sheriffs of the said city of Bristol, and Mr 
John Goning, merchant, became bound to my deceased husband for the 
payment of two hundred and fifty pounds within a short time after the 
death of my sister in law Mrs Pitts I will that my eldest son Thomas 
Nethway shall have the full benefit of the said bond. My daughter Sarah. 
My son George. My five children, Thomas, George, John, Sarah and 
Elizabeth. 

My sister Butler's husband. My husband died without a will. George 
and Richard, the sons of brother George Lane. Richard Nethway, brewer. 

My cousin — Hall in mo: (sic) to be paid unto her &c. My sister 

Jone Lane. My sister Anne Butler. To my daughter Sarah Nethway the 
four pictures of her grandmother, father and mother which hang in my 
chamber and ever my counter door. Evelyn, 74. 

William Pitt of London, merchant, 19 March, 1645, proved 23 
August 1647. The poor of St. Nicholas parish in Bristol. My loving 
brother in law Mr William Chetwind to see it distributed, or, if he bo dead, 
my brother in law Mr. Walter Sandy. My loving sister Elizabeth Chet- 
wind, wife of the said William Chetwind. My loving sister Mary Sandy 
wife of the said Walter Sandy. My loving sister Anne Wetcome wife of 

Whetcome. My loving sister Martha Willet wife unto William 

Willet. My cousin William Pitt, second son unto my brother Edward Pitt 
deceased. His sister or sisters. Mr William Pearse. Others named. My 
loving brother Thomas Pitt, or, if he dead, my cousin William Pitt afore- 
said, to be executor. 

Commission issued on the above date to William Chetwind the husband 
of Elizabeth Chetwind als Pitt, sister of the deceased William Pitt, 
bachelor, to administer during the absence of Thomas Pitt, brother and 
executor &c. Fines, 182. 

Thomas Pitt of the city of Bristol, merchant, 27 February 1655, 
proved 2(\ March 1657. All my nephews and all my nieces. My two 
sisters Mary Saney (sic) and Martha Willett. My loving brothers Walter 
Saney and William Willett. Loving friend Hugh Roberts. John Bing- 
ham. Ruthen, 105. 

[The foregoing wills relate to the Pitt family of Bristol to which belonged 
Maud the wife of Richard Russell and Mary *he wife of Andrew Newell, both 
of Charlestown, Massachusetts. They were two of the daughters of William 
Pitt of Bristol, whose will, proved i February J.G24-5, I haye here given. And 



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258 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

he was a son of that Thomas Pitt whose will has already been published among 
my Holworthy notes (Keg. vol. 45, p. 161). See also in the same volume (p. 
150) art earlier reference to this family in the will of John Man. In the same 
volume of the Register (pp. 229-230) see a note about Russell, Newell and Pitt 
connection. 

Since collecting the above notes for publication, I have gathered the fol- 
lowing will, which relates to this family and their connections. (See will of 
Thomas Pitt above referred to). IIenky F. Waters.] 

Cicely Guning (or Gunning) of St. Stephen's, Bristol, widow, 2 
October 1G30, with a codicil dated 17 October 1631, proved 20 February 
1631. To be buried in the church of St. Warborow's, in which parish 
I was born. Brother Richard Marlow and my sister Mary his wife. Mary 
Camplin. My cousin Anne Ditcher the elder. My cousin Nicholas Peakes 
and his son Walter Peakes. My cousin William Hopkins, my sister's eldest 
son, and her son Robert Hopkins. My cousin Grace Hewett. My cousin 
Thomas Williams. My cousin Walter Powell. Thomas and Walter 
Osborne. My cousin Alice Willis. Elizabeth Triggs. William Osborne 
of Coldashton. William Atwood of Deynton gen 1 . My aunt Freeman. 
The two children of Alice Willis. Martha Hopkins. My cousin John 
Betterton. Anne and Abigail Hopkins the two daughters of nephew 
William Hopkins. My sister Marlow's four children, William, Robert, 
Grace arid Martha. Friends and kinsmen Mr. Nicholas Peakes, Mr. 
Peter Hewett, William Atwood and John lloyd (of Bristol, vintner). 
Anne Rycroft wife of Robert Rycroft. 

Commission issued 11 December 1648 to Peter Hewyt and Grace 
Hewyt, his wife, and to Henry Hippon and Martha Ilippon, his wife, 
nieces on the sister's side &c. 

Another Registration on Folio 24. Audley, 13. 

William Chaplen of Long Melford in Suffolk, yeoman, 15 November 
1575, proved 25 January 1577. Body to be buried in the churchyard of 
Melford. The poor of Melford, Sudbury, Ackton, Foxherd, Borley and 
Lyston. My brother Clemente Chaplen. His eldest son William, my god- 
son, at age of twenty one. My eldest son Edmunde. My daughter and 
his sister Alice. Mary Greengrasse daughter of John Greenegrasse late 
of Melford deceased. My sister Johan Ballard. Her two children, besides 
my godson, whom I shall hereafter consider. Ballardes boy now with 
me, lame. My godson, the son of ray said sister Ballard, at twenty one. 
My daughter Alice shall have her mother's bequest. My two sons 
Edmund and William to be executors and Mr Roger Martyn of Melford 
to be supervisor. My brother Thomas Chaplen. 

Among the witnesses were William Payne and Edmunde Chaplin. 

Langley, 3. 

Bdmonp Chaplin of St. Giles without Cripplegate, London, gen 1 ., 3 
July 1618, proved .10 April 1611. Wife Anne. My manor of Linsey 
ah Lillesley, Suffolk. Lands &c. in Seamer, Whatiield and Nawton, Suf- 
folk. Lands in Hadleigh and Aldham Suffolk. My chamber at G ray's 
Inn. My new dwelling house in Grub street, St. Giles. My four children 
Edmund, William, Ursula and Elizabeth, the sons at one and twenty, the 
daughters at seventeen or days of marriage. Messuage called Clarke's 
with lands, dovehouse &c, in Lynsey als Lillisley, Kersey and Growton to 
my son Edmond. I desire my loving father and mother to have a care of 
my aforesaid children and to bo as good, loving and kind unto them as thoy 



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1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 259 

would have been unto me if it had pleased God that I had lived to enjoy 
their love and kindness. I do ordain and appoint my loving brothers in 
law Thomas Bryan and John Wincoll to be the executors &c. and I give 
them ten pounds apiece and to each of their wives forty shillings to buy 
them rings. Augustine Rawe the younger, my godson. My brother in 
law Augustine Rawe to be overseer. I give him five pounds. 

Evelyn, 40. 

Samuel Cooke of Dublin, Ireland, 2 June 1642, proved 29 September 
1642. My mind and will is that Anne my wife shall enjoy my messuage 
called Rowse's &c, in St. Andrews and Riugfield, Suffolk, during her natu- 
ral life, she to receive the rents thereof according as the same is formerly 
assured unto her. And I give the same to my son John Cooke immediately 
after her decease. As for the rest of my whole estate my executors shall 
enter upon the same and shall receive such sums &c. as are or shall be due 
from any persons and shall employ and dispose thereof for the good and 
benefit of my daughter Anne Cooke and John Cooke my (sic) brother. 
They shall pay unto John Cooke my brother five hundred pounds at the 
end of six months next after the said John Cooke shall recover his perfect 
memory and understanding. And in case the said John shall die before he 
shall recover out of that melancholy course of life wherein he now liveth 
having issue of his body lawfully begotten they shall pay the said five hun- 
dred pounds unto the children of the said John &c., in discharge of all such 
covenants as are contained in a pair of indentures, bearing date 19 April 
7 Charles, between me the said Samuel and Erasmus Cooke of the one part 
and William Fiske of Norton gen 1 of the other part. And my executors 
shall pay unto such persons as the said John shall reside and live with the 
half part of all such sums as shall be necessarily laid out and expended for 
the convenient sustenance and maintenance of the said John my brother 
from time to time &c. so long as the said John shall live in case the said 
sum of five hundred pounds shall remain upaid as aforesaid. My mind and 
desire is that Anne my wife shall dispose of and maintain John Cooke my 
son, allowing him such maintenance as she shall think fit (in regard that 
my estate is much decayed by reason of the late rebellion in Ireland). 
And my executors shall maintain Anne Cooke my daughter &c. The re- 
sidue I give to my said daughter, she to receive and enjoy the same when 
she shall attain unto the full age of one and twenty years. I do nominate 
and appoint Erasmus Cooke my brother, Thomas Cooke of the City of 
London, goldsmith, ray kinsman, Clement Chaplaine of Wethersfield in 
New England my kinsman, and Tobias Norris of the City of Dublin in 
Ireland gen 4 to be the executors and John Fiske of Rattesden (Rattlesden) 
in Suffolk gen*., my kinsman, to be supervisor of this my last Will &c. 

Wit: Augustine Dudley, Philip Kett. Cambell, 111. 

Thomas Chaplin, citizen and clothworker of London, 8 August 1655, 
proved 19 September 1055. I will that Mary my wife shall have to tho full 
value of fifty pounds, in money or goods at her own election and choice. 
My executors to purchase a good estate of land and tenements of the clear 
yearly value of forty-five pounds by the year, for the use of my wife for 
life, then to remain unto Thomas and William Chaplyn, the two sons of 
my brother Samuel Chaplyn. And I will also that my brothers William 
Chaplyn, Clement Chaplyn and Daniel Chaplyn shall have of the next 
moneye that shall be raised out of my personal estate, each of them one 



260 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

hundred pounds. The rest shall he equally parted and divided between the 
children of my said brother William. My wife and brother William to be 
executors. Aylett, 197. 

[Other wills relating to this family of Chaplin have been already published 
in Part I. of these Gleanings, pp. 32 and 77 (q. v.). Edmond Chaplin, whose 
will I now give (written 1G18, but not proved until 1641) must have been the 
son of that Edmund Chaplin of Little Waldingfield, Suffolk, whose will, dated 
6 October 1G18, refers to this son as " my late son." 

Henry F. Waters.] 

Henry Steevens, citizen and haberdasher of London, 4 October 1612» 
proved 10 October 1612. To my brother William Steevens at Bath my 
whole estate in the house that he dwelleth in &c, and five hundred pounds. 
To John Dunster one hundred pounds. To my brother Robert Stevens 
one hundred pounds. To John Saunders thirty pounds. To David 
Woodroolfe ten pounds. To John Atkyns thirty pounds. To my aunt 
Rinchon ten pounds. To my uncle William Hamore twenty pounds. 
Certain servants. To Roger Dunster forty shillings to make him a ring. 
To my cousin Richard Prownde forty pounds. To my brother in law 
Raphe Haniore ten pounds. To mine uncle Josias Barry five pounds 
and to his son Henry Barry, my godson, ten pounds. To my aunt Quille 
forty shillings and to her daughter twenty shillings. To William Tucker 
three pounds and to his brother Thomas Tucker ten pounds. To Mr. 
Thompson preacher of Bristol ten pounds. To Mr. Doughtie of Bristol 
forty shillings, to make him a ring, and to my cousin John Tulie the like 
sum &c. To John Godskall the son of James Godskall forty shilling &c. 
All the above legacies to be paid out of one third part of my estate, one 
third being reserved unto Mary my loving wife, according to the laudable 
custom of the City of London, and the other third part to and amongst my 
three children, Barbara, Henry and Mary. My brother Robert Stevens 
to be full and whole executor and the forenamed John Dunster and John 
Tooly to be aiding unto him. 

Among other witnesses, Teste me Willmo Hamore p T ntium Scriptore. 

Fenner, 87. 

Raphe Hamor citizen and merchant taylor of London, 5 August 1615, 
proved 16 August 1615. To be bi ried in the parish church of St. Nicholas 
Aeon, where I was born, nigh the place where my father lieth or near the 
place where my wife lieth. My goods shall be divided into three equal parts 
according to the laudable custom of the City of London, one part to remain 
unto my now wife Susan, one other third to be divided to and amongst my 
children, Raphe, Mary and Jane, saving only two hundred pounds to be first 
deducted out of the said part and allowed to my said son Raphe Hamor, 
and the remainder to be equally divided. If my son Raphe die before he 
shall be married or receive the said two hundred pounds the said sum shall 
be equally divided amongst the children of my son Thomas Hamor. If my 
eldest son Thomas shall demand any of the second third part then my ex- 
ecutrix shall demand and have of him the sum of fourteen hundred pounds 
which he oweth unto me for money which I have lent and paid for him over 
and above one thousand pounds which 1 bestowed upon him to begin the 
world withall, which was a greater portion than I could well give to any 
of the rest of my children. But, being my eldest son, I was in hopes to 
have received joy and comfort in seeing him do well, which caused me to 
strain myself to do him good. For the other third part, reserved unto my- 



1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 261 

self, I do give and bequeath the same as followeth (then follows a series of 
legacies). The children of ray daughter Mary. My son in law John Col- 
lett (apparently her husband). The children of my daughter Jane, viz 1 . 
Raphe Langley and Jane, Sarah and Anne Langley. My brother William 
Ilamor and his children, viz f . Lcttice Atkinson, Sarah Ilamor, Robert 
Hamor, Jane Haraor and William Ilamor. My grandchild Thomas Ilamor 

(a minor). Elizabeth and Ilamor, (laughters of ray son Thomas. 

The Worshipful Company of Merchant taylors. The Company of 
Clothworkers. The Mayor and his brethren, for the time being, of the 
City of Exeter. John, Thomas and William Tooker sons of my brother 
John Tooker deceased. Bathsheba Swelling at day of her marriage. My 
brother in law Jonas Owen. The brothers and sisters of the said Bath- 
sheba. To Christ's Hospital in London. The parish of St. Nicholas 
Aeon. The parish of All Hallows in Bread Street. My wife Susan to bo 
sole executrix. And I desire my loving cousin Israel Owen, Christofer 
Barron my son in law, and ray brother Snelling to be overseers of this 
my will. 

One of the witnesses was John Milton scr. Rudd, 78. 

Sententia pro confirraatione testamenti Radulphi Haraor nuper dum vixit 
parochie Omnium Sanctorum in Bread Street, Civitatis London &c. de- 
functi was pronounced 16 February 1620 in a cause between Sara J3aron, 
executrix of the will of Susan Hamor deceased, while she lived executrix 
named in the will of the said Ralph Hamor deceased, on the one part and 
William Hamor, the brother, and Thomas and Ralph Ilamor the sons of 
the said Ralph Ilamor deceased, on the other part. Dale, 12. 

[Ralph TTamor, a member of the Merchant Taylor's Company of Loudon, and 
interested in colonization, was the father of Ralph Hamor, the younger, author 
of " A Trve Discovrse of the Present Estate of Virginia," London 1G15. For 
accounts of both father and son see Alexander Brown's " Genesis of the United 
States," Vol. II., p. 908. The will of Susan Ilamor, widow of the testator, 
Ralph Ilamor, the elder, is printed on page 218. — Editor.] 

Anne Noyes of Cholderton, Wilts, widow, 18. March 1655, proved 21 
April 1658. I give and bequeath to James and Nicholas Noyes, my two 
sons, now in New England, twelve pence apiece and to such children as 
they have living twelve ponce apiece. To my son in law Thomas Kent of 
Upper Wallop twelve pence, to Ids wife live shillings and to their children 
twelve pence apiece. To Robert Read of Cholderton in the Co. of South- 
ampton, gen'yall the rest and residue &c, and I do make the said Robert 
Rede sole executor. Signed Anne Noyce. Wootton, 130. 

[Anne Noyes, a sister of Rev. Robert Parker, and aunt to the mother of 
Benjamin Wooclbridge, Harvard's first graduate, and to Rev. Thomas Parker, 
first minister at Newbury, Mass., was the widow of Rev. William Noyes, in- 
cumbent of the church of St. Nicholas, Cholderton, Wilts, 1G01-21. lie was 
succeeded by his son, Rev. Nathan Noyes, who continued in residence till 1651. 
The church is ancient, the primal advowson being dated in 1175. A complete 
list of incumbents since 12!>7 is preserved. In 1850, the present church cdiilco 
was consecrated. The parish register exists since 1051, none having been kept 
before that date. The earliest recorded baptism is that of "Joan, daughter 
of Edmund Noyes, 25 May 1052." The earliest recorded burial is that of " Alice 
Smith, widdow, 13 Sept. 1053." A terrier, an inventory of the property belong- 
ing to the rectory, dated 13 Dec. 1077, is signed by Richard Noyes, Edward 
Noyes and others. Cholderton is a parish in the hundred of Amesbury, five 
miles distant from the town. It is situated on the river Bourne, on the 
border of the counties of Wilts and Southampton. It is sometimes called 
vol. xi.ix. 23 


















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262 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

West Cholderton to distinguish it from the parish of Choldcrton, Hampshire, 
•which is known as East Cholderton. The parishes lie on the main road from 
Amesbury to Andover. 

The testatrix's son James, born 1G03, was "the blessed light of Newbury," 
teacher of the church there from its formation, 1G36, till his death in 1G5G. lie 
was the author, 1(541, of " a catechism for the instruction of children," by desire 
of the general court. The other son, Nicholas, born 1014, was deacon of the 
church at Newbury, and died in 1701. Descendants of both arc numerous. 
Another son, Nathan, his father's successor in the Cholderton church, had died in 
1651. lie was buried at Salisbury, with an inscription : " Here lyeth interred the 
body of Mr. Nathan Noyes, a godly painful and constant preacher of God's 
Word at West Choldrington in this County for the space of 32 years, who 
departed this life the 6th day of September An. Do. 1651. his age was neere 54 
yeares." 

Upper Wallop is a parish in Hampshire, about ten miles from Cholderton, 
midway between Andover and Salisbury. Richard and Stephen Kent were fel- 
low settlers at Newbury with James and Nicholas Noyes. Thomas Kent was an 
■ earlier settler at Gloucester. 

The name of Robert Read appears in the Calendar of State Papers, Charles II. 
1GG2, as follows: " The King wishes Robert Reade of Cholderton to be appre- 
hended and examined on Kdw. Jasper's information." Geo. A. GORDON.] 

Moses Browne citizen and founder of London, 30 May 1688, witli a 
codicil 1 June 1688, proved 14 June 1688. To. my sister Margaret Vent- 
liam one hundred and fifty pounds. To my sister Dorothy Rigga the like 
sum. To my sister Sarah Noyso of New England one hundred pounds. 
To her two sons William and Joseph Noyse fifty pounds apiece. To my 
cousin Rebecca Ventham one hundred and fifty pounds. To my cousin 
Rebecca Jaques one hundred and fifty pounds. To my cousin Anne Mar- 
shal the like sum. To my cousin Dorothy Gillife one hundred pounds. To her 
eon Benjamin Gillife fifty pounds. To my cousin Willoughby Browne two 
hundred pounds. To my cousin Elizabeth Browne the like sum. To my 
cousin Peter Browne one hundred and fifty pounds. To my cousin Thomas 
Carter one hundred pounds. To my cousin Ruth Whithcock fifty pounds. 
To my cousin Elizabeth Court the like sum. To my cousin Stockwell ten 
pounds. To my cousin Benjamin Wilkes, brewer, the like sum and the 
like to my cousin Richard Browne. The poor pensioners of the Com- 
pany of Founders of London. D»\ Ansley, Mr. Cole and Mr. Barker, 
ministers. I give, devise and bequeath uuto the said Benjamin Wilks 
and Richard Brown and my cousin Richard Ventham of Andover, clothier, 
all my messuages, lands, &c. in Ilson upon the Hill or elsewhere in the 
Co. of Leicester upon special trust &c. to sell all the above for payment 
of legacies &c. In case my cousin Thomas Brown shall, within two 
months next after my decease, deliver or cause to be delivered up unto 
my said sister Margaret Ventham, to be cancelled, all such bonds and 
obligations wherein my said sister's late husband became bound or obliged 
unto James Brown, father of the said Thomas Brown, for eighty pounds, 
or any other sum, then 1 give and bequeath unto the said Thomas Brown 
all such moneys as belong to mo in tho East India Company of London. 
1 will that gloves shall be given at my funeral and that my funeral charges 
shall not exceed forty pounds in the whole. I do make the said Benjamin 
Wilkes, Richard Browne and Richard Ventham joint executors and appoint 
my loving friends Mr. Isaac Chancey of London, physician, and John Dakius 
of London, scrivener, to bo overseers. 

Jn tho codicil he mentions having given bond unto Mary Butler, execu- 
trix of the last will of late brother Thomas Browne deceased, with condition 
to pay unto cousin James Browne, since deceased (who was brother to tho 






















































































































































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'- 1895.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 2G3 

within named Thomas Browne) three hundred pounds, or some other sum 
of motiey, and testator expressly wills and declares that the said Thomas 
Browne, within named, shall not h;ive, receive &e. the legacy in the East 
India Company, or any part thereof unless he deliver up to the executors 
the said obligation to be cancelled or made void. Exton, 75. 

The Will and Testament of Samuel Jackson, son to Mr. Edmund Jack- 
ie son late of Boston, 7 August 1G-12, proved 21 November 1G46. I do freely 
give unto my loving brother Nathaniel Jackson, son to my father Edmond 
Jackson, the sum of five pounds which was left me by my uncle Mr. John 
Storio at his death, which was duo unto me the fifteenth day of March last past, 
A.D. I 1 1 , and was to be paid me by Mrs. Millieent Storie, wife to Mr. John 
Storio, whom ho left his executor. And I do freely give unto my sister 
Sarah Jackson, daughter to my father &c., eight pounds which was given 
mo at the death of my grandfather Mr. Robert Story, duo to me the fifteenth 
day of March last, and five pounds which was given me by the will of my 
grandmother Mrs. Elizabeth Storie, wife to Mr. Robert Storie, which was 
left to be paid by my uncle Storie, son to the said Robert and Elizabeth 
Storie, due to me the fifteenth day of March aforesaid, but with a proviso 
that the said Sarah pay unto John Perrott, citizen and merchant taylor of 
London, who liveth in Abchurch Lane in the parish of St. Nicholas Aeons, 
the sum of twenty shillings which I borrowed of him for my own use. 
And I do give unto my brother Elishs Jackson, son &c, twenty shillings to 
be paid unto him or whom he shall appoint. And I do likewise give to my 
sister Mary, now Mary Woodward, living in Boston in New England, twenty 
shillings, to be paid to her or her child or to my brother Elisha if in case 
she should die; so likewise if my brother Elisha should die before the receipt 
thereof to fall to my sister Mary Jackson, and if they both die to fall to my 
sister Sarah. 

Wit: John Fullerton. 

Commission, as above, to Nathaniel Jackson, brother &c, to administer 
the goods &e. according to the tenor of the above will, no executor having 
been named. Twisse, 1G0. 

[In the 'Probate Act Book for the year 1G4G the testator of the above will is 
called "late of Boston in the Co. of Lincoln." II. F. Watebs.] 

Martha Lke of Mansel Street in Goodmans Fields in the parish of St. 
Mary Matfellon ah Whitechapel, Middlesex, widow, 26 April 1725, proved 
5 May 1725. I give all my messuage &'c. in Gracechurch Street, London, 
and all my lands in Cope parish or elsewhere in the Co. of Westmoreland and 
Colony of Virginia, in parts beyond the seas, unto my son George Lee &c. 
for ever. I give all my messuages, lands &c. in the Co. of Suffolk (sub- 
ject to a mortgage and subject also to the payment of one hundred pounds 
to Daniel Watts, at one and twenty, pursuant to the will of Thomas Moore, 
my former husband deceased) unto my two daughters Martha Leo and 
Lettice Lee &c., share and share alike as tenants in common and not as 
joint tenants &c. If all my said three children, George, Martha and Lettice 
Lee, shall happen to die without issue I give and devise my said estate in 
the city of London unto such of the children of my late brother John Silk 
deceased and of the children of my brother Abraham Silk as shall be then 
living &c., and then also I give my said estate in Suffolk to my brother 
Tobias Silk. To my very good friend Mr. Oliver Marton of the Temple, 
my brother the said Tobias Silk and William Wareham, citizen and barber 



204: Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

surgeon of London, ten pounds apiece for mourning. The residue of my 
personal estate to my said three children, equally to be divided among them 
at ages of. one and twenty years &c. My brother Tobias and the said Mr. 
William Wareham to be their guardians. To Ruth Hill, widow, and 
Neomi Hill, her daughter, five pounds apiece to put themselves into mourn- 
ing. Romney, 114. 

Edward Sprague of Upway, Dorset, fuller, 6 June 1614, proved 13 
October 1614. My body to be buried within the churchyard. To the parish 
church of Upway ten shillings. To the poor ten shillings. To Ralph 
Sprague my eldest son one of the oldest pair of shears in my shop and one 
lesser pair called the " quarrell." To my eldest daughter Alice Sprague fifty 
pounds. To Edward, my second son, two pair of shears and twenty pounds. 
To Richard, my third son twenty pounds at one and twenty years of age. 
To Christopher, my fourth son, twenty pounds at one and twenty. To 
William, my youngest son, twenty pounds at one and twenty. All the rest 
of my goods &c. to Christian Sprague my wife, whom I do make my whole 
executrix. And I do appoint Henry Sanvoyes (Qu. Samwayes ?) and 
William Bryer overseers. 

Wit: John Bishoppe and John Tayler (by mark). 

Memorandum that whereas the living of the abovesaid Edward Sprague 
doth fall unto his son Ralphe Sprague after his decease the said Ralfe 
Sprague doth, upon his father's request promise that his mother Christian 
Sprague shall quietly enjoy the said living until he shall be one and twenty 
years of age. Lawe, 104. 

[Ralph, Richard and William Sprague, sons of the testator, came to New Eng- 
land and settled at Charlestown. William afterwards removed to Hingliam. See 
Wyman's Charlestown, Vol. II., pp. 887-93; History of Hingham, Vol. III., pp. 
168-183; Savage's Genealogical Dictionary, Vol. IV., pp. 153-G; and Memoirs 
of the Sprague Family, by Richard Soule jr., pp. 78-97. — Editor.] 

The last will and testament of James Carter, 5 September 1626, proved 
11 April 1627. I give and bequeath one black cloak lined with velvet and 
a seal ring unto my brother John Carter and thirty pounds sterling to be 
divided equally amongst his children, as also ten pounds sterling unto 
William Symous children. To my cousin Richard Terry and his wife and 
William White and his wife, each of them, live pounds sterling apiece, to 
make them rings. To my wife's brothers and sisters forty shillings apiece 
(for lings). To Mr. Sedgwicke forty shillings in gold and forty shillings to 
the poor of that parish. Also I give fifty acres of land which I bought of 
my Lady Dales in Shurley Hundred Hand (sic) unto the parish whereof 
now Mr. Proby is minister, to be a place of " Residencye " for him and such 
as shall succeed him in that parish. I make my wife Susanna Carter my 
solo executrix. Also my will and desire is that Mr. Nathaniel Cansy (or 
Causy) and Richard Love should havo the oversight of tho shipping my 
goods in tho upland and Robert Sweoto and Richard Love for the lowland, 
for which their pains I give them whatsoever they will demand. Further- 
more, God sending the ship well home to her port, I entreat my trusty and 
well beloved friends and kinsmen Richard Perry and John Perry to have 
the oversight of such goods of mine as then come home in tho aforesaid 
ship, as also to assist my wife in all things which may concern her good, 
for which J give them thirty pounds cterliug, which, together with tho rest of 
tho legacies, I will should be paid four months after the goods are sold and 



1805.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 2G5 

the money received. Also I give unto my servant James Ostin one whole 
year of his time, hoping lie will be the more careful and ready to please my 
well beloved wife, whom, as the last testimony of love, I In treat God to 
bless spiritually, temporally and eternally. 

AVit: Richard Lowe, Richard Clifton, Grcavell Pooly Cleric: . 

Skynner, 41. 

Zachaiiie Irish, one of the petty canons of II. M. Free Chapel within 
his Castle of Windsor, 7 June 1672, proved 1 July 1G72. To be buried 
in the upper Cloisters of the said Chapel. To Richard Newman, my 
nephew, now living in Dartmouth in Devon one hundred pounds. To his 
son, my godson, twenty pounds,. To his brother Edward Newman, now in 
Virginia, ten pounds if living. To Sabyna Newman, their sister, if living, 
ten pounds. To my brother in law Master Robert Parsons five pounds. 
To his son Simon Parsons twenty pounds. To my nephew Robert Parsons, 
son to Robert, ten pounds. To his brother and my nephew Thomas Par- 
sons ten pounds. To my cousin William Ilopwood five pounds. To my 
brother in law John Weekes three score pounds. To his two daughters 
Johanna and Elizabeth ten pounds apiece. To my brother in law Master 
Anthony Weekes ten pounds. To his daughter Ureth Weekes ten pounds. 
To my sister in law Joane Foxwell ten pounds. To her son Zacharie Fox-- 
well, and my grandson, twenty pounds. To my sister in law Elizabeth 
Perrye's daughter Ureth five pounds. To my sister in law Margery 
Micheli's daughters Susan and Marge} five pounds apiece. Other friends 
and servants. 1 do nominate and appoint Richard Newman, my nephew, 
of Dartmouth, Devon, merchant, and John Weekes, my brother in law, of 
Petworth, Sussex, gentleman, my sole executors. Eure, 89.. 

Willtam Golde of Bovington in the Co. of Hertford, 2G June 15G8,. 
proved 9 December 15G8. I give to my son John forty shillings (and other 
legacies). To John my son twenty shillings, to be paid at the age of 
twenty seven years by William Gold my sou. To Josapth my son twenty 
shillings and one lamb and one platter and one sheet. To Jhosaffe my son 
twenty shillings, to be paid at the age of twenty one by William Gold my 
son. Similar bequests to son Thomas and to daughters Elnere, Elizabeth, 
Jane and Jone. To Alice Golde my cousin one sheet with a black seam 
and one platter. To Robert Golde one platter. I will that Alice my wife 
shall dwell and occupy the one half of my house and land for the term of 
ten years if she keep herself sole and unmarried. I will Alice my wife 
shall take half the children with her. The residue to wife Alice and son 
William, whom I make full executors &c, and desire William Shakemaple 
to be overseer. 

Wit: T. Gold, Rob 10 Puddyfut, John Gold, Edmdo Grove, with others. 

Ilitchin Registry, Hunts and Herts Wills. 
Archdeaconry of Huntington Vol. 1, fol. 12G. 

Joan Wells of Rovingdon, Herts, widow, 4 December 1583, proved 
21 May 1581. To be buried in the churchyard of Rovingdon. Joane 
Axtell my daughter unmarried. Alice Axtell my daughter. Agnes Ax- 
tell my (laughter. Tymothie Axtell the son of Henry Axtell, my son. 
Jeames Heart the son of Thomas Harte, my son in law. Alice Hart 
the daughter of the said Thomas. A<jnis Goold the daughter of Hughe 
Goold, my son in law. John Goold the son of the said Hugh. Susanne 
Goold the daughter of the said Hugh. Anno Goolde the wife of the said! 
vol. xlix. 23* 



2GG Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

Hugh Goold. Joane Hart my daughter. I make my son Henry Axtell 
sole executor. 1 constitute and make my beloved in Christ Thomas Axtell 
and Thomas Hart my son in law, of Bovingdon, the overseers. All the 
residue to be divided equally between Henry Axtell my son and Joane Hart 
my daughter. 

Wit: Thomas Wilcockes, Richard Axtell, Thomas Hay. 

Hitch in Registry, Hunts and Herts Wills, 
(prob. Vol. 3) — 1579-1G14— fol. 54. 

Thomas Priest of Bovingdon, Herts, yeoman, 24 April 1598, proved 
17 June 1598. Wife Ellyh. Son Thomas. Son Abraham. Daughter 
Alese. Daughter Sara. Daughter Anne and her children. Son John's 
children. Son William's children. William Goulde's son of the half acre, 
my godson. Wife Elline to be sole executrix, and I appoint to be over- 
seers William Goulde of the half acre and John Goulde of the lane and 
John Priest my eldest son. 

Wit: Jjohn Guide & John Goulde 

of merchantes X marke 

Hitchin Reg. &c. Vol. 4* (1593-1606) fol. 8. 

The name of Rychard Goulde appears as a witness to will of William 
Edmand of Bovingdon 7 August 1598. (Same Vol.) fol. 23. 

John Gould of Merchants in Bovingdon, 2 November 1602, proved 
20 November 1G02. To my daughter Rebecka my house &c. in Hempsted 
for the term of six years from the Feast of St. Michael last past, keeping 
same in good reparations from time .to time. And after the expiration of 
the said six years the said house at Hempsted shall remain and be unto 
Nathan, my son, and his heirs forever. To Nathan certain furniture &c. To 
my son Jeremy my close called Cockarames, lying in Bovingdon, containing 
by estimation three acres, more or less, butting upon the hay lane. I give 
also unto Jeremy my son a great chest of oak standing in the chamber over 
the hall. I give my close called Shanckes, lying at sand pitts, containing 
by estimation three acres, to Thomas my son &c, and I give unto him the 
great white chest. To Symon my son (certain furniture) in that my house 
called Boyears, and he shall suffer it to remain for the use of Presilla my 
daughter for the term of six years. To son Steven the great chest of oak 
that 1 myself do use. To Elizabeth my wife my house that I do dwell in, 
called Merchants, and ten acres of land thereunto belonging, more or less, 
for the term of fifteen years &c., with sufficient firewood &c., and the use of 
the table and form in the hall for the term of fifteen years, and after that 
to John my son and his heirs forever. To James my son twenty pounds 
when he shall accomplish the age of eighteen years. Wife Elizabeth to be 
executrix and John Hall, John Gould and William Cocke overseers. 

X 

Wit: John Hall, Jjohn Gvlde, Will" 1 Cocke 

Hitchin Re". &c. Vol. 4, fol. 260. 



'b' 



Ellyn Axtell of Bovington 15 March 1602, proved 1 October 1603. 
To be buried near late husband Thomas Saunders. To my son Matthew 
Eaton. Thomas Hayes the son of Thomas Hayes. Nathaniel Hayes, 
another son of Thomas, and Abiezer Hayes, another. Thomas Goulde the 

* This volume contains original wills and other probate papers bound together in a book. 

H. F. WATBH8. 






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1895.] 



Genealogical Gleanings in England. 



267 



son of Thomas Goulde. My daughter Isabel Hayes, wife of Thomas 
Hayes, to bo solo executor and Mr. John Hall and Thomas Goulde to be 
overseers. Hitcliin Keg. &c. Vol. I, fol. 208. 

Thomas Gould of Bovington, Herts, yeoman, his deed of gift to his 
son John Gould of all his goods &c, dated 2G February ol Elizabeth. 
Among the witnesses were John Goold the elder and William Gould. 

Hitcliin Keg. &c. Vol. 4, fol. 423. 

John Gould of tho land in Bovingdon, 21 January 1G10, proved (month 
and day not given) 1610. My daughter Mary and her sons Frances and 
John Lovatt. To William Hatch, son of William Hatch. My daughter 
Priscilla. My son Thomas to be executor and my sons in law Francis 
Lovatt and William Hatch overseers. John Gould one of the witnesses. 
Hitehin Keg. &c. Vol. 5 (1609-1623) fol. 12. 

Nathan Gould of Tring, Herts, chandler, 18 February 1611, proved 
7 March 1611. To my mother and my brother Jeremie the rent of my 
house, being four pounds a year, or thereabouts, to be equally divided be- 
tween " they " two, this house being within the manor of Hempsted, for the 
term of eight years &c., and after that to Jeremie and his heirs forever. 
My brother Jeremie shall pay unto my sister Rebecca Ware forty shillings 
at the Michaelmas after my decease. Her two daughters, Sara Ware and 
Priscilla Ware, at eighteen. My sisier Priscilla and her two children, 
John Grover and Priscilla Grover, at eighteen. I give unto my brother 
Symon Gould six pounds, to be paid him two years next after my decease. 
To my brother Stephen Gould six pounds in four years. To my brother 
Thomas Gould six pounds in five years. To my brother James Gould six 
pounds in seven years. To the poor of Tring ten shillings and the poor of 
Bovingdon ten shillings. To Francis Clarke of Willstorne five shillings. 
The residue to my brother Jerymie Gculd whom I appoint executor; and 
I do appoint overseers Thomas Gould of " Nuhall " and my cousin Jeremie 
Gould; and for their kindness I give them two shillings. 

Elizabeth Gould (by mark) one of the witnesses. 



Hitcliin Kejj. &c. Vol. 



5, fol. 55. 



Licentia Matr. 
Vicesimo septimo die mensls Jalij Anno diii 1639° apad Whethampsted p 
magrm Jacobu Barker Cllcu surrogate etc., jfnte me Gail: Rolfe no no 
pub 00 ., Concessa fait licentia p celebracone mronil in ecciia \)oll dc Langley 
Regis sen capa de fflaunden inter Symone Goald de Ihvingdon viduu et 
Judllhd Goald de Langley Regis vidua. 

Archd. of Huntingdon, Acta 1638, 1639. 



Judith Gould of Watford, widow, 6 May 1650, proved 3 September 
1050. To my son Abel four hundred pounds and a little box at my cousin 
Gase her house in Hemsteed and all that is in it. To my daughter Lydia 
three hundred pounds. To daughter Elizabeth three hundred pounds. To 
my daughter Hannah, to her two daughters, Hannah and Elizabeth by 
name, I give them forty pounds betwixt them. My son in law George 
Younge by bond owcth mo one hundred pounds. Out of this I will to my 
son Nathan in New England, to his own children, forty pounds and to my 
daughter Sarah her children threescore pounds, if so bo my son Nathan 



2C8 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

hath not divided the goods that my son Zacheus left him when lie died 
equally betwixt them, him and his Sister Sarah: but if they are equally 
divided then this hundred pounds to be equally divided betwixt them both 
for the use of their children. This to be given them a year after my de- 
cease. And if my son Abell he dieth before he cometh of age it is my will 
that three hundred pounds be equally divided betwixt my two daughters 
Lydia and Elizabeth. And of the other hundred pounds I will fifty pounds 
to my daughter Hannah, twenty pounds to daughter Mary and the other 
thirty pounds to be sent to New England for my son Nathan and my daugh- 
ter Sarah their own children, to be equally divided betwixt them both. 
And if the money that I have lent to Parliament should be paid in then 
I will one hundred pounds to my son Abel and forty pounds to my daugh- 
ter Mary, and what other money ariseth from the Parliament I will it 
should be equally divided betwixt my three daughters Hannah, Lydia and 
Elizabeth. For the Minister of Watford, by name Master Goodwinge, I 
will five pounds and to the poor of Watford rive pounds. The residue to 
son Abel and daughters Lydia and Elizabeth and I make them executor 
and executrixes. 

Ralph Kinge one of the witnesses. 

Abel Gould united with his two sisters in taking the oath of probate. 

Pembroke, 145. 

[In addition to the foregoing, I have note of a grant of probate of the will 
of Thomas Gould, Seur. of Bovingdon, made 27 January 1637; but the will 
itself I have not seen. The grant is entered in Act Book No. 5, fol. 27, of 
Archd, of Huntingdon (Hunts and Herts Wills &c.) Hitchin Registry. In 
these Act Books I have found many scattered entries of Marriage Licenses 
in wliicli I saw a number of names that would appear familiar to New England 
genealogists. One of them, relating to this Gould family, I have extracted. 

II. E. YYatkus. 

The following Gould items may be of interest : 

From Parish Registers, Aston Abbotts, Bucks. : " 12 July, 1031, Henry, son of 
Jeremy and Prisollia Gould, bapt." The only Gould entry from 1578-1000. 

From Parish Register, Tring, Herts. : " Buried, 22 May, 1000, Anne Goold." 

Bovingdon is about 10 miles south-east of Tring, and six miles east of Cues- 
ham. 

Lay subsidy 4 Chas. I. (1028) for Bucks. Under Great Missendeu; Zacheus 
Gould, John Putnam (not the ancestor of the Danvers family). 

1 do not now remember if I looked especially for Gould while searching 
Tring registers. I was somewhat hurried. I found the burial of one Annis 
Home there, 7 June, 1598, and such names as Putnam, Weston, Hitchcock, Gates, 
Edmonds, Emerton, Trott, lTummer, Haddock, were common. 

Eben Putnam, of Salem. 

Benjamin Apthorp Gould, LL.D., of Cambridge, who for many years has been 
collecting information about the Gould family, and has just issued a book 
entitled " The Family of Zaecheus Gould of Topslleld," furnishes us with the 
following notes on these Gould wills : 

"William Golde of Bovingdon, the testator of the first Gould will in this 
group, is the one on page 10 of my book (there numbered 12), and Mr. Waters's 
record gives him two (laughters, 'Elnere' and Joan, whom I did not iind in 
the will. Perhaps they were daughters-in-law. 

" Widow Joan Wells, once Ax tell, whose will follows, I conjecture to be my 
No. l;i, sister of the William above mentioned. 

\\ 'John Gould of Merchants' was my No. II, executor of estate of his father 
Thomas. His lirst wife was named Alice. 

"John Gould of the Lane has given me much bother for many years in the 
attempt to identify him with certainty. A personal visit to Bovingdon did no 
good. 






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1805.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 269 

"Nathan Gould of Tring was 'the eldest son of John of Merchants,' and 
died s.jo. 

" Judith of Watford (to which town she removed after the deatli of her hus- 
band) was widow of John of King's Lauglcy, who was a brother of my ancestor 
Zaccheus, and of Jeremy of Rhode Island. Her son Nathan was he who settled 
in Amesbury [Salisbury] in 1G52, and was a citizen of A. in 1G57. His descend- 
ants arc scattered all over New Hampshire and Vermont. Administration on 
the estate of her son Zaccheus, resident in New England, was granted to his 
sister Elizabeth, 1G50, Sept. 12, after the death of their mother Judith; but, as 
the mother knew of his death when making her will May G, 1G50, lie had probably 
been then dead for some time. 

" Internal evidence in Judith Gould's will has long led me to suppose that 
George Young was the husband of Sarah, who was in New England with her 
children; but I have not ventured to assume it with any certainty. The only 
George Young mentioned by Savage was of Scituate, 1GG0, and docs not appear 
to have been the man. 

" If any one has any knowledge of Sarah's husband, I should be grateful to 
receive it. 

" Of the Thomas Gould, senior, of Bovingdon, mentioned in Mr. AVaters's 
note, I have no knowledge." 

Maiigauet Gooding of Okely magna in the Co. of Essex, widow, 23 
Sept. 1G23, proved at Colchester 22 October 1G23. My body I will to be 
buried in decent manner in the churchyard of Okely magna. I give to the 
poor of Okely of mine own gift ten shillings, and whereas there remains due 
to them forty shillings of that legacy which my late loving husband Daniel 
Gooding deceased gave them I will the same forty shillings and ten shillings 
to be paid to them within six months after my decease by mine executor. I 
give my tenement lying in the market of Okely aforesaid and now in the tenure 
or occupation of the widow Bets & Richard Sadler the elder, so much of it 
as they or their assigns have in their occupation, to my daughter Mary 
Stevens and to her heirs forever. I give all and singular my other lands and 
tenements with the appurtenauces thereto belonging, set, lying and being in 
the market of Okely magna, and now in the occupation of Christopher Wilson 
or his assigns, to my grandchild Edward Stone and to his heirs forever, upon 
condition that he the said Edward, or his guardian, shall yearly and every 
year after the nine and twentieth day of September which shall be in 
the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and four and twentieth 
pay or cause to be paid unto my well beloved in Christ, Michaiah Wood, 
parson of Okely aforesaid &c. at or in f .he parsonage house of Okely the 
full sum of six pounds of lawful English money in or upon the two usual 
feasts of the year, i. e. of the annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary and 
of St. Michael the Archangel, by even and equal portions, which yearly pay- 
ment shall continue until the money so paid amount unto the sum of three 
score and nine pounds. And all the said sum or sums of money to be and re- 
main in the custody and imployment of the said Michaiah Wood until the 
three children of my daughter Jone Stone, Richard and Mary Stone and that 
child which my said daughter Jone now beareth in her wombe shall accom- 
plish their several ages of one and twenty years, and that he shall then pay 
unto the said children one and twenty pounds thirteen shillings four pence 
apiece; and the residue of the said sum, that is to say the sum of four 
pounds, I give to Michaiah Wood aforesaid desiring him to accept of it as 
a testimony of my good will towards him. 

I give to the said Edward Stone my best cupboard, my best bed and bed- 
stead, a pair of new blankets, one pair of Holland sheets, one pair of coarse 
sheets, three diaper napkins, one coarse table cloth, threo pewter platters, 
my best brass pot, one tipped jug. I give to my daughter Jone Stone two 



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270 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April, 

pair of fino holland sheets, two pair of new coarse sheets, six diaper nap- 
kins, two pair fine pillowbeeres, one diaper table cloth, one coarse table 
cloth, two coarse towels, six pewter platters, three of them being of the 
bigger sort and three of the lesser. I give to my daughter Mary Stevens one 
pair of Holland sheets, two pairs of coarse sheets, two pairs of Holland 
pillowbeeres, a diaper table cloth, six diaper table napkins, one coarse table 
cloth, two coarse towels, six pewter platters, three of them being of the 
bigger sort and three of the lesser. I give to my grandchild Mary Stone 
one pair of coarse sheets, one pair of fine sheets, three diaper napkins, 
one coarse tablecloth, three pewter platters, one brass pot, one tipped jug. 
I give to Ellen Gooding wife to my son Daniel Gooding my best gown, my 
best cloak, my least apron, a pair of pillowbeeres, a pair of sheets, two 
table cloths, three table napkins, four pewter platters. I give to my grand- 
child Richard Gooding that bed which I now lie on, furnished every way 
saving with pillows. I give to my grandchild Daniel Gooding ten shillings. 
I give to my grandchild John Gooding ten shillings, both which sums of ten 
shillings I will to be paid to the guardian or guardians of the said Daniel 
and John within one year after my decease. I give to my grandchild Mar- 
garet Bridge two old hutches, two pairs of coarse sheets, my middle brass 
pot, four pewter platters of the smaller sort. I give to my son Daniel 
Gooding a winding sheet of (; Lockenun." J give to my son William 
Gooding one pair of sheets and one pillowbeere. I give to Elizabeth Lin my 
servant two pairs of sheets, my blue petticoat, my red waistcoat, my green 
apron, one white apron, two pewter platters of the smaller sort; and my 
executor shall pay to the said Elizabeth Lin the five pounds given her by 
the last will of my husband Daniel Gooding. I give to Margaret Freeman, 
widow, one pair of sheets, two pewter platters of the smaller sort, one pewter 
salt-cellar. All my goods unbequeathed, my debts being paid, my legacies 
and funerals performed, I give to mine executor. I make, appoint and 
ordain my son in law Richard Stone of Weeks executor. 

Wit: William Linn, William Rolff, John Knighte & Robert Cole. 

Robert Middleton 3 April 1627. To my loving brother William 
Middlton of Hamton in Yorkshire all goods, moveables and chattells which 
are or shall be due to me, to say, one trunk wherein is certain goods and 
money, one suit of apparel, a cloak, a girdle, a pair of gloves, with a Pettras 
rug and a Venis looking glass of ebony, likewise live pounds of lawful 
money the which is in the hands of Edward Lane, pulley maker dwelling 
in Shadwell, with all such things as are formerly mentioned, also a debt of 
seven pounds due from Alexander Normans of St. Katherine's, cooper. 
Likewise I give my brother all such goods or apparel and debts as are 
or shall be due to me in the plantation whereof is master Peter Andrews. 
I appoint my loving friends Thomas Babb and Richard Lowther my true 
and lawful overseers to the use of the said William Middelton. 

Commission issued 18 July 1(527 to Thomas Babb one of the supervisors 
named in the will of the said Robert Middlton lately within the kingdom 
of Virginia, bachelor, deceased, during the absence of William Middelton the 
brother, for the reason that he had named no executor in the said will. 

Skynner, 78. 

HoNKit Rockwell of Dorchester, Dorset, widow, 10 July 1G37, proved 
20 January 1()«'J7. To six of my grandchildren, the sons ami daughters of 
my son Richard Rockwell deceased, Thomas, Joseph, Nathaniel, Samuel, 



r 



**'' 1805.] Genealogical Gleanings in England. 271 

Doborath and Mary, twenty sliilling- apiece, to bo paid unto them and either 
of them when they glial] come to the age of one and twenty years &c. To 
my son Roger Rockwell's children ten shillings apiece when they shall come 
to the age of one and twenty years. I give to all my grandchildren in New 
England, both sons and daughters, Richard, Rockwell, William Rockwell 

| and John Rockwell, twelve pence apiece, to be paid at the age of one and 

twenty years. 1 give unto my daughter Jane Farthinge all my wearing 
apparell, except my best whittle which I give to Abigail Rockwell daughter 

* of my son Roger Rockwell. The resf to my son Roger whom I make sole 

executor. 

AY it: Henry Bridges and Thomas Poole. Lee, 7. 

Mauruk Thomson of Havcrsham Bucks Esq. 23 March 1074, proved 
9 May 1670. To be buried in llaversham chancel, by my dear wife. To 
one hundred poor silenced ministers twenty shillings apiece. To Arthur, 
Helena and Elizabeth Thomson, the three children of my dear son Sir 
John Thomson Baronet, one hundred pounds apiece, at one and twenty. 
Bequests to children of eldest daughter the Lady lvatherine Witwrong, late 
wife of Sir John Witwrong, Knight and Baronet, viz'. Katherine, Anno 
and Helena Witwrong. My two hopeful grandchildren William and Sam- 
uel Oldlield at one and twenty. My dear brothers George, Sir William and 
Robert Thomson, trustees for my daughter Martha Corsellis. Nicholas 
Corsellis, her son, at six and twenty. My fourth daughter Elizabetb Alston 
wife of Joseph Alston Esq., and her three hopeful sons, Joseph, Edward 
and Maurice Alston. To my said dearly beloved son Sir John Thomson, 
Baronet, all my freehold manors, lands, tenements and hereditaments in 
England, Treland, Barbados, Antego, St. Christophers, Virginia, the Carebee 
Islands and elsewhere (with provisions per entail). Certain estates in 
London excepted. A jointure for the Lady Frances, wife of Sir John 
Thomson. Bence, 57. 

George Thomson of St. James, Clerkenwell, Middlesex, Esq., 15 
December 1 690, proved 17 January 1690. To wife Abigail one hundred 
pounds a year clear. My manor and parsonage of Bricklinsey Essex. My 
grandson John South. My grandson George South. My niece Mrs. Mary 
Owen. My grandson Richard South. My cousin George Thomson, son of 
my nephew Sir John Thomson, Baronet. George Thomson, son of my 
nephew Sir Samuel Thomson, knight. My nephew Joseph Thomson, son 
of my dear brother Robert Thomson Esq. To my wife my Japan chest 
a Japan cabinet and an Indian cabinet armed with silver. My grand 
daughter Elizabeth South. My cousin Ambler, daughter of my cousin 
Brookhaven. My daughter in law Hannah Cooper. My son in law Mr. 
John Tuifnell. My brother in law M r . Edward Keightley. My son in 
law M r . John Lockey. The poor of Wormeley Herts and of Whatton 
Herts. My body to be buried in Olave's church Southwark, near my late 
wife. Vere, 15. 

[For notes on this family of Thomson see First Fart of Gleanings, pp. G5-67 
and 715-75. Let me take this opportunity to correct two printer's errors on p. G7 
of that Part. In the small pedigree, given there, for " Stokes " read Stakes. And 
in foot-note, for "Fades " read Eedes. II. F. W.] 

Tiiomas Middleton of London Esq. 5 December, 1672, proved 16 
December 1672. I charge all my lands and estates in England with the 



272 Genealogical Gleanings in England. [April. 

payment of my just debts and legacies, and if they fall short my lands &c. 
in Barbados, New England and " Antego," or elsewhere in parts beyond 
the seas. To my wife Elizabeth one hundred and fifty pounds per annum, 
chargeable on my plantations &c. and payable at the now dwelling house 
of John West, scrivener in Walbrooke, Loudon, half yearly &c. Provision 
in case wife be with child. To my dear sister Rebecca Wilkins twelve 
pounds per annum during the term of her natural life (chargeable and pay- 
able as before). To my son Benjamin Middleton all my plantations called 
Mount Plantation and Valley Plantation in Barbados and all other my lands 
and plantations in New.England, Antego and elsewhere, with houses, sugar 
works, mills, servants, negroes &c. &c, chargeable with said annuities &c. 
To wife my coach and horses &c. Reference to accounts with Capt. Henry 
Colleton deceased. To Ursula, one of the daughters of the said Henry 
Colleton, now intermarried with William Gold, linen draper, five hundred 
pounds. To her sister Arrabella, now wife of Samuel Pett, the like sum. 
To my niece Elizabeth Wilkins ten pounds. To Mrs Cordell ten pounds. 
To the poor of Trinity House fifty pounds. My lands &c. in Kent to son 
Benjamin. The children of my daughter Elizabeth Freere wife of Toby 
Freere. My friends M r . John Duckworth, Major Nehemiah Bourne and 
Mr. Nicholas Dawes. Eure, 152. 

Philip Middleton of St. Olave, Southwark, Surrey, waterman, 11 
December 1650, proved 23 December 1650. To my daughter Ilellen 
Harris, wife of Richard Harris dwelling in Barbados, three pounds, to be 
laid out in apparell and sent to her. To my daughter Hannah Pomfast, 
wife to Edward Pomfast dwelling in New England, five pounds and to 
her children three pounds, to bo laid out in clothes and sent to the said 
Hannah and her children. To my daughter Elizabeth Strowd dwelling 
in the Summer Islands three pounds and to her children ten shillings 
apiece, to be laid out in clothes ecc. To my grandson Joseph Kettle four 
pounds and to his children ten shillings apiece. To my grand daughter 
Hannah Kettle forty shillings. To my grandson George Kettle the 
younger five pounds, to be paid for his use to his father George Kettle. 
To my grandchild Philip Seale ten pounds. To my grandchild Mary Scale 
five pounds (and other things). To my grandchild Richard Seale five 
pounds. To my grandchild Margaret Seale three pounds. To my grand- 
child John Seale three pounds. (Philip, Richard and John at one and 
twenty and Margaret at like age or day of marriage.) The residue to my 
daughter Mary Seale, wife of George Seale, waterman, whom I make sole 
executrix. Pembroke, 204. 

William Tyce, 15 July 1649, proved 24 August 1640. To my eldest 
sister Mary Tice one hundred pounds. To my sister Anne Tice living in 
New England or elsewhere, or to her posterity fifty pounds. To the children 
of Thomas King, being in number eight, forty shillings. Unto a girl born 
since named Susan Holder twenty shillings. To the poor of the parish of 
Motcum (Motcombe, Dorset) iive pounds. To Mr. Drant, minister thereof, 
fifty shillings, if dead to his successor. My mother's kindred, if any living. 
My cousin William Mojar. My brother in law's two sons, Walter Tice the 
eldest, Peter Tice the youngest. My friends at Umbra. My cousin John 
Crouch. Others (some residing in India). I the said William Tice was 
born at Motcome in Dorset. Fairfax, 127. 




































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